Fine Art Auctions – Bing Gallery http://binggallery.com/ Fri, 22 Oct 2021 03:55:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://binggallery.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/default-150x150.png Fine Art Auctions – Bing Gallery http://binggallery.com/ 32 32 To sell Picassos, Las Vegas turns to Sotheby’s, Jay Leno and a DJ https://binggallery.com/to-sell-picassos-las-vegas-turns-to-sothebys-jay-leno-and-a-dj/ Fri, 22 Oct 2021 03:55:00 +0000 https://binggallery.com/to-sell-picassos-las-vegas-turns-to-sothebys-jay-leno-and-a-dj/ On Saturday, in a ballroom at the Bellagio Hotel & Casino, Sotheby’s plans to auction 11 works by the Spanish master belonging to gaming giant MGM Resorts International. Sotheby’s estimates their combined value at around $ 70 million. That being Vegas, the auction house plans to inject a lot more pizazz than bidders expect from […]]]>

On Saturday, in a ballroom at the Bellagio Hotel & Casino, Sotheby’s plans to auction 11 works by the Spanish master belonging to gaming giant MGM Resorts International.

Sotheby’s estimates their combined value at around $ 70 million.

That being Vegas, the auction house plans to inject a lot more pizazz than bidders expect from a hushed deal in New York. Sotheby’s transforms a ballroom, a few steps from a sea of ​​slot machines, into an auction room. Yet before anyone picks up a hammer, former talk show host Jay Leno will be giving a talk about his massive collection of cars. After the sale, Pablo Picasso’s great-grandson, DJ Florian Picasso, will spin tunes at an evening featuring cabaret dancers.

“We learned last year that people adapt, but they love surprises,” said Brooke Lampley, president of Sotheby’s and head of global sales for global fine arts.

To pique the interest of big bettors who might not attend the art auctions, Sotheby’s and MGM added a second sale on Sunday at the nearby ARIA Resort & Casino. Items include a pair of Nike worn by great basketball player Michael Jordan during his rookie year in 1984, with an estimated presale value of at least $ 1 million) and a manuscript containing Bruce Springsteen’s handwritten lyrics to “Born to Run “(estimated value of $ 200,000 or more).

The Las Vegas Strip has had a troubled relationship with the fine art. When the Bellagio opened in 1998, its eponymous art gallery featured masters like Jasper Johns and Robert Rauschenberg, and played a role in the hit remake of “Ocean’s Eleven,” which revolved around thieves pulling a heist on an art-loving casino mogul.

The Venetian Resort has opened its own museum featuring works from the collections of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York and the Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg. It closed in 2008.

Most recently, Station Casinos’ brothers Frank and Lorenzo Fertitta planned to exhibit a Damien Hirst aquarium-style tank with a shark dissected in their plans to renovate the Palms Casino Resort before the casino closes. The casino was sold this spring to the Indian Band of the San Manuel Mission.

MGM says it wants to use the proceeds from the sale of Sotheby’s to commission installations like this mural by contemporary artist Okuda San Miguel.


Photo:

Joe Buglewicz for the Wall Street Journal

The Bellagio, owned by MGM Resorts International, still has its fine art gallery, which will continue to hold exhibitions, said Demecina Beehn, curator of special projects at MGM. The typical daily attendance at the gallery hovers around 150 people, she says. The Picasso auction will take place in the Monet ballroom of the casino.

Picasso’s works for sale this weekend have long adorned the Picasso-themed restaurant at the Bellagio, which describes itself as offering “fine dining, authentic Picasso masterpieces, and views of the Bellagio fountains. “. The restaurant replaced the works on sale with other lesser-known Picassos from its collection, Ms. Beehn said.

The works up for auction include a 1938 portrait of the artist’s mistress, Marie-Thérèse Walter, titled “Woman with a Red-Orange Beret,” which is expected to sell for at least $ 20 million, according to Sotheby’s.

There is also a 6-foot portrait from 1969 titled “Man and Child” which is expected to fetch at least $ 20 million, as well as a jewel-toned “Bust of a Man” from the same year which is estimated to be worth. at least $ 10 million. Other smaller pieces in the set include an estimated $ 60,000 ceramic vase incised with the artist’s cheerful marks and a 1917 design, “Pierrot,” which Sotheby’s expects to sell for at least $ 2. , $ 5 million.

The 6-foot Pablo Picasso Man and Child from 1969 is part of the MGM collection which will be auctioned this weekend in Las Vegas.


Photo:

Sotheby’s

MGM officials say the sale of the Picassos in Las Vegas will help the casino operator strengthen its position in contemporary art. MGM says it can save space and money to expand its contemporary art collection, which currently comprises around 900 pieces, many of which are on display at the casino operator’s global properties.

To create a “seamless and cohesive experience,” Sotheby’s Ms. Lampley said the house was building a Sotheby’s ensemble inside the ballroom with teal walls, phone banks and a white gallery. The auction house takes off with its star London auctioneer, Oliver Barker, to lead the sale into the Monet Ballroom at the Bellagio. It is also the hiring of a cellist to perform on the neighboring terrace.

The sale will be broadcast live and will begin at 6 p.m. local time to coincide with 9 a.m. in Asia, Ms. Lampley said. Collectors in California and Texas seem more willing to come to the auction, she said, and the 80 ballroom seats have already been announced. Picasso’s great merchant David Nahmad said he was sending his sons Joe and Helly Nahmad for sale.

The 11 Picassos in the running were originally chosen by Bellagio founder Steve Wynn, the casino mogul and art collector sidelined by the industry after allegations of sexual misconduct were brought against him three years ago, which he denied. Mr Wynn, 79, resigned as director of Wynn Resorts in 2018. Mr Wynn, contacted through his gallery, Wynn Fine Art, declined to comment on the upcoming sale.

Picasso’s 1969 “Bust of a Man” will be auctioned this weekend in Las Vegas.


Photo:

Sotheby’s

Ari Kastrati, director of hospitality for MGM, said MGM had “moved on” and intended to use an undisclosed portion of the proceeds from the sale to purchase more works by women and artists of color emerging.

Mr Kastrati said he also hopes the sale can give a boost to Sin City’s aspirations to become a fine arts destination. Plans were scrapped amid the pandemic to build a $ 200 million art museum that could serve as a branch of the Nevada Museum of Art in Reno, museum director David Walker said.

Locals were also initially slow to embrace Swiss artist Ugo Rondinone’s installation “Seven Magic Mountains” south of Las Vegas in 2016, with its colorfully painted rock totem towers, though it now attracts hundreds of visitors every day.

For Michele Quinn, longtime Las Vegas resident and former MGM curator who went on to advise collectors like Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen, the next auction is “bittersweet” because the Picassos at the Bellagio were among the few major masterpieces that locals could see near home. Selling them, she said, is like “a liquidation or the end of an era.”

Ugo Rondinone’s “Seven Magic Mountains”, located a few miles south of the Las Vegas Strip, attract several hundred visitors a day.


Photo:

Gianfranco Gorgoni / Artistic Production Fund / Nevada Museum of Art

Write to Kelly Crow at kelly.crow@wsj.com

Copyright © 2021 Dow Jones & Company, Inc. All rights reserved. 87990cbe856818d5eddac44c7b1cdeb8


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INAUGURAL WOMEN IN ELDRED’S ARTS AUCTION SCHEDULE 28 OCTOBER https://binggallery.com/inaugural-women-in-eldreds-arts-auction-schedule-28-october/ Mon, 18 Oct 2021 03:40:56 +0000 https://binggallery.com/inaugural-women-in-eldreds-arts-auction-schedule-28-october/ The most anticipated lot at the auction, with an estimate of $ 20,000 / 30,000, is a 14 “x 11” oil on canvas by Fidelia Bridges (American, 1834-1923). She studied under William Trost Richards, who became a friend and promoted her work to his patrons. www.eldreds.com East Dennis, Mass. – Eldred’s will hold its first […]]]>

The most anticipated lot at the auction, with an estimate of $ 20,000 / 30,000, is a 14 “x 11” oil on canvas by Fidelia Bridges (American, 1834-1923). She studied under William Trost Richards, who became a friend and promoted her work to his patrons.
www.eldreds.com

East Dennis, Mass. – Eldred’s will hold its first annual Women in the Arts auction, featuring listed American women artists, from 19th century examples to important contemporary works, on Thursday, October 28. The auction will take place at 4 p.m. at the company’s headquarters in East Dennis, Mass., Cape Cod, and a portion of the proceeds will go to WE CAN, a Cape-based women empowerment organization.

“The goal of the auction is to rediscover female artists of the 19th and early 20th centuries that the market may ignore, and to provide a new sales channel for established contemporary female artists looking to expand their reach.” said Joshua Eldred, president of Solidify.

The planned upper lot, estimated at $ 20,000 / $ 30,000, is a serene view of birds in a marshland landscape by Fidelia Bridges (American, 1834-1923). It is a characteristic work of the artist, with special attention and realistic details. Other examples from the 19th and early 20th centuries include an interior scene with two women by Eda Elisabeth Sterchi (American, 1885-1969), estimated at $ 7,000 / 10,000, “The Mountain, Bearsville, New York, 1947 ”by Georgina Klitgaard (American, 1893 -1976), estimated at $ 6,000 / 8,000, pencil drawing“ Louise, in a fluffy beanie and coat, kept by Queen ”by Mary Cassatt (American / French, 1844–1926), estimated at $ 4,000 / 6,000, and a Landscape with Swans by Olive Parker Black (American, 1868–1948), estimated at $ 4,000 / 6,000.

The sale includes just over 260 lots, featuring works by contemporary artists Molly Dee, Elaine Coffee, Pamela Pindell and Katherine Ann Hartley, as well as several lots of artists from Provincetown and Cape Cod including Anne Packard, Elizabeth Mumford and Martha Cahoon. In addition to the paintings, the auction also includes jewelry and handicrafts made by women artisans.

“When I was a young boy, every artist I knew was a woman – from my mother who drew for me, to my art teachers in elementary school, to the neighbor who sold her paintings at local exhibitions.” , Eldred said. “When I imagined an ‘artist’, I imagined a woman. The sad reality, however, is that women are extremely under-represented in the art world. Tellingly, Eldred said it was harder than expected for his assessment team to find paintings by female artists, especially examples from the 19th century, although he is proud of what the company has. discovered.

Portrait of a Mother and Child by Pauline Palmer, a staple of the Chicago art scene in the early 20th century, is estimated at $ 3,000 / 5,000 before the sale. Palmer began spending the summer on Cape Cod around 1915 and studied with Charles Webster Hawthorne in Provincetown.
www.eldreds.com

Eldred’s charitable partner for the auction is WE CAN, a 20-year-old organization based in Harwich, Mass., Which annually serves more than 2,500 local women with free and confidential legal services, support for the employment and business, as well as financial empowerment and personal development. programs.

“There has been great enthusiasm for the sale from the time we announced it, within our community and clientele to the larger art market,” said Eldred. “We think this is just the start of what will become an annual auction for us.”

The Women in the Arts Auction is a live auction with in-person, online and telephone auctions. A preview of the sale will take place on Wednesday October 27, the day of the sale, and by appointment. Interested bidders are asked to visit www.eldreds.com or call 508-385-3116 to confirm the exhibition schedule and submission options. A complete catalog is available online or by mail.

About Eldred
The Robert C. Eldred Co. is New England’s oldest antique and fine art auction house, now in its third generation of owners within the Eldred family. In addition to its corporate headquarters on Cape Cod’s historic Old King’s Highway in East Dennis, Mass., The company also has an office at 5 Roosevelt Avenue in Mystic, CT. Eldred’s, the country’s leading marine art auction house, holds approximately 25 auctions per year encompassing Americana, paintings, Asian art, European decorative art, sports art, and collectibles in addition to marine art. It was recently named one of the world’s best auction houses by Art + Auction and holds auction records in a wide range of collecting areas.


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Heritage Auctions organizes the sole proprietorship sale of nearly 100 works by African-American artists, including Sargent Johnson, James Lesesne Wells and Elizabeth Catlett https://binggallery.com/heritage-auctions-organizes-the-sole-proprietorship-sale-of-nearly-100-works-by-african-american-artists-including-sargent-johnson-james-lesesne-wells-and-elizabeth-catlett/ Fri, 15 Oct 2021 18:00:35 +0000 https://binggallery.com/heritage-auctions-organizes-the-sole-proprietorship-sale-of-nearly-100-works-by-african-american-artists-including-sargent-johnson-james-lesesne-wells-and-elizabeth-catlett/ HERITAGE AUCTIONS in Dallas, Texas will sell a treasure trove of African-American art from a private collection next month. The selections include works by Elizabeth Catlett, Charles White, Charles Alston, Romare Bearden, Jacob Lawrence, Mavis Pusey, Emma Amos, and Sam Gilliam. The best lots are “Tête de jeune” (circa 1930), a terracotta sculpture by Sergeant […]]]>

HERITAGE AUCTIONS in Dallas, Texas will sell a treasure trove of African-American art from a private collection next month. The selections include works by Elizabeth Catlett, Charles White, Charles Alston, Romare Bearden, Jacob Lawrence, Mavis Pusey, Emma Amos, and Sam Gilliam.

The best lots are “Tête de jeune” (circa 1930), a terracotta sculpture by Sergeant Claude Johnson and “Wanderers” (circa 1930), a figurative painting by James Lesesne Wells. The two works are estimated between $ 30,000 and $ 50,000. The auction takes place on November 5 and takes place during the second session of the American Art Signature Auction.


Lot 67214: SARGENT CLAUDE JOHNSON (American, 1888-1967), “Head of a Youth”, circa 1930s (terracotta, 7 inches / 17.8 cm) high by 3 1/2 inches / 8.9 cm high wooden base). | Estimate $ 30,000 to $ 50,000

Recorded by a collector based in Canada who prefers to remain anonymous, 95 lots of more than 60 modern and contemporary African-American artists are on offer. A range of mediums is represented, from painting to sculpture, including mixed media and works on paper. The majority of the works are limited edition prints. The material spans nearly a century, dating from the late Harlem Renaissance in the 1930s to the present day with “Racquel Come to Me Two”, a digital pigment print produced by Mickalene thomas in 2018.

Other auction highlights include “Head of a Woman” (circa 1938), a second sculpture by Johnson; “Surrealist figures with tribal mask”, an undated painting Charles Alston; watercolors Bob Thompson, Norman Lewis, and Eldzier Cortor; and an abstract steel sculpture by Harold Cousins.

Three ink, wash and collage portraits of historical women were made in 1942 by Lois Mailou Jones for an illustrated calendar of 12 American women. Prints of historical figures such as Benny Andrews, Vivian E. Browne, Margaret Burroughs, Hughie-Lee Smith, and John Wilson, are offered. A number of artists active today are also featured including Thomas, Gilliam, McArthur Binion, Rashid Johnson, Richard Mayhew, Martin Puryear, Faith Ringgold, Betye Saar, Jamel Shabazz, Lorna Simpson, and Anne Tanksley.

HERITAGE CALLS THE EVENT “Soul of a Nation: Black Art From a Distinguished Collector”, boldly borrowing the name of the flagship exhibition organized by Tate Modern in London. Showcasing award-winning original works produced by some 60 iconic African-American artists between 1963 and 1983, “Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power” (2017-20) has traveled around the world to museums in Arkansas, New York, Texas and California. .

Aviva Lehmann, vice president and director of American art at Heritage Auctions, told Culture Type that the shipper has spent his career in the entertainment industry. He “originally collected historical documents and manuscripts relating to black history and from there over the past 15 years he has become very interested in fine art, mainly from the Renaissance to Harlem and even today, ”she said. “At Heritage, we looked after its collection of historical documents. It worked very well (as of January 2019). We had a relationship with him and I was able to convince him to let us sell his collection of works of art.

Lehmann added: “It’s just exciting for me. We are an American auction house. We do very well with American art and I just thought it was time, as an American auction house, to focus heavily on black art because it is such an integral part of our history. . I am happy to handle it.

“We are an American auction house. We do very well with American art and I just thought it was time, as an American auction house, to focus heavily on black art because it is such an integral part of our history. . I am happy to handle it. – Aviva Lehmann, Heritage auctions


Lot: 67222: JAMES LESESNE WELLS, (American, 1902-1993), “Wanderers”, circa 1930 (oil on canvas, 18-1 / 4 x 24-1 / 2 inches / 46.4 x 62.2 cm). | Estimate $ 30,000 to $ 50,000

A catalog accompanies the sole proprietorship with Johnson’s “Head of a Youth” adorning the cover. The catalog features an essay by Halima Taha, artistic and cultural strategist and author of the book “Collecting African American Art: Works on Paper and Canvas”. She writes about the collection of black visual culture and chronicles the growing interest in African American art in the aftermarket. The catalog also includes an introduction by the collector, who signs his contribution with the initials: “JS”

About ten years ago, after observing the African American art auction market for a few years, “it became clear to me that this was an area of ​​collecting that I could participate in. And most importantly, it was still affordable, which it is. more and more difficult to say. The work was visually exciting, varied, powerful and even revealing, ”he wrote.

According to him, passion and love are the key motivations that drive collectors. “Each addition to a collection, acquired with diligence and method, is like fitting a piece to a puzzle that will never be completely finished. As the puzzle grows, new perspectives open up, knowledge expands, appreciation of objects, their makers, the social context in which they were made, deepens, ”wrote the collector.

“This has certainly been the case with my collection of noir art which is being auctioned here today. If the world of Black Art had not been opened to me, I would never have had the privilege or the pleasure to meet such wonderful and accomplished artists as Romare Bearden, Elizabeth Catlett, Jacob Lawrence, Emma Amos, Sargent Johnson, Mickalene Thomas, and it isn’t even starting to scratch the surface. CT

* Condition reports included with each lot disclose issues of aging, wear and damage

LEARN MORE The first session of the American art auction on November 5 at Heritage Auctions features three works by African-American artists: “Head of a Boy” (nd) by Richmond Barthé; an undated billiard room painting by Ernie Barnes from the Steve Lawrence and Eydie Gorme collection; and “Harlequin” (circa 1956), a collage by Romare Bearden on various papers with paint, ink and pencil on paper estimated at $ 250,000-350,000. The Bearden Collage has labels on the back of the ACA Galleries, Jerald Melberg Gallery, Whitney Museum of American Art, and National Gallery of Art. The museum’s labels cite photographer Frank Stewart as the lender of the traveling exhibition “The Art of Romare Bearden”. The provenance of the lot lists Stewart and artistic and cultural strategist Halima Taha, who decades ago co-owned the Onyx Gallery in New York City.


Lot 67217: LOIS MAILOU JONES (American, 1905-1998), “Village Street”, circa 1950 (watercolor on paper, 11 1/2 x 8 1/2 inches / 29.2 x 21.6 cm). | Estimate of $ 3,000 to $ 5,000


Lot 67231: ELIZABETH CATLETT (American, 1915-2012), “Survivor”, 1983 (linocut on paper, 9 3/8 x 7 1/2 inches / 23.8 x 19.1 cm), Ed. 142/1000. | Estimate of $ 3,000 to $ 5,000


Lot 67236: CHARLES WILBERT WHITE (American, 1918-1979), “Head of a man in profile”, posthumous print, circa 1984 (engraving on wove paper, 8 7/8 x 12 inches / 22.5 x 30.5 cm ), annotated in pencil lower left; artist’s estate stamp lower right, printed and published posthumously by Hand Graphics, Ltd., Santa Fe, New Mexico with ink stamp on reverse. | Estimate of $ 2,000 to $ 3,000


Lot 67286: RALPH ARNOLD (American, born 1924), “Cascade”, 1986-88 (pencil, acrylic and pencil on paper, 22 5/8 x 22 1/4 inches / 57.5 x 56.5 cm , sheet). | Estimate of $ 1,000 to $ 1,500


Lot 67291: EMMA AMOS (American, born in 1938), “At the top of the world”, 1996 (color engraving with collage of fabric on paper, 75.9 x 56.2 cm, sheet), ed. 16/60. | Estimate of $ 2,000 to $ 3,000


Lot 67298: BETYE SAAR (American, born 1926), “Keep for Old Memories, 1976 (offset lithograph on paper, 13 3/4 x 18 1/8 inches / 34.9 x 46.0 cm, sheet), ed . 57/250. Printed by Cirrus Editions, Ltd., Los Angeles. | Estimate of $ 1,200 to $ 1,800


Lot 67242: JACOB LAWRENCE (American, 1917-2000), “Revolt on the Amistad”, 1989 (color silkscreen on wove paper, 35 x 25 3/4 inches / 88.9 x 65.4 cm, image), ed. . 88/120. Posted by Spradling-Ames, Key West Printed by Lou Stovall. | Estimate of $ 6,000 to $ 8,000


Lot 67296: MICKALENE THOMAS (American, born 1971), “Racquel Come to Me Two”, 2018 (digital pigment print, 15 1/8 x 11 5/8 inches / 38.4 x 29.5 cm, image; 16 1/2 x 13 inches, sheet), signed, dated and edited 9/50 in pencil. | Estimate of $ 4,000 to $ 6,000


Lot 67219: SARGENT CLAUDE JOHNSON (1888-1967), “Head of a Woman”, circa 1938 (glazed terracotta, 5 1/2 inches / 14 cm high by 3/4 inch / 1.9 cm painted wood base ). | Estimate $ 15,000 to $ 25,000

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Watch the game unfold with an expert at the Hong Kong Olympics Watch https://binggallery.com/watch-the-game-unfold-with-an-expert-at-the-hong-kong-olympics-watch/ Thu, 14 Oct 2021 10:02:07 +0000 https://binggallery.com/watch-the-game-unfold-with-an-expert-at-the-hong-kong-olympics-watch/ It was the day before the auction of important Sotheby’s watches in Hong Kong, all shiny and hopeful. I sat down with Rich Lopez, Senior Watch Specialist at Sotheby’s, to review some of the most impressive pieces on the sale. I wanted to deepen the psyche of the legendary watch collector. I wanted to understand […]]]>

It was the day before the auction of important Sotheby’s watches in Hong Kong, all shiny and hopeful. I sat down with Rich Lopez, Senior Watch Specialist at Sotheby’s, to review some of the most impressive pieces on the sale.

I wanted to deepen the psyche of the legendary watch collector. I wanted to understand the emotional satisfaction that comes with winning an offer. I wanted to know how these timepieces could offer a single human so much weight and prestige among other watch geeks.

Rich assured me that the auction model wasn’t just for the watch scholar, nor for the one percent. “With online sales this means that there are now prices for everyone, you can start bidding on watches without reservation and set your price between one thousand and five thousand,” he explained.

So watches are for (almost) everyone, but why is the used watch market exploding so quickly? Why, for example, is the market value of a Royal Oak Audemars Piguet at an all time high? Why do people give firstborns for a Patek Nautilus? Why can’t anyone get their hands on a new Rolex?

I wanted to learn more about the inner workings of today’s pre-owned watch market right from the source. As appealing as the second-hand market may seem, I felt the need to clear up some basic facts before sending other readers on a daring foray into the auction world.

Rich told me about his top picks at the next auction.

Lot 2208, Patek Phillipe 5004 Platinum (sold for [US] $ 986,570)

We’re starting big with the Patek Phillipe 5004 Platinum. Before I even spoke to Rich, I was intrigued by this rare premium bundle. My incessant research into the dark depths of the horological space had previously led me to speculate on a return to the perpetual calendar.

Please, no more AP Royal Oaks or Patek Aquanauts! Show me something complex. Something on a leather strap. Something a savvy collector would see of value. “Everything happens in cycles,” Rich said. “Years ago you couldn’t give away a steel Nautilus, but I think the perpetual calendar will come back to the fore.”

Rich argued, quite frankly, that this was due to supply and demand. There aren’t enough Nautilus in the world to meet everyone’s needs and wants, so if a customer has $ 100,000 to spend, they may shift their focus elsewhere and seek out the best quality perpetual calendar. that he can buy. And so the cycle continues!

Formerly owned by Eric Clapton, this Patek 5004 comes with a personalized blue dial, perhaps the only one of its kind. Anything Patek makes with a blue dial in this current market is known to double or triple its price.

This year has also seen the rise of the green dial, with Cartier, Hublot, Omega and virtually every watch brand all offering their vision of the green mania. I predict the boom in the mass market of the salmon-colored dial. I will also add that the Royal Oak Salmon could potentially bring me back to the monopoly of steel watches.

Lot 2095, FP Journe Tourbillon Souverain “Subscription” (sold for [US] $ 2,043,950)

Next in Rich’s picks, and his best-selling favorite, was the FP Journe Tourbillon Souverain “Subscription”. FP Journe is the new kid on the block in the auction world. The brand has exploded over the past year, adding to the intrigue surrounding lesser-known independent watchmakers.

Journe’s subscription model was really unique: if you bought a watch and he made another in the same series with the same number, he would later give it to you for free. It was an unusual commercial gimmick that paid off right across the board. The number one series of this watch is auctioned off with a competitor and is estimated to be at least $ 4 million. The moral of the tale? Read on and keep an eye out for little marks, kids!

Lot 2255, Rolex Day-Date, Reference 1803 (sold for [US] $ 501,960)

“It’s time to get Rolex into the conversation,” said Rich. This 1803 day-date reference is what connoisseurs would call a unique piece. It is the only Day-Date with a special order black dial that typically belongs to a sports model (like the Rolex Submariner). People wanted to hate this watch. “No one wanted to believe it was real, people were destroying it until we produced the papers indicating that Rolex had repaired the watch,” Rich explained. He continued that the way the market is changing, it really is the time to sell unique pieces and special editions.

Rolex still reigns supreme in the world of watchmaking – it is the most recognizable of all brands and controls 25% of the global luxury watch market. But even if you have the money, you’d be hard pressed to get your hands on a brand new model right now. There is a Rolex drought! The scarcity of these retail watches boils down to the uneventful issue of supply and demand, so let’s go for the second-hand market.

Lot 2242, Patek Philippe Reference 5307 (sold for [US] $ 1,655,209)

I was not ready for the 5307, a perpetual calendar tourbillon in platinum and diamonds. I even gave Rich an audible gasp over the phone. “IS THIS FACTORY SET?” ” I screamed. I’ve seen Nautilus bezels set with diamonds and sapphires, but a “Grande Complication” baguette diamond set looks like a cut above the rest. I thought the Patek diamond setting was a job just for the guys from the 47th Street aftermarket. Fine jewelry watches are my favorite type of watch, reserved for the super rich and famous. They are a perfect hybrid of mechanical intelligence and stupidly expensive rare gems. These are royal levels of Tutankhamun.

The main takeaways

The more I got into things with Rich, the more it started to sound like the equivalent of the Olympics to watch fans. The auction begins at 2 p.m. HKT (2 a.m. EST), which means people have to stay up late for the results. I’m not sure I have the same level of commitment to the cause, but it’s a global market and the competition is fierce, so serious bidders have no choice but to stay awake no matter what. the time zone.

Does all this hysteria indicate that we are living [another] rebirth of the mechanical watch? The frenzy around the second-hand market and the surge in the value of many iconic timepieces indicates a cultural wave of watchmaking fandom. But for many people who buy a high-priced watch, functionality comes after aesthetics. From a sociological point of view, watches are the postmodern signifier of wealth. In the same way that jewelry has served as a status symbol for monarchs and clergy, a Rolex President distinguishes your high-income “craftsman of taste” from your everyday millennial.

Rich and I ended our conversation on the topic of auction accessibility. “You don’t have to feel intimidated by the retailer anymore, you don’t have to worry about the seller judging whether or not you are actually going to buy,” he told me. “You can log in and see the collection of watches we have at all prices.”

You don’t have to enter this store either: you can usually preview the pieces in the months leading up to an auction, and if you can’t make it to a physical visit, specialists are available for questions. online or by phone. .

Sotheby’s offers two components to its watch sales. The first part is for large watches (live auctions with prices ranging from 20,000 to sky-high), and the second part is for fine watches (online auctions with watches without reserve and usually capped at around $ 100,000. ). Part 2 sales last for two weeks so customers have enough time to do their due diligence; they can search for articles and contact specialists on time.

While we can all marvel at the spectacle of a diamond encrusted Nautilus under the hammer for millions of dollars, it’s not just a one percent game anymore. Go ahead, I say, and start your journey cheaply. Great deals !


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Surrealist Gertrude Abercrombie’s Star Continues to Rise with Over $ 180,000 Sale of “Pyramid and Moon” https://binggallery.com/surrealist-gertrude-abercrombies-star-continues-to-rise-with-over-180000-sale-of-pyramid-and-moon/ Tue, 12 Oct 2021 21:36:08 +0000 https://binggallery.com/surrealist-gertrude-abercrombies-star-continues-to-rise-with-over-180000-sale-of-pyramid-and-moon/ Gertrude Abercrombie, “Pyramid and Moon”, oil on canvas, signed L / L and dated 1946, 10 1/4 “x 12 1/2”.Kaminski auction Kaminski Auctions’ special fall art auction on September 19 at the North Shore Art Association in Massachusetts featured a small oil painting by Gertrude Abercrombie (American, 1909–1977) that climbed to $ 181,250 (with fees) […]]]>

Gertrude Abercrombie, “Pyramid and Moon”, oil on canvas, signed L / L and dated 1946, 10 1/4 “x 12 1/2”.
Kaminski auction

Kaminski Auctions’ special fall art auction on September 19 at the North Shore Art Association in Massachusetts featured a small oil painting by Gertrude Abercrombie (American, 1909–1977) that climbed to $ 181,250 (with fees) against an estimate of $ 10/15,000.

Dated 1946, the work measuring 10¼ by 12½ inches, titled “Pyramid and Moon”, was from an estate in Danville, California.

At Sotheby’s in May 2021, the little Abercrombie’s Giraffe painting (4 3/4 by 6 1/2 inches), eestimated at $ 10,000 to $ 15,000, hit an artist auction record of $ 365,400.

Self-taught, Abercrombie has developed his own style incorporating two-way symbols in mysterious settings.

Known as “the queen of bohemian artists”, Abercrombie was a friend of Chicago jazz musicians such as Dizzy Gillespie, Charlie Parker and Sarah Vaughan, from whom she was inspired. She has also hosted trade fairs with artists, dancers, musicians and writers at home, with her role in the mid-20th century art scene currently explored in the exhibition Chicago Avant-Garde: five women ahead of their time, now through December 30, at the Newberry Library in Chicago.

His work is also now featured in Supernatural America: The Paranormal in American Art, a traveling exhibition that debuted at the Toledo Art Museum in June and is currently at the Speed ​​Art Museum in Louisville, Ky. (October 7, 2021 – January 2, 2022), before traveling to the Minneapolis Institute of Art, where it will be from February 19 to May 15, 2022.


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Focus on e-commerce: why high-end luxury goods are adopting NFTs https://binggallery.com/focus-on-e-commerce-why-high-end-luxury-goods-are-adopting-nfts/ Mon, 11 Oct 2021 19:15:32 +0000 https://binggallery.com/focus-on-e-commerce-why-high-end-luxury-goods-are-adopting-nfts/ Banksy got engaged to the NFTs with a work called “Morons”. – Copyright AFP Argent SHARMA Non-fungible tokens (NFTs) are becoming increasingly popular as an e-commerce product. An NFT is a single, non-interchangeable unit of data stored on a digital ledger (blockchain). The growth of DTVs is now reflected in high-end consumer goods. So why […]]]>

Banksy got engaged to the NFTs with a work called “Morons”. – Copyright AFP Argent SHARMA

Non-fungible tokens (NFTs) are becoming increasingly popular as an e-commerce product. An NFT is a single, non-interchangeable unit of data stored on a digital ledger (blockchain). The growth of DTVs is now reflected in high-end consumer goods. So why would a well-established luxury goods retailer turn to these intangible assets?

To learn more, Digital journal met Joe Ladin, CEO of SFLMaven

Digital Journal: Can you provide a brief overview of SFLMaven Corporations?

Ladin: We are an online real estate jewelry store that has a weekly Thursday night auction on eBay with over 200 unique pieces. What’s really special about our auctions is that they’re not all unqualified. This means that the bidders decide the value of the coins and that goes for everything, engagement rings, diamond studs, designer pieces signed like Tiffany & Co., Rolex, etc. We also have a wonderful selection for those who prefer to “Buy It Now.” At the heart of my business model is always to be sure to provide our customers with quality and beautiful pieces that can be truly valuable. Over the past 18 years we have been based on eBay, but recently our business model has evolved and we are now also present on 1stdDibs.com.

DJ: You started your business with an e-commerce model over 18 years. Why then did you decide to sell only your luxury products online?

Ladin: Back then, my main reason I focused on shopping online was because it was the only way to reach a global customer base and it appealed to me. Even though shopping for luxury goods or buying anything in general online didn’t seem natural to most, it still made sense to me. Another reason was that I was able to enter a market where traditionally a business owner had to spend hundreds of thousands of dollars to have a great showroom to woo a potential client. However, with my online store I was able to skip all of this and still have my skin in the game.

DJ: How has the pandemic impacted your business?

Ladin: The pandemic has catapulted online shopping like a rocket. With everyone staying at home, the convenience factor of shopping online has really blossomed. You can see this across the board in many areas of the lifestyle. SFLMaven has been considered one of eBay’s best sellers for 18 years now, which means we have high customer satisfaction and also stand behind the authenticity of our products. This means that people who may not have considered buying jewelry online feel reassured and now shop with us. Nowadays, the technology is so advanced that people buy our parts directly from their phones. It’s truly amazing how far technology and its leadership has come.

DJ: SFLMaven recently announced the launch of a new Collectibles Marketplace strategy, what does that imply?

Ladin: Our collectibles strategy is really exciting and suits us perfectly. Something that we are noticing more and more is how people are diversifying their investment portfolios and collectibles is one of those avenues. We will expand our reach into other areas by acquiring various types of collectibles companies. Using the strength and trust of our brand, we will create synergy on many levels between categories, which will allow us to deliver more value to our customers.

DJ: Why are you focusing on NFTs as part of your collectibles strategy?

Ladin: I am someone who enjoys doing business in the present but anticipates the future and NFTs are the future of art. Having an ecommerce business in 2004 was unheard of, but it felt right and it felt like this was where the future of shopping would evolve. The fine arts world appreciates and values ​​history and pieces that have period significance. With the NFT art market still in its infancy and technology evolving at rapid speeds, I think these pieces could be invaluable in the future. Think about the first editions.

DJ: What kind of trends do you see with NFTs and other collectibles?

Ladin: Qualified collectors understand how valuable it is to invest early in a particular niche. This can make the difference by making a moderate profit to, in other cases, millions. When you are focusing on articles that have early additions, getting there early is crucial. This is exactly what the NTF market is. Over the past 20 years, technology has changed the way society works and looking to the future, it is easy to see that technology will only become more and more integrated into our daily lives.


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Art NFT: what is it and where to buy it https://binggallery.com/art-nft-what-is-it-and-where-to-buy-it/ Fri, 08 Oct 2021 23:16:30 +0000 https://binggallery.com/art-nft-what-is-it-and-where-to-buy-it/ Arkadiusz Warguła / iStock.com Whether or not you know how they work, you must have heard of NFTs. They became extremely possible last year after a digital artist named Beeple sold an NFT for $ 69.3 million online. In this guide, we will explain what crypto art is and where to buy NFTs. What is […]]]>

Arkadiusz Warguła / iStock.com

Whether or not you know how they work, you must have heard of NFTs. They became extremely possible last year after a digital artist named Beeple sold an NFT for $ 69.3 million online.

In this guide, we will explain what crypto art is and where to buy NFTs.

What is a TVN?

A non-fungible or NFT token is a digital asset that you can collect. It holds a value in cryptocurrency and can be bought or sold.

These tokens are considered non-fungible because you cannot exchange one NFT for another. For example, if you have 1 Bitcoin, you can exchange it for another Bitcoin and still have one Bitcoin, functionally the same as the first. Thus, Bitcoin is a fungible token.

On the other hand, an NFT cannot be exchanged since two NFTs do not have the same value, since each NFT has a unique digital signature.

How do NFTs work?

NFTs are present on a blockchain, usually Ethereum, and are “struck” or created from digital objects that may represent intangible or tangible assets, such as:

  • Video highlights
  • Sports highlights
  • GIF
  • Art
  • Collectibles
  • Designer sneakers
  • Music
  • Video game skins or virtual avatars

Even legendary tweets can be sold as NFT art. For example, Jack Dorsey, the founder of Twitter, sold his very first tweet as NFT for $ 2.9 million.

Crypto art as a proof of concept

Before NFTs surfaced, it was difficult to profit from digital art creation. No one believed that digital artists could make millions of dollars for just one piece of art.

However, as NFTs became more mainstream, artists and artists began to see the untapped potential of the digital art market. Sotheby’s, Christie’s and other fine art auction houses have opened their doors to digital art and held NFT exhibitions.

Did you know?

Art lovers can also indulge in a new form of collecting with the rise of NFT art.

For some, it’s quite baffling that a digital artwork can sell for millions.

Mike Winklemann, commonly referred to as Beeple and the historic million dollar NFT salesman mentioned earlier, explained in a School of Motion podcast, “Value is scarcity, and others want it. That’s it. If nobody wanted it, there would be no value.

What do you get when you buy an NFT?

When you buy an NFT, you get a piece digitally signed by the artist. The sale is tracked on the Blockchain so that no one else can claim ownership of the NFT.

The metadata and the unique identifier manage the ownership of an NFT. Each token struck is accompanied by a unique identifier linked to an address hosted on a blockchain, such as Ethereum.

You can either keep the NFT in your wallet forever or sell it later. In some cases, the original creator of the NFT will get royalties on the resale.

What does this mean for artists and collectors?

For artists, this means they can expand their source of income by symbolizing their work, such as digital art, memes, videos, or music.

Artists can take advantage of smart contracts to ensure consistent income. A smart contract refers to a digital contract defined in code, which can be scheduled to run if certain predefined conditions are met.

How crypto art is struck

Crypto art is created through smart contracts which then assign ownership to the creator and manage portability. When you create an NFT, you run the code in a smart contract. Smart contracts must meet specific standards, such as ERC-721.

As a result, the information is added to the blockchain managing the NFT. The creator’s public key becomes a permanent part of this token’s history. Therefore, the original artists can receive royalties whenever the NFT is sold.

For example, platforms such as Zora and Foundation pay royalties to artists. Likewise, owners of Euler Beats Originals receive an 8% royalty each time the royalty is subsequently sold.

Offer artists a different place to exhibit their work

Traditionally, artists have had to rely on an intermediary to make their work accessible to the public: galleries, record companies, publishers and others.

To sell NFTs, artists can use different NFT marketplaces and platforms, such as SuperRare, Foundation VIV3, OpenSea, NFT ShowRoom, and Axie Marketplace.

For art collectors, NFTs are a way to make a profit. You can buy a crypto work of art with the hope that its value will increase in a few years. Then you can resell it at a profit.

Cryptographic art scene

The first experiment in crypto art was carried out by Anil Dash and Kevin McCoy, who wanted to create “monetized charts”. The idea arose when people shared media on Tumblr without any compensation or attribution, leaving artists dry when it came to capitalizing on their work, even though the work was very successful.

McCoy and Dash were successful in creating the first blockchain-based method of claiming ownership of a digital artwork, and they did not patent this idea. They believe that technology should allow artists to control their work so that others cannot make it their own without their permission.

Empower artists

By creating monetized graphics, the duo wanted to prevent technology from becoming another method of exploiting artists. Dash believes their vision of empowering artists has not come true, although it has created a lot of “commercially exploitable hype.”

After them, John Watkinson and Matt Hall created a collection of pixelated-headed collectible characters. They made 10,000 of these CryptoPunks and sold 9,000, keeping the rest to themselves and hoping they would increase in value over time.

Initially, this project didn’t get a lot of hype. But when Mashable wrote an article about CryptoPunks’ influence on digital art, the Punks sold out in a single day. A recent sale of a Punk, CryptoPunk 7253, also known as Covid Alien, grossed $ 11.75 million at Sotheby’s.

NFT and sports

The NFTs have also caused a sensation in the world of sport. Many people around the world watch sports, and many of them are die-hard fans who would pay thousands of dollars for their favorite player’s autographs or a signed item.

NBA Top Shot pioneered sports NFTs by allowing fans to bid on digital trailers. Highlights were called “moments” and buyers could keep them in their online portfolios.

With over a million users, NBA Top Shot is among the most successful NFT projects. As of February 2021, $ 230 million had been spent on the platform for trading and purchasing digital collectibles.

The crypto market overheated in 2019 and the following year prices for crypto artwork exploded. While cryptocurrencies like Ethereum and Bitcoin have seen their price increase, the value of NFTs has also increased.

What future for NFTs?

As for the future, NFTs appear to be doing well, despite the pandemic and changes in the crypto market. Mintable, an NFT marketplace backed by billionaire Mark Cuban, raised $ 13 million in its Series A round. Cuban was not the only high-profile investor involved in the project. Other investors, such as Expedia Group, 640 Oxford Ventures, Spark Digital Capital and Digital Finance Group, also attended the event.

Where to buy NFT art?

You can buy NFT art in several markets, including:

  • Clever gateway
  • Super rare
  • Asynchronous art
  • MakersPlace
  • Known Origin
  • Foundation
  • Zora
  • OpenSea

All of these platforms contain different types of artwork, such as music, digital paintings, images, PDFs, etc.

Alternatively, you can buy NFT artwork at art-house auctions, such as those at Sotheby’s or Christie’s. Sotheby’s sold its first NFT at an online auction in June this year.

Meanwhile, Beeple’s $ 69.3 million work was sold at Christie’s.

Where to sell NFT art?

If you are an artist and want to know where to sell NFT art, you can check out the following platforms:

  • Super rare
  • Foundation
  • BakerySwap
  • OpenSea
  • Scarcity
  • Known Origin
  • Atomic market
  • Myth Market
  • Enjin Market
  • Portion

Another way to sell your NFT art would be to auction it off at an art house. Even the youngest artists are getting into the action at the big auction houses. Eighteen-year-old FEWOCiOUS is the youngest artist featured at Christie’s, his digital art having sold for an impressive $ 2.1 million.

Final take

NFTs are extremely popular and make millions for artists. While not everyone who makes an NFT will become crypto art millionaires, NFTs have debunked the myth that digital art isn’t profitable.

About the Author

Scott Jeffries is a seasoned Florida-based technology professional. He writes on the topics of business, technology, digital marketing and personal finance.
After earning his bachelor’s degree in management information systems with a minor in business, Scott worked for 15 years in the technology field. He has helped Fortune 100 company startups bring software products to life. When not writing or creating software, he can be found reading or spending time outdoors with his children.


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True Colors: MoMA PS1 Grand New York, New Museum Triennial and Present Moment Prize! https://binggallery.com/true-colors-moma-ps1-grand-new-york-new-museum-triennial-and-present-moment-prize/ Fri, 08 Oct 2021 21:30:42 +0000 https://binggallery.com/true-colors-moma-ps1-grand-new-york-new-museum-triennial-and-present-moment-prize/ Last week I was talking to Alain Servais, a jet set collector who, in the days of the globe-trotting madness of the Before Times era, attended about 30 fairs a year, when he revealed something of an open secret among merchants of art and their clients. In art nouveau surveys such as Greater New York […]]]>

Last week I was talking to Alain Servais, a jet set collector who, in the days of the globe-trotting madness of the Before Times era, attended about 30 fairs a year, when he revealed something of an open secret among merchants of art and their clients. In art nouveau surveys such as Greater New York and the New Museum Triennial, if the text on the wall says that the work is courtesy of the artist and his shopping gallery, it more often than not means that the work is for sale.

“My favorite place to see art and even buy art is in museums and biennials,” Servais said on air as I interviewed him for a podcast. “People are sometimes shocked when I say that … Rather than going to art fairs and getting second or third grade works – because normally artists will keep the best for museums – you go to MoMA PS1 or go to the New Museum and the works are sometimes available, although some know this trick. It is the best place to buy.

Until recently, this was considered a fairly specialized approach – Greater New York City could never be mistaken for an art fair. Hosted at the former MoMA PS1 school in Long Island City and held once every five years, the show is a scaled-down, New York-focused version, for example, Documenta, the five-year survey of contemporary art that takes place will take place next year in the sleepy town of Kassel, Germany. It’s a methodical exhibition where artists are selected after years of studio visits, and the market buzz takes a back seat to criticism from curators.

But such is the thirst for fresh material among world-class collectors that any high-profile exhibition of new works by institution-nominated artists is greeted with a binge eating. Greater New York City – and, later this month, the New Museum Triennial, another survey conducted several times a decade that attempts to take the cultural temperature – comes at a time when demand for work out of the studio is peaking. . Mega-galleries such as Hauser & Wirth have priced the works of their art stars at unprecedented prices, turning off collectors with mid-size portfolios. Last month, that same gallery sold an exhibition of new work by Singer Avery up to $ 1.2 million per painting. As of February 2020, works of similar size cost just under $ 500,000. It’s not just the singer. Hauser & Wirth also sold a new painting of Rachid johnson for $ 975,000 in September. In the months leading up to the foreclosure, a larger work by Johnson sold at the gallery for $ 595,000.

And the gold rush spurred real-time change. Hiring the art fair guru Noah Horowitz at Sotheby’s (reported by True Colors in August) was apparently spurred in part by the hope that he could convince the galleries he worked with at Art Basel to entrust the auction house with new works instead. . The online effort platform is essentially an eternal digital art fair supported by David Zwirner where small galleries can offer works by their lesser-known artists to the ever-hungry clientele.

And this week, Sotheby’s announced that it will be launching from scratch a brand new evening sale called The Now, dedicated to the work of emerging artists, who were previously relegated to minor league auctions that take place during the day. the new job, the house suggested, was just too hard to ignore.

“We are seeing the rapid emergence of a new generation of collectors who feel a real connection to the art of their time,” said Brooke Lampley, Sotheby’s responsible for global sales for global fine arts, in a press release, explaining the creation of a whole new category of art, more contemporary than contemporary.

Which brings us to Greater New York, which opened to the public Thursday after a few days of premieres for press and customers. I visited Tuesday morning, arriving at the still dilapidated art space to find an in-depth and awe-inspiring investigation of 47 artists and collectives, from millennial discoveries to older artists with work placed in a new context – an exhibition that, in curator-ese, “offers new perspectives and opens up geographic and historical boundaries by identifying both specific and expanded local narratives in a city that elicits a multitude of perspectives. Um sure!

But the keen observer has been able to read between the lines when it comes to how these works will eventually pass from institution to collection. (Note that the MoMA PS1, unlike its big sister in Manhattan, is not a collector’s institution, and therefore does not acquire any works itself.) On the second floor, an installation by Steffani Jemison consisted of a series of polished stones on a platform, and next to the platform three rocky tumblers rumbled, smoothing out the rough products of geology that would eventually be turned into a work, churning the making of art laid bare in the museum.

The text on the wall was revealing. Jemison had exhibited in the small but influential New York art space run by Kai Matsumiya, but the work was “courtesy of the artist and Greene Naftali”, referring to the Chelsea pillar who represents global artists such as Alex Israel, Haegue Yang, and Cory Archangel. Indeed, the gallery’s website confirms that they had faced off against the rising star, and will be opening an exhibit next month, apparently to take advantage of the propulsion caused by the exhibit in Queens.


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Strauss & Co auction managers on white glove sales and producers of prodigy wines of SA https://binggallery.com/strauss-co-auction-managers-on-white-glove-sales-and-producers-of-prodigy-wines-of-sa/ Thu, 07 Oct 2021 15:01:49 +0000 https://binggallery.com/strauss-co-auction-managers-on-white-glove-sales-and-producers-of-prodigy-wines-of-sa/ This is an exciting time for South African wine as the Strauss & Co Fine Wine Auctions, in partnership with auction partners, fine wine merchants Wine Cellar and Higgo Jacobs, will feature the first rare wines from the most esteemed producers Alheit Vineyards, Sadie Family and Vilafonté. wines. Mainly sourced from the producers’ private cellars, […]]]>

This is an exciting time for South African wine as the Strauss & Co Fine Wine Auctions, in partnership with auction partners, fine wine merchants Wine Cellar and Higgo Jacobs, will feature the first rare wines from the most esteemed producers Alheit Vineyards, Sadie Family and Vilafonté. wines.

Mainly sourced from the producers’ private cellars, this auction offers a rare opportunity to purchase the best ripe South African wines at the October 10 auction. Previous producer-themed auctions in 2020 and 2021 have highlighted companies like Klein Constantia, Meerlust and Kanonkop, offering unreleased vintages and unique lots.

We spoke with Susie Goodman, Executive Director of Strauss & Co Auctions and Roland Peens, Director of Fine Wines, about this meaningful partnership which strives to bring to market large volumes of vintage wines from the SA.

Susie Goodman, Executive Director of Strauss & Co Auctions:

Q: Susie, you are one of SA’s foremost art experts, running the Strauss & Co auctions as an executive director. Tell us about the recent addition of fine wines to the portfolio and how did this integration go?

A: Beyond our expectations to say the least! It was an absolute pleasure and pleasure to observe the development, growth and enthusiasm generated by the wine department. Despite the combination of a few blockages, varying levels of Covid-19 restrictions, and curfew limitation in 2020 and 2021, these challenges have all helped to connect and grow a department virtually, physically, and with a healthy dose of ‘vooma’. “. !

The first inaugural wine auction took place in Johannesburg in June 2019 and eight auctions later we had two incredible “white glove” sales – in May and July 2020 – a fabulous achievement for an old department. a year ! The White Glove is a fabulous auction term that evokes glamor and excitement, but truly means 100% amazing sale… all lots find buyers at an auction! All auctioneers dream of having a white glove sale. Having arrived so early is a testament to the care, professionalism, research, market knowledge and passion that Roland, Higgo and Sarah have put into the development of the wine department. The May 2020 white glove sale was held under Level 5 restrictions, with a small team of five in the auction room, a large number of cables and cameras, and “the world” connected to us via a auction console. Our Covid-19 silver liner was that we took Strauss & Co wine auctions to people’s homes and spaces and connected them in new and surprising ways.

One of our strengths as an auction house is the ability to sell across departments, interests, collectors, geography, and sales clusters. The addition of the wine department has been imperative to provide our clients with access to fine wines, wine collections and an alternative asset class. Wine collectors then look further and buy fabulous art, this is the integration we were also hoping for!

Q: How was the addition of wine received by your existing customers? Did you win new bidders and was there an overlap?

A: Wine auctions have been very well received by our existing customers and the expansion of our auction offering has attracted a wider audience. We are very much in line with the international auction houses that have a long history of offering wine among other important collecting areas. James Christie included the wine in the inaugural auctions at Christies in London in 1766. Strauss & Co offered their inaugural wine in June 2019. We’re certainly the new kids in the neighborhood in comparison 255 years later, but it’s good to follow a proven combination. .

The whole world has had to jump on digital platforms, make new connections, pivot to different markets, offers and types of auctions. At Strauss & Co, we have seized these challenges and opportunities to rethink and reshape our auctions into the “new normal” in which we find ourselves. This has brought a considerable number of new buyers, developed our market and increased the demand for high quality products. lots at auction. Bringing an auctioneer into your house makes the whole process more accessible. We are no longer defined by location or geographic boundaries. With the current exchange rate and the considerably lower commission structure we offer, for an international collector buying at a Strauss & Co auction this is incredible value. Our reach and expansion has created an overlap of collectors and a significant flow of new buyers, and more buyers from all over the world, entering our auctions. It’s so exciting and a privilege to witness this growth and reach. We are truly part of a global auction world.

Q: Wine auctions seem to be reaching new heights in South Africa, tell us about a recent event?

A: What a privilege to answer this question! It brings me a big smile and also highlights the fun, opportunities and ideas that we are involved with in a fast paced and growing auction house. In our Johannesburg office, we had the opportunity to set up an auction of 90 lots around a theme of Impressionist / Expressionist artwork. The selection of works, all by South African artists, fit under these banners and provided us with a context to makeover, discuss and appreciate a number of our important artists. When we presented this brilliant spring-themed auction idea to the wine department, they enthusiastically wondered: what would that mean in the context of South African wine! ?

They came up with “574 years of South African wine icons”. They jumped on the offer of five large lots which, when the ages of the wines added up, produced the grand total of 574! Give the collector access to an incredible history of ownership and context. Leading the pack was the sizable 375ml bottle of Grand Constance 1821. The excitement in the venue, on the phone and with the online bidders was palpable, and the momentum kept mounting! There were fierce auctions on the single bottle from many potential buyers. As the battle intensified, the price kept going up, and the staff all held their breath in anticipation as the bids continued to appear on the internet auction console and came from the telephone bidders. . Where would it end? We have passed R400,000 and records keep dropping! The hammer eventually came down to R967,300 (including Buyers Premium and VAT). Five bottles totaling 574 in years sold for R1 274 560!

An exhilarating moment for novice and seasoned collectors who compete to determine the value of this privileged wine of Napoleon! These are the best times in the auction world, a dream for an auctioneer, for the department and for the seller. I think we can safely say that the Strauss & Co wine department has reached maturity in just over two years and has achieved more than a few of the seals of approval from the auction world!

Roland Peens, director of fine wine auctions Strauss & Co

Q: Roland, in light of this recent sale, how do you think the Strauss & Co wine auctions are helping to build the secondary wine market in South Africa?

A: The partnership between Strauss & Co, fine wine merchants Wine Cellar and Higgo Jacobs brought significant volumes of vintage wines to the market for the first time. Since 2019, we have seen the market increase in volume and price as consumers dictate the price rather than the producer. The increase in trade contributes to the formulation of a market price, which has never been available for South African wines.

Q: And now, on October 10th, another sterling auction features SA’s most sought-after wines by major SA producers. Please tell us more?

A: Our producer-focused auctions spotlight South Africa’s first tier of growers, with Alheit Vineyard, Sadie Family and Vilafonté in the spotlight on October 10. Early vintages from each of these three legendary modern South African producers are now scarce as we carry vintage stocks direct from their cellars.. It is surely the largest offer of the three producers on the secondary market.

Q: Can you give us an industry insight on these producers and how they are shaping South Africa’s wine landscape?

A: Eben Sadie is the South African wine evangelist and the wines of the Sadie family are arguably the most sought after wines in South Africa. Around the same millennial period, Vilafonté started out as an ambitious luxury wine label with partly American ownership. Alheit emerged a decade later but quickly became the master of Chenin Blanc in South Africa. The three producers offer wines that are always brilliant and worthy of aging and have played an important role in the South African fine wine revolution.

Connections

https://www.winecellar.co.za/

https://www.straussart.co.za/auctions/details/10-oct-2021

Online Catalog

Link to the electronic catalog https://www.straussart.co.za/auctions/catalogue/10-oct-2021/1

Videos and podcasts

Can be viewed on the website – and from each individual lot.

These videos are also featured on the Strauss & Co. YouTube channel.

Alheit Vineyards

Podcast https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f3AJ57z1OjI

Wines of the Sadie family Podcast https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OzORFIEtEUw

Vilafonté Podcast https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J9UPgNAhFu4


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Independent agency acquired by larger establishments … https://binggallery.com/independent-agency-acquired-by-larger-establishments/ Wed, 06 Oct 2021 23:01:02 +0000 https://binggallery.com/independent-agency-acquired-by-larger-establishments/ Henry Adams Lettings acquired Country & Coastal Lettings, a small independent in Hampshire. Ian Wiggett, Managing Director of Henry Adams, said: “This is our latest acquisition in recent years as we look to continue growing the business, both organically and through mergers, acquisitions and joint ventures with reputable companies such as Country & Coastal. “We […]]]>

Henry Adams Lettings acquired Country & Coastal Lettings, a small independent in Hampshire.

Ian Wiggett, Managing Director of Henry Adams, said: “This is our latest acquisition in recent years as we look to continue growing the business, both organically and through mergers, acquisitions and joint ventures with reputable companies such as Country & Coastal.

“We look forward to working with our new owner and tenant clients and, along with Samantha Hazle and the Country & Coastal team, we are working hard behind the scenes to make sure the transition is as seamless as possible for our clients. We are also delighted to welcome two new members of the Country & Coastal team.

Hazle, who acquired Country & Coastal Lettings in 2015, adds: “While it was not an easy decision to leave Country and Coastal, it was much easier to know that I would hand it over to Henry Adams who shares the same high standards, which put their customers first and ensure that their landlords and tenants receive the best customer service available.

“It was also very important for me to choose a local independent real estate agent with many years of experience behind them. I have no doubt that our owners and renters will be delighted with Henry Adam’s pursuit of what Country and Coastal have strived to achieve over the years.

In addition to a team of vacation rental and vacation rental specialists, Henry Adams also has in-house property managers and offers advice on planning, land and development, new homes, residential sales, d agricultural, commercial and works of art auctions.



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