Fine Art Auctions – Bing Gallery http://binggallery.com/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 06:00:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://binggallery.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/default-150x150.png Fine Art Auctions – Bing Gallery http://binggallery.com/ 32 32 £20m for a T-Rex? Why dinosaurs are eating up the art market https://binggallery.com/20m-for-a-t-rex-why-dinosaurs-are-eating-up-the-art-market/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 06:00:00 +0000 https://binggallery.com/20m-for-a-t-rex-why-dinosaurs-are-eating-up-the-art-market/ King of the Tyrant Lizards: this is the translation of the Greek and Latin name attributed, in 1905, to a species of dinosaur newly discovered by the president of the American Museum of Natural History, the paleontologist Henry Fairfield Osborn. Its coinage was an inspirational marketing coin: The first thing many think of when they […]]]>

King of the Tyrant Lizards: this is the translation of the Greek and Latin name attributed, in 1905, to a species of dinosaur newly discovered by the president of the American Museum of Natural History, the paleontologist Henry Fairfield Osborn.

Its coinage was an inspirational marketing coin: The first thing many think of when they hear the word “dinosaur” is the creepy figure (flapping tail, powerful hind legs, bone-crunching mandible) of a Tyrannosaurus Rex, which lived in what is now the American West around the end of the Cretaceous period, about 66–68 million years ago. In a new TV documentary, Into Dinosaur Valley, airing tonight, historian Dan Snow tells the story of his discovery, along with that of various other dinosaurs.

Today, in addition to being scary, the remains of a T-Rex can be incredibly expensive: later this month, a 40-foot-long T-Rex skeleton nicknamed Shen (a Chinese word for ” Godlike”) was due to be listed for sale by Christie’s in Hong Kong, with a top estimate of $25m (£21.2m) – until news broke earlier this week that the lot had been took of. Supposedly, the sender, following a change of heart, decided to loan Shen to a museum instead – although according to reports in America there was controversy over how much of the skeleton was fake.

Next month, however, at a single lot sale in New York, Sotheby’s still expects to sell a T-Rex skull (which it calls Maximus) for up to $20 million. It follows another sale held this summer by the auction house, also in New York, of a 22-foot-long Gorgosaurus (a predatory relative of the T-Rex that lived around 80 million years ago). years), which cost $6.1 million.

But perhaps more surprising than these outrageous prices is that in Hong Kong, Shen would have been the star of a 20th and 21st century art auction, rather than a natural history sale. Apparently the latest fad among the super-rich is to display fossilized skeletons alongside paintings and sculptures. The dinosaurs, it seems, now roam in a new environment – the fine art habitat.

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Why John Waters is giving his all to the Baltimore Museum of Art https://binggallery.com/why-john-waters-is-giving-his-all-to-the-baltimore-museum-of-art/ Fri, 18 Nov 2022 20:31:21 +0000 https://binggallery.com/why-john-waters-is-giving-his-all-to-the-baltimore-museum-of-art/ The director John Waters has been collecting contemporary art for decades, and he has built up a hoard full of quite idiosyncratic works. Take, for example, Karine Sanderit is Gebrauchsbild (2010). The artist did nothing to the canvas. She was never on the same continent as the canvas. She just told her dealer, Frederic Petzel, […]]]>

The director John Waters has been collecting contemporary art for decades, and he has built up a hoard full of quite idiosyncratic works. Take, for example, Karine Sanderit is Gebrauchsbild (2010). The artist did nothing to the canvas. She was never on the same continent as the canvas. She just told her dealer, Frederic Petzel, to leave it in the garden of his Hamptons home for a summer. Eventually, the canvas developed a green-black mold, and that’s the job. Petzel feared the mold would poison him, so he refused to bring it home. Waters bought it immediately.

“(A) is beautiful to me. Looks like a Robert Ryman painting. And (b) it can kill you; it can ruin your house. He could disappear. And his Dear,“he said Wednesday, standing at the Baltimore Museum of Art, staring at the rotting fabric he bought from a posh gallery for big bucks.

“There is everything I like in contemporary art. I think art for the people is a terrible idea—I As elitism,” he continued. “It’s a secret language. You have to dress a certain way; you have to learn a language; you have to be able to see. It’s a magic trick. And once you can, every day you come home, nothing is the same.

The work, along with 371 others, was donated to the institution by the legendary 76-year-old filmmaker, author, performer, artist and collector in 2020. It is his hometown museum. Although he has homes in New York and San Francisco and summers in Provincetown, Waters never left Baltimore; if he is, as the nickname says, the pope of the basket, it is his Vatican City. Walking with him on a weekday in the historic port city was surreal. Waters, instantly recognizable to everyone with his pencil-thin mustache and mischievous smile, speaks in a low baritone, with that rare, slightly southern real Maryland accent despite coming from a state in the Union. Waters is probably the most iconic Baltimorean the city has produced since Edgar Allan Poe, and he’s treated like a deity there, even as his films deal in smut and scatalog. The hip new hotel I was staying at, Ulysses, has decor deeply influenced by the John Waters–Charm City aesthetic exhibited in movies like crybaby and Hairspray.

And if it’s his Vatican City, that makes the Baltimore Museum of Art something akin to Waters’ Sistine Chapel. It was there, brought by his parents, that he made his first purchase of art: a poster of a work by Joan Miró. In 2018, the museum gave him a retrospective, and now there’s another one of sorts. On Sunday, a new show, “Coming Attractions: The John Waters Collection,” opens to the public, giving those who have never been invited to his Christmas party a chance to see the horde of unmistakably John Waters treasures. Of the hundreds of works, 90 were selected and curated by the artists Jack Pierson and Catherine Opie at Waters’ request. He had no idea how they would be settled until he walked in on Tuesday.

“I’ve always loved the museum in Baltimore, it’s one of the first places that ever honored me, long before it was sure to love me,” Waters says. “I have always stayed in Baltimore. My career wouldn’t have gone so well if I had left.

I asked how having his private collection in the hands of a public institution had furthered his juice. He said he particularly wanted the difficult works to enrage and torment ordinary Baltimore residents who come to the museum to see the Matisses. He leaned over to show me Mike Kelley’s child substitute (1995), a rough collage of cut-out cats glued to paper.

“He’s my favorite Mike Kelley because he then infuriates people,” Waters said.

“That’s very Mike Kelley,” I said.

“He is. It’s pitiful, and he made up pitiful,” Waters replied. “But pitiful is very important. A lot of this art is pitiful. It’s a movement of pitiful.

We came across a framed piece of lined paper on which Cy Twombly had written her address. When an artist takes a note for logistical purposes, it is usually not a work of art. Then again, some of the late artist’s works are just words he wrote on the canvas, and his improvised business card certainly looked like a Twombly.

“That I to like,says Waters. “And I always said I would never show it because I met him and we were hanging out and I said, ‘Can I…? That’s how he wrote me his address.

To drive the point home, there’s a piece of Twombly around the corner, Five Greek poets and a philosopher, it’s just text, just the names of the poets and the philosopher. John Waters Sr. was so angry that his son spent his hard-earned movie money on the job that he made his own Twombly to show how anyone could do it, scribbling “Crazy” in an eerily similar style to that of the artist, then signing it “Cy W.” It is now part of the BMA’s collection, suspended between works by Opie and Pierson.

Waters entered the art world as a collector, having grown up frequenting galleries at New York University and reading about exhibits at The Voice of the village when he was in Baltimore. He often walked around with Brenda Richardson, the longtime BMA curator, and found it easy to access primo works because dealers loved his films so much. Mary Boone gave him a big discount just because the painting was entering his collection. He befriended the biggest drug dealer in the world, Larry Gagosian, and they stay close – when Gagosian hosted a dinner party for Andreas Gursky in May, he reserved the seat next to him for Waters.

“He hired me to write the script for the Elizabeth Taylor Warhol show, and my business would have driven collectors so crazy,” Waters says. “He printed them on the wall, which I said. He was awesome. He didn’t censor anything. I haven’t bought anything from Larry in a while – by the time they get to his place I can’t afford anything.

It was much harder for galleries to take him seriously as an artist. He didn’t have the bona fides of an art school education and an MFA from Yale, and could be seen as a Tinseltown intruder slumming in SoHo with the art maniacs. That changed after speaking with one of the dealers he bought from, American Fine Arts founder Colin de Land.

“Colin was my first dealer – I would never have made it in the art world without Colin, because there’s nothing people hate more in the art world than someone who comes from the show business,” Waters says. “There is nothing more hated. Colin, he legitimized me. He said to me: ‘Do you ever paint?’ And I said, ‘Well, I have all these little pictures.’ He said, ‘What do you mean by these little pictures?’ Because I had some, but I hadn’t shown them to anyone. So he came down and saw them, and he gave me a show.

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A silent auction to preserve our painted history https://binggallery.com/a-silent-auction-to-preserve-our-painted-history/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 22:28:34 +0000 https://binggallery.com/a-silent-auction-to-preserve-our-painted-history/ Proceeds from a silent auction at the Fine Line Art Gallery on Scott Street will help keep the gallery open and preserve the painted history of a small town for years to come. The Fine Line Art Gallery is currently home to 13 local artists who pay a small monthly fee which allows them to […]]]>

Proceeds from a silent auction at the Fine Line Art Gallery on Scott Street will help keep the gallery open and preserve the painted history of a small town for years to come.

The Fine Line Art Gallery is currently home to 13 local artists who pay a small monthly fee which allows them to exhibit and sell their works in the gallery which attracts both local and foreign interest. All proceeds from art purchases go directly to the artist, an arrangement that ensures artists are rewarded for their work.

For artists who don’t have a monthly subscription, they can pay a small one-time fee and pay a 20% sales commission to exhibit and sell their work. The gallery has been supporting local artists for almost 30 years.

Bright colors and neat strokes of paint portray the interests and livelihoods of a quaint small town in many of the paintings on display at the gallery. Additionally, laser photography, stained glass, sculptures, and many other art forms are featured.

The gallery’s mission is to nurture the visual arts rather than make a lot of profit. But keeping the doors open means keeping the expenses small.

At this year’s silent auction, which only runs until November 18, local artists have donated their artwork and dedicated all of their profits to help keep the gallery open.

“We’re on a bit of a shoestring budget,” said Emily Hyatt, one of 13 gallery members who has been an active volunteer at the auction.

“The funds will help keep the building open. We are a small gallery. We sell [art] there, but we also promote art within the community. That’s what we’re here for, just to have a nice place where people can go and see art and enjoy it.

“And we also get a lot of people from out of town stopping in because a lot of people are traveling, they would like to see a local gallery. It’s a place where they can get to know the area and get to know the people.

Bidders are encouraged to evaluate a variety of art forms and to bid silently in writing. There is no auctioneer present, hence the name “silent auction”.

Interested persons can bid during gallery opening hours from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on weekdays and from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturdays.

Hyatt donated his stained glass windows at the auction, and other local artists who donated their works include Hal Gerson, Jean Richards, Sheila Shaw, Bob McDonald and Ryan Daw, to name a few. -ones.

Hyatt said people donated more than just artwork at the auction. One of the items to be won is a decorated Christmas tree.

“It’s convenient because sometimes people are new to the community, you know, and it’s just an opportunity for them to have a tree totally ready to go,” she said.

Jean Richards, whom Hyatt has described as “our inspiration and our go-getter”, founded Fine Line Art Gallery nearly 30 years ago. She had been a member of a small gallery in Manitoba and wanted to create one for Fort Frances. She recalled a woman in the community who helped pay her monthly rent when she heard about Richards’ financial situation when the gallery opened.

“When I started, we had eight members. And I had a wife that I got to know, she always gave me $50 a month to help pay the rent because she knew there was only eight of us. [members] and we were really pinching pennies to keep it going.

“I was up to 17 members at a time and it was great. But then a couple passed away and four or five of them moved out. And now we have 13. But I think we’ll maybe -may lose one or two, so we need new members.

“There are a lot of artists in town but they don’t feel like joining a gallery is going to benefit them… As soon as they’re told they have to pay monthly, it almost scares them away. You know, I don’t think there’s a single member who doesn’t sell enough to pay a month’s rent. Everyone sells something. You may not be selling $85 a month, but most months you are.

She thought of a woman who visited the gallery and then left because the gallery wasn’t busy like other businesses in town. Richards noted that most galleries were like this, including galleries in big cities, which rarely draw large crowds on regular days.

When it comes to his gallery, Richards views things with optimism. “I’m sure we’ll manage,” she said.

Richards said the popular phrase “the struggling artist” is true because artists create paintings that don’t sell until much later. “And we always laugh when I say, ‘Oh, I guess I’ll be rich after I die.’ It’s a common joke among artists.

“Sometimes I say, ‘Oh, I’m going to paint this,’ and then you paint it and then you think, ‘Who’s going to want this? But you know, most of the time, whatever it is, it ends up selling. It may not sell immediately, but it will. Because everyone has different tastes and different desires. You just have to get the right person to like what you’ve done. Not everyone likes the same thing.”

Two of his paintings are in this year’s auctions – a laundry painting called “Blowing in the Wind” and a box of 20 assorted cards of original and printed paintings.

“Blowing in the Wind” is one of a series designed to show laundry around the world.

“I didn’t do all the trips. I did a few, but then my sister was in Portugal and then she was in Africa. Some of the others I’ve done [travel to] like I’m in St. Kitts and the surrounding area here,” Richards said, noting that the laundry painting from Africa has already sold out but the one from Portugal is still available at this time.

“I’ve had a very interesting artistic life,” Richards said.

Her most memorable moment is the launch of Fine Line Art Gallery, she said.

“I mean, opening the gallery and having it running for that long is wonderful. How many people can hold out as long as me? Because there were times when I was like, ‘Oh, why did I do that? Will it work?’ But then you go through it.

On September 16, a day she will never forget, Richards was hit by a car around the corner from the post office, sustaining multiple injuries and weeks of physical therapy. Although she took time off from the gallery to recuperate, she confidently stated that as long as she was still around, the gallery would remain open.

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Meet the experts bringing your old CRT TVs back to life https://binggallery.com/meet-the-experts-bringing-your-old-crt-tvs-back-to-life/ Sun, 13 Nov 2022 14:00:00 +0000 https://binggallery.com/meet-the-experts-bringing-your-old-crt-tvs-back-to-life/ If you’re a gamer of a certain age, you probably have fond memories of playing your favorite retro console in front of a square TV. However, while many gamers have kept their old consoles — or bought them back at garage sales and eBay auctions — CRT (cathode ray tube) televisions are largely a discarded […]]]>

If you’re a gamer of a certain age, you probably have fond memories of playing your favorite retro console in front of a square TV. However, while many gamers have kept their old consoles — or bought them back at garage sales and eBay auctions — CRT (cathode ray tube) televisions are largely a discarded relic of the past. You can probably find dozens of examples gathering dust at your local thrift store, junkyard, or maybe even your grandma’s house. But are they actually worse than your cheap LED replacement, or do they deserve a second chance at life? According to the enthusiasts who work tirelessly to fix them, they’re more than just a relic, they’re the best way to play decades of classic games.

When CRT enthusiast Steve Nutter plugged in his old consoles to show his young son the games he grew up playing, he was utterly appalled at the results. His beloved N64 games looked horrible on his LCD TV, with washed out colors, flickering picture and huge input lag. He turned to the internet for advice, where he discovered one of retro gaming’s worst-kept secrets – that an old TV is basically necessary for any stock console setup.

Fortunately, Nutter had an old Toshiba lying around, which he was able to resurrect for his nostalgic purposes. As an engineer by training, he found himself constrained by the complex machinery of these screens. He watched YouTube videos made by hackers and phone “phreakers” who liked to play with machines, slowly gathering his knowledge base. Over time, Nutter’s interest in CRTs grew so much that he started scouring Craigslist and bidding on eBay auctions, looking for the really desirable CRTs like Sony’s PVMs and BVMs. And one day his luck changed: a high-end PVM was on sale at a reasonable price just a short drive away. What he found changed his life almost overnight.

“I found a local vendor who was a CRT recycler,” says Nutter. “When I went to pick it up I saw they had 25 PVMs just sitting in a warehouse. That was in 2015 when they were being recycled in hospitals and medical clinics. The owner told me explained that they were struggling to find enough space to put them in. When I told him I wanted to buy them all, as far as he was concerned, I was doing him a big favor.

Sony’s Trinitrons are among the most sought-after consumer CRTs.

When Nutter brought the dozens of boxes back to his garage, he soon realized that most of them had significant issues. Some wouldn’t even turn on. It was then that he decided to learn how to repair them as best he could, if only to recoup some money for his one-time investment.

“When I started, I was sitting in a room surrounded by PVMs, and I was like, ‘Who’s going to want to buy all this?’ I thought I had made a big mistake, but once I started working on them, suddenly everyone wanted them.

What makes a high-end CRT like a PVM or Trinitron better than your childhood Zenith? As Nutter says, it all depends on the use case. PVMs and BVMs are professional-grade monitors intended for broadcast use in a work environment, such as a hospital or TV studio. These boxes are designed to do things that consumer TVs simply can’t, including color adjustment and scanline customization. Over the years, knowledgeable sources like Digital Foundry have shown that high-end CRTs are amazing for modern gaming, although there are some downsides. However, Nutter acknowledges that some PVM sellers may take advantage of less discerning customers by charging inflated prices for well-worn sets.

“There’s definitely an element of hype,” says Nutter. “But a properly fitted PVM is the culmination of 100 years of analog video technology working together. It’s sharper, it looks better. The problem is that many PVMs aren’t in the best condition, which means they are not worth what people are paying for them… People come to me with damaged PVMs that they have spent hundreds of dollars shipping across the country.

Today, Nutter is a full-time CRT repairer who specializes in high-end or exotic cases, from PVMs to forgotten models from Asia. However, he also spends time tinkering with more mundane consumer models, often just for fun. His customers mail, drive, and hand-deliver their CRTs to his garage in Virginia, where he fixes an average of one TV a weekday. (Its current backlog extends through 2023.)

He documents the repair process with photos, so the customer knows exactly what he did. Nutter explains that he’s worked on too many expensive CRT sets that show signs of shoddy or incomplete workmanship over the years not to write down everything he does, and why exactly he does it. Of course, he also posts the resulting documentation on his Patreon, where he hopes his followers can learn from his mistakes — maybe even enough to fix their own CRTs without his help.

Nutter isn’t the only CRT expert trying to help others learn the dark art of tube repair. Andy King is the owner of CRT Database, a free web resource dedicated to collecting as much information as possible about these enclosures. The site offers guides on how to modify many of the most popular CRT brands, from Sanyo to Toshiba. It also features a guide to adjusting the color settings of any CRT, which is useful for any retro gamer. King likens the experience of buying a PVM to getting the keys to the Ferrari you dreamed of driving as a kid.

“None of us used broadcast monitors to play our games when we were kids,” King says. “We were using second-hand bedroom TVs…If you’re looking for an exact 1:1 nostalgic recreation of your childhood, a PVM isn’t a worthwhile investment. However, some of us are looking to capitalize on that nostalgic experience finding the best technology that can play these games.”

Desirable CRTs are often the centerpiece of retro setups, but they also work great for modern games.  However, they may require modding to work.
Desirable CRTs are often the centerpiece of retro setups, but they also work great for modern games. However, they may require modding to work.

Both Nutter and King describe themselves as entirely self-taught; after all, no course can teach you how to completely repair those old machines. Nutter says he started his journey with a scanned copy of an old PVM manual, which contains dozens of pages of troubleshooting tips. From there, he was able to learn the basics of CRT repair from old books and old personal web pages. Nutter explains that most of his work comes down to completely disassembling each case, removing all printed circuit boards, and replacing blown capacitors on each board.

“The average CRT someone brings me needs a few new capacitors, and maybe a good cleaning,” says Nutter. “There’s also the whole adjustment side, where I balance the colors and the deviation, which is how the geometry looks on screen. The average job is to go through all those steps and shoot the results. That’s basically it.”

King explains that CRTs that won’t turn on are often the hardest to fix. While it can sometimes fix them in an hour or less, a particularly nasty problem can take months to fix, especially if there isn’t much documentation.

Although Nutter’s primary focus is retro gaming, the usefulness of his expertise extends beyond that. For example, many 20th century video art installations were designed to be shown on CRT screens, sometimes an entire wall of square televisions, as in the works of Nam June Paik. That means museums have to hire repairmen like Nutter and King to maintain their exhibits for years to come. Nutter even gave a seminar on the subject at the Museum of Fine Art in Houston. He also has clients who provide CRTs as part of the set design for period dramas, such as Stranger Things, or even music videos.

Nutter says there are several repairmen who specialize in repairing these art exhibits, but most are retired. However, that doesn’t stop Nutter from calling one of them, a former Sony tech in the ’90s, for help with some particularly tough issues. “I can sit there and try to solve a problem for a whole week, or I can call him, and he’ll tell me what to do in ten minutes,” Nutter laughs. “They weren’t sharing this information about the high-end machines with anyone. It’s amazing what he knows.”

Overall, while Nutter and King acknowledge the hype and FOMO surrounding high-end CRTs like PVMs and BVMs, they both agree on one thing: if you want to play games retro, you don’t need to splurge on a desirable model. – At least not right away.

“You can get the best features of a CRT from a set you find on the side of the road,” says Nutter. “With the right console and the right cables, it can look great. No latency, a bright picture, playing the games on the hardware they were designed for. That’s really all that matters. If you want a PVM , that’s great. Just know what you’re getting into.”

The products discussed here were independently chosen by our editors. GameSpot may get a share of the revenue if you purchase something featured on our site.

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K-Art Projects USA – Subsidiary of Contemporary Art Projects USA announces participation in Red Dot Miami 2022 https://binggallery.com/k-art-projects-usa-subsidiary-of-contemporary-art-projects-usa-announces-participation-in-red-dot-miami-2022/ Wed, 09 Nov 2022 12:44:40 +0000 https://binggallery.com/k-art-projects-usa-subsidiary-of-contemporary-art-projects-usa-announces-participation-in-red-dot-miami-2022/ The five-day contemporary art exhibition owned and produced by Redwood Media Group during Art Basel Miami Week. Miami, Florida, USA – November 9, 2022 – K-Art Projects USA, a subsidiary of Contemporary Art Projects USA/Gallery, will return to Red Dot Miami, curated by Zammy Migdal. The fair is a contemporary art gallery only, it will […]]]>

The five-day contemporary art exhibition owned and produced by Redwood Media Group during Art Basel Miami Week.

Miami, Florida, USA – November 9, 2022 – K-Art Projects USA, a subsidiary of Contemporary Art Projects USA/Gallery, will return to Red Dot Miami, curated by Zammy Migdal. The fair is a contemporary art gallery only, it will be located inside the Mana Wynwood Convention Center for its third year, as part of the highly anticipated annual presentation of leading galleries and their artists.

Red Dot Miami illuminates the best of the contemporary art world. Red Dot Miami features over 75 galleries representing over 500 leading contemporary artists from primary and secondary markets around the world. The five-day show attracts over 35,000 visitors and wealthy collectors who interact with the specially curated lineup.

Our Booth R200, located at the main entrance to the fair, will adhere to our Chief Curator’s curatorial guidelines by showcasing a variety of media and styles, from abstract, geometric to figurative, painting to photography and to carvings. Due to the interesting themes tackled by the artists and the well-balanced conception of the presentation of meanings, shapes and colors, the exhibition will be attractive and meaningful for art fair visitors of all ages and walks of life. , as well as a ‘must see’ for art collectors and all viewers of this year’s Art Basel Miami Week.

The participating artists are:

The gallery will present Special facilities as Project Elena Bulatova/UNITED STATES, André Paul Croteau/USA “The African Spirit”, Carola Orieta “Rezerberation Blue”, Luis Kaiulani “White Flat-Shape and Colorscapes: Everything is Art by Chadwick Arcinue”. As special guests will have Diego Barbosa Master of Venezuela, Ruben Rodriguez/ Cuba and Pablo Contrisciani/Argentina exhibiting for the first time with us and Leo DiTomaso/Italy-Venezuela.

Among the other participating artists:

Alfred C. Groff/USA, Arnold Miranda/Cuba-USA, C.Rukenas-Burton/Australia-USA, Dale Reid/Canada, Lucienne Toledo/Peru-USA, Marina Chisty/Russia-USA, Catalina Lapiera/Colombia, Dale Reid /Canada, Erni Gunawan/Indonesia, Evangeline Ang/Singapore, Helen Lee/Korea-USA, Jindal Balesh, Katie Davis/USA, Lucienne Toledo/Peru-USA, Marianela Blasini/Venezuela, Nana SRT/Kingdom -United-Austria, Rick Midler/USA, Sara Sczepanski/USA, Sara Wight/USA, Sofia Chitikov/Russia-USA, Tatiana Zaytzeva/Russia-USA, Tom Nakamura/Japan and Maggy Grant/USA.

“We couldn’t be happier to be a part of Red Dot Miami 2021 which, together with our artists, will provide collectors with an unforgettable experience exploring world-class modern and contemporary art,” said Tata Fernandez, Director of Contemporary Art Projects. USA.

For more information, please visit https://reddotmiami.com.

SHOW TIMES AND LOCATION

VIP/PRESS PREVIEW
Wednesday 30 November | 5 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.

OPENING NIGHT PREVIEW
Wednesday 30 November | 6:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m.

PUBLIC SHOW HOURS
Thursday, December 1 | 12:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
Friday, December 2 | 12:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
Saturday December 3 | 12:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
Sunday, December 4 | 12:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.

About K-Art Projects USA, a subsidiary of Contemporary Art Projects USA

Based in Miami, Contemporary Art Projects USA is dedicated to promoting new contemporary art by providing exhibition opportunities and resources to emerging artists and curators. Their mission is focused on promoting the appreciation of art within the international community, to inspire and assist the art collecting process, and to generate resources that support the creative endeavors of artists through outreach. to art, the promotion of artists and the purchase of art.

They work with the best minds in the industry and share their experience and passion for arts, culture and entertainment marketing. From biennials and gala auctions to exhibitions and major international art fairs, Contemporary Art Projects USA has the experience, innovation and creativity to engage audiences through inspired campaigns.

About Redwood Media Group

Since 2009, Redwood Media Group (RMG) has been revolutionizing the global fine art community by helping artists and gallery owners grow their businesses through fine art exhibitions and publications, fine art business training art, mentoring, marketing and social media. Today, RMG owns and operates five art fairs: Artexpo New York, Spectrum Miami, Art San Diego, Art Santa Fe and Red Dot Miami. Artexpo New York, the world’s largest fine art trade show for 40 years, attracts more than 40,000 art enthusiasts each year, including nearly 5,000 industry buyers. Spectrum Miami and Red Dot Miami take place during Miami Art Week, an annual attraction that brings over 100,000 art collectors to the city. Over the past decade, RMG has welcomed hundreds of thousands of visitors to its events, sold millions of dollars worth of artwork, and helped thousands of unrepresented and established artists launch or grow their careers. In addition to hosting several high-end art fairs throughout the year, RMG also owns Art Business News. For more information, visit www.redwoodmg.com, www.artbusinessnews.com.

For more information contact:

K-Art Projects USA, a subsidiary of Contemporary Art Projects USA

Tata Fernandez, director
786-262-5886
[email protected]

André Paul Croteau, Sales Manager
305-613-1259
[email protected]

Media Contact
Company Name: Contemporary art projects United States
Contact person: Tata Fernandez, director
E-mail: Send an email
Call: 786-262-5886
Town: miami
State: Florida
Country: United States
Website: http://www.contemporaryartprojectsusa.com

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The Scottish artist whose work was collected by Andy Warhol https://binggallery.com/the-scottish-artist-whose-work-was-collected-by-andy-warhol/ Sat, 05 Nov 2022 06:00:02 +0000 https://binggallery.com/the-scottish-artist-whose-work-was-collected-by-andy-warhol/ Arms crossed and holding bread next to a sideboard and his plush Great Dane Cecil, “Andy Warhol In His ‘Factory'” by Horst P. Horst, is one of the great portraits of the iconic visual artist American. Behind Warhol in the photo, hanging in his wood-paneled conference room at his famous New York studio, is the […]]]>

Arms crossed and holding bread next to a sideboard and his plush Great Dane Cecil, “Andy Warhol In His ‘Factory'” by Horst P. Horst, is one of the great portraits of the iconic visual artist American.

Behind Warhol in the photo, hanging in his wood-paneled conference room at his famous New York studio, is the stunning Pre-Raphaelite work “The Wind” by Scottish artist David Forrester Wilson.

The son of a lithographer, Wilson was born in 1873 in Glasgow and was educated at a private seminary before transferring to Gorbals Public School. He continued his studies at the Glasgow School of Art from 1892-3 and 1899-1906 under Belgium’s leading symbolist painter, Jean Delville, becoming director of drawing and painting in 1932, a position he held until in 1938 before his death. in 1950.

While the public prominence of Wilson’s Scots and his works today seems to have waned, his works are in some of the most prestigious collections in the world.

READ MORE: Andy Warhol’s famous portrait of Marilyn Monroe sells for £158m at auction

Fine art specialist Luke Price works at Chiswick Auctions, where Wilson’s ‘Vanity’ sold in 2019 for just under £25,000, the most sought after for one of the Glasgow artist’s paintings since 1998.

Speaking to the Herald about Wilson, Mr Price said: ‘His quality of treatment mixed with early 20th century Glasgow modernism makes his 1920s works his most sought after, as a university professor I foresee that this affected his studio release, and makes this period of work rare. As such, his works at auction were rare at this time but highly admired and could fetch substantial sums.

HeraldScotland: “The Wind” by David Forrester Wilson (Image: Getty)

“David Forrester Wilson’s early 20th century works are among his most important, he was part of a wonderful melting pot of influences in Glasgow during this period. His style is based on the classical training he received at the Glasgow School of Arts from 1892-3 and 1899-1906 under the Belgian symbolist Jean Delville; (He became the institution’s director of drawing and painting in 1932).

“During this period, he acquired his technique characterized by bold, vigorous and painterly manipulation, this with the various influences of Delville, the Glasgow Boys, James Abbott McNeill Whistler and Jules Bastien-Lepage. His work begins to echo modernism under James Abbott McNeill Whistler in and around the city.

“An exhibitor at the Royal Glasgow Institute throughout his career, in 1919 and throughout the 1920s, Forrester Wilson presented works with the evocative titles of The Echo, The Song and The Wind. It would be this period that exposed the importance of the aesthetic ideal in his work.

“David Forrester Wilson’s known output is relatively small, but his works are in some of the world’s most prestigious collections and admired by other artists throughout the 20th century.”

HeraldScotland: A self-portrait of David Forrester Wilson (photo credit: Dunbartonshire Council)A self-portrait of David Forrester Wilson (photo credit: Dunbartonshire Council) (Image: Getty)

Andy Warhol owned several of Wilson’s works, with “The Wind” supposedly one of his favorite paintings.

‘The Wind’ was set to fetch $110,000 – 10 times its pre-sale estimate of $10,000 – when it was auctioned off with a number of Warhol ‘treasures’ in a landmark sale of its estate at Sotheby’s in May 1988, just over a year after the death of the Pop Art pioneer.

Reporting on the sale at the time, The Washington Post remarked that Wilson’s painting was “typical of Warhol’s disconcerting taste”. They wrote: “A watercolor by Paul Klee pocketed $286,000, sharing the honors of the lot with a less impressive painting by Picasso…In stark contrast to Klee’s avant-garde stripes but typical of Warhol’s disconcerting taste, the painting David Forrester Wilson’s bucolic “The Wind” sold for $110,000. , 10 times higher than its pre-sale estimate.

As well as hanging on the walls of the famed hedonistic hub that was The Factory in midtown Manhattan, another Wilson work, “Time and History,” hung – and remains – in the room’s grander setting. of Glasgow City Chambers banquet hall. . Wilson was commissioned to paint a large decorative panel in the hall in 1911, just five years after completing his studies at the Glasgow School of Art.

Kelvingrove Art Gallery & Museum is also home to Wilson’s ‘Faggots’, a work which the Glasgow Corporation bought for £150 in 1915, the equivalent of around £17,000 in today’s money.

Wilson was also a frequent exhibitor at the Royal Glasgow Institute of the Fine Arts for over fifty years, with ‘The Wind’ said to have first been exhibited to the public there in 1919, priced at £300.

Later this month, a rare masterpiece from Andy Warhol’s acclaimed Death And Disaster series is set to fetch over $80m (£69m) at auction, while the oil painting Wilson’s ‘Gathering Faggots’ oil is currently up for sale on eBay for less than £. 8,000.

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Ansel Adams signed a circa 1959 photo of Yosemite that goes for $38,750 at Holabird’s Western… https://binggallery.com/ansel-adams-signed-a-circa-1959-photo-of-yosemite-that-goes-for-38750-at-holabirds-western/ Wed, 26 Oct 2022 00:12:04 +0000 https://binggallery.com/ansel-adams-signed-a-circa-1959-photo-of-yosemite-that-goes-for-38750-at-holabirds-western/ Ansel Adams signed and framed a circa 1959 photo of Yosemite, believed to be part of Adams’ late 1950s winter snaps that led to his series of signed and numbered editions ($38,750 ).Holabird Western Americana Collections RENO, Nev. — A signed and framed Yosemite photo by Ansel Adams from circa 1959 sold for $38,750 at […]]]>

Ansel Adams signed and framed a circa 1959 photo of Yosemite, believed to be part of Adams’ late 1950s winter snaps that led to his series of signed and numbered editions ($38,750 ).
Holabird Western Americana Collections

RENO, Nev. — A signed and framed Yosemite photo by Ansel Adams from circa 1959 sold for $38,750 at a four-day Western Frontiers auction held Oct. 13-16 by Holabird Western Americana Collections, LLC , online and live in the Reno Gallery. The sale of 2,100 lots included Native American and general American products, mining, Express, numismatics, art, bottles, inventory and more.

There were five lots of framed prints by Ansel Adams (and several for pictures taken in the manner of Adams – a testament to his enduring popularity), but this was Lot No. 3022 – the big print of a snowy tree in Yosemite, thought to be part of Adams’ late 1950s winter snaps that led to his series of signed and numbered editions – which grossed $38,750, making it the best auction lot.

Headlining the auction was the third part of the Gary Bracken collection. Parts 1 and 2 (also owned by Holabird) were huge hits, and other rarities from the attorney’s collection from Ponca City, Oklahoma featured Native Americana (to include baskets and pottery), Colorado and Oklahoma tokens, foreign coins, jugs of Colorado whiskey, as well as saloon ephemera and posters.

Here are more highlights from the auction. Internet auctions were provided by iCollector.com, LiveAuctioneers.com, Invaluable.com and Auctionzip.com. Telephone and correspondence offers were also accepted. All prices quoted include buyer’s premium.

Day 1, Thursday, October 13, featured the Express and Philatelic and General Americana, sorted geographically and including various categories such as games, tobacciana and musical instruments. A Gibson Model ES175 Sunburst electric guitar with a factory Bixbee whammy bar and darkened pick guard was a real beauty and changed hands for $3,500.

Also bringing in $3,500 on Day 1, there was an original ledger containing the Laws for the Virginia City, Nevada Fire Department Governmentcirca 1862-1877, signed into law by Nevada Territory Governor James W. Nye in 1864. Also, a full Wells Fargo advertisement for Adler & Galinger Wholesale Dealers in General Merchandise (Treasure City, Nevada), addressed to James A. Read of San Jose, who was a member of the tragic Donner party, paid $2,375.

Beautiful circa 1900 Mesa Chief patterned red rug, 6 feet by 6 ½ feet ($4,000).
Holabird Western Americana Collections

A Tonopah and Goldfield Railroad lantern with the original lock and key and red embossed South Pacific globe, 10 inches plus handle and no patent information on the lamp, fetched $2,000.

Day 2, Friday, October 14, included political collectibles; militaria, firearms and armament; mining and ephemeral artifacts; and stock and bond certificates (with Colorado and Nevada mines, railroads, and miscellaneous). A Colt Lightning model carbine rifle chambered for .44 caliber on a medium frame, having a birth date of 1887 and a 20-inch octagonal barrel, fetched $2,000.

Pictorial Apache basket, 4 inches high on a three-pole foundation, having a cascading design with four crosses and eight human figures that symbolize the earth ($1,562).
Holabird Western Americana Collections

A piece of banded and dendritic gold and quartz mined from the Main Sleeper Vein in Humboldt County, Nevada, showing a fine cross-section face exposing native gold (electrum), in the quartz sequence in strips, brought in $1,562. In addition, a suite of seven different buttons, badges and ribbons from Teddy Roosevelt’s presidential campaign, including a Progressive Party button and a delegate ribbon from the 1904 Republican State Convention in Billings, ended at 1 $375.

A rare stock certificate for the Upper San Miguel Gold & Silver Mining Company (with offices in Colorado and Michigan), Certificate No. 389, issued for 500 shares to Henry Gerbs in May 1881, signed by the company’s president AT Nichols and secretary John B. Corliss, hammered for $1,220.

Day three, Saturday, October 15, focused on Art, Wild West and Law & Order, Cowboy and Numismatics (including coins, currency and certificates , medals and exonumia and tokens). Six articles relating to the Lincoln County (NM) War, an Old West conflict between rival factions that began in 1878 in New Mexico Territory (pre-statehood) and continued until in 1881, famous because one of the participants was William H. Bonney (aka “Billy the Kid”), sold for $5,000.

A letter written and signed by noted Sheriff Lawyer Seth Bullock, written on “Sheriff’s Office” letterhead and dated July 3, 1874 from Helena, Montana, addressed to Geo. Callaway (Virginia City, Montana), with Bullock thanking Callaway, won $3,250. Also, a typewritten contract from the 1908 Wild West Show signed by both William F. Cody (Buffalo Bill) and Gordon W. Lillie (Pawnee Bill), plus Ruth L. Bailey (signed by someone else) , all clear signatures, rose to $3,125.

A 1914 $50 American Buffalo .9999 one ounce fine gold coin in shiny uncirculated, like new condition from the United States Mint, in a hard plastic case, designed to look like nickel Buffalo, went to a determined bidder for $2,250. Also, a group of six chips from the town of Russell Gulch, Ouray County, Colorado, all six good for five cents each, made $2,375.

A collection of nine silver coins of Emperor Trajan (the Roman Emperor from 98 to 117 AD), two cistopphores, two tetradrachms, 2 provincial denarii (Lycia and Bostra), two Roman denarii, Pax and Spes., all good or better, went for $3,294; while two doubloons of gold escudos dating from around 1620, with a certificate of authenticity from Collectible America, found a new owner for $2,750.

Day 4, Sunday, October 16, was led by Native Americana (baskets, pottery, jewelry, rugs, clothing and artifacts, art and ephemera); saloon and brewing ephemera; and bottles. A stunning circa 1900 Mesa Chief red carpet, 6ft by 6½ft, left the gallery for $4,000.

A heavy vintage turquoise and silver cuff (probably old men’s pawns) probably Zuni (but could be Navajo), having an unusual inlay with an astonishing variety of 42 turquoise pieces, the sides hand etched with silver, costing $2,250. Also, a pictorial Apache basket, 4 inches high on a three-pole foundation, having a cascading design with four crosses and eight human figures symbolic of the earth, made from willow (or sumac) and claw of the heck, hammered for $1,562.

A Mike Fisher jug ​​(“Mike Fisher / Wine, Liquors, Cigars / Crested Butte, Colo.”), J28 in Preble, 11 inches by 9 inches, cap possibly original, with slanted shoulder, cost 2 $625.

Holabird has auctions scheduled for December and February that will feature items from the SS Central America. The company is looking for treasure-related items, bars, gold nuggets and Gold Rush collectibles to add to these sales, which will include “Land and Sea Treasures.” He is also looking for shipments from mining, railroadiana, Native Americana, numismatics and bottles.

Holabird Western Americana Collections, LLC is always looking for new and important collections to bring to market. It prides itself on being a major source of selling Americana at the best prices available, having outsold any other similar company in the last decade alone. The company will soon have its entire sales database online, free of charge – nearly 200,000 lots sold since 2014.

To consign a unique piece or collection, you can call Fred Holabird at 775-851-1859 or 844-492-2766; or, you can email fredholabird@gmail.com. To learn more about Holabird Western Americana Collections, visit www.holabirdamericana.com. Updates are released often.

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Graffiti artist André Saraiva talks to us about his treasured Keith Haring t-shirts and the art he collects for his 2-year-old daughter https://binggallery.com/graffiti-artist-andre-saraiva-talks-to-us-about-his-treasured-keith-haring-t-shirts-and-the-art-he-collects-for-his-2-year-old-daughter/ Fri, 21 Oct 2022 22:19:23 +0000 https://binggallery.com/graffiti-artist-andre-saraiva-talks-to-us-about-his-treasured-keith-haring-t-shirts-and-the-art-he-collects-for-his-2-year-old-daughter/ Much of the art world revolves around questions of value, not just in terms of appraisals and price tags, but also: what is worth your time in These Times, and your energy? , your attention and, yes, your hard-earned money? What is the personal calculation you do to determine the meaning and value of something? […]]]>

Much of the art world revolves around questions of value, not just in terms of appraisals and price tags, but also: what is worth your time in These Times, and your energy? , your attention and, yes, your hard-earned money?

What is the personal calculation you do to determine the meaning and value of something? What moves you? What enriches your life?

In this new series, we ask individuals in the art world and beyond about the assessments they make on a personal level, in art and in life.

When he first spray painted a leggy, flashing stick figure on the streets of Paris in 1989, André Saraiva had no idea that he and his graffiti alter ego, MA, would not be content to travel the world – Saraiva’s studio estimates that he’s tagged 20 Mr. Aces per night for the past 30 years, 216,000 of whom are now “running along concrete barricades and walking on surfaces ” – but also enter the world of fine art and luxury.

Mr A in Paris. ©André Saraiva.

The French-Swedish artist has since seen his works exhibited in institutions such as the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles and the Danysz Gallery in Shanghai, and even at the Venice Biennale. Yet, “the streets are still my favorite place to paint and my favorite gallery,” Saraiva wrote in her new book. “It’s free and it’s for everyone.”

Andre Saraiva: The life of graffiti, published last month by Rizzoli, features highlights of the artist’s extensive body of work, including his personal graffiti, paintings, posters and sketches, as well as his collaborations with brands from Levi’s to Louis Vuitton. He also covers his many hospitality projects, from the Beatrice Inn and Le Baron nightclubs in New York, London, Tokyo and Shanghai, to his Hôtel Amour and Hôtel Grand Amour in Paris.

<i>Andre Saraiva: Graffiti Life</i>, by André Saraiva.  © Rizzoli New York, 2022.” width=”686″ height=”1024″ srcset=”https://news.artnet.com/app/news-upload/2022/10/AndreSaravia_cover_pink-686×1024.jpg 686w, https: //news.artnet.com/app/news-upload/2022/10/AndreSaravia_cover_pink-201×300.jpg 201w, https://news.artnet.com/app/news-upload/2022/10/AndreSaravia_cover_pink-1030×1536.jpg 1030w, https://news.artnet.com/app/news-upload/2022/10/AndreSaravia_cover_pink-1373×2048.jpg 1373w, https://news.artnet.com/app/news-upload/2022/10/AndreSaravia_cover_pink -34×50.jpg 34w, https://news.artnet.com/app/news-upload/2022/10/AndreSaravia_cover_pink-1287×1920.jpg 1287w, https://news.artnet.com/app/news-upload/2022 /10/AndreSaravia_cover_pink-scaled.jpg 1716w” sizes=”(max-width: 686px) 100vw, 686px”/></p>
<p id=André Saraiva: the life of graffiti, by André Saraiva. © Rizzoli New York, 2022.

The book has contributions from Virgil Abloh, Magda Danysz, Jeffrey Deitch and Glenn O’Brien, who described the artist in a poem as a portrait (in turn, Saraiva drew the writer of art, music and late fashion): “NOT FRUGAL BUT KIND OF WASTE, ENJOYING LIFE TO THE LAST DROP BUT NO WASTE!”

Despite his “lavish” life, Saraiva continues to paint Monsieur A everywhere, for everyone, for free. Before his last vernissage – as part of the collective exhibition “Spray Painterly 2” at the Allouche Gallery in New York, which considers graffiti as a refined art – the artist, father and bon vivant based in Paris answered our evaluation questionnaire.

What’s the last thing you splurged on?

I try the opposite of splurging – I try to downsize and live a more zen and minimal life. For the past few years, I’ve been spending a lot of time in an old fisherman’s house on the beach near Lisbon, with just a few books that I like to read. If I feel a little too lonely, I will befriend the fishermen.

Maybe the last thing I splurged on was a wood stove I bought so I could winterize it.

The view of the reduced life of Saraiva in Portugal.  © Atelier André Saraiva.

The view of the reduced life of Saraiva in Portugal. © Atelier André Saraiva.

What are you saving for?

I’m saving for my daughter Henrietta, who is 12 years old. I’ve started making a small art collection for her with works by artists I like – you’ll find lots of my graffiti peers, from Keith Haring to Futura 2000. She’s already enjoying it a bit, and I I’m sure she’ll appreciate it when she’s older.

What would you buy if you found $100?

I would buy lunch for a friend at Aux Deux Amis in Paris. We would start with two small appetizers and a bottle of Poulsard.

What makes you feel like a million bucks?

My daughter’s smile when I drive her to school in the morning. He makes my day.

© André Saraiva

©André Saraiva.

What do you think is your greatest asset?

I think it’s Mr. A. He’s my best friend, and he’s become such a recognizable character that we dropped him.

What do you appreciate most in a work of art?

The life of the artists, their stories, and the force that made them make their body of art.

Who is an emerging artist worthy of everyone’s attention?

My friend Dozie Kanu, who moved from NYC to a small town near Lisbon. He makes objects that could almost be used as furniture, but he mixes the codes of our contemporary and urban culture to question stereotypes and our reactionary society.

Who is an unknown artist who has not yet received his due?

Rammelzee. He was a painter, a musician, a creator of imaginary characters and costumes and an amazing pioneer of graffiti in New York.

What’s not worth the hype?

Orange wine.

What is your most valuable asset?

My Keith Haring t-shirts from his original Pop Shop in New York.

Keith Haring poses at the opening of his Pop Shop.  Photo: Nick Elgar/Corbis/VCG via Getty Images.

Keith Haring poses at the opening of his Pop Shop. Photo: Nick Elgar/Corbis/VCG via Getty Images.

What do you think is the most overrated thing in the art world?

Art auctions and art fairs, because when you go there, you take the poetry out of the art. To me, art fairs are like appliance shows, and auction art could be replaced by any consumer product. I feel like the people there don’t care about the quality of the art, they care about the money it will fetch.

What do you think is a good cause?

The love and the future of our children.

What do you aspire to?

My freedom.

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How You Can Score Random Cheap Stuff On GovDeals https://binggallery.com/how-you-can-score-random-cheap-stuff-on-govdeals/ Sat, 15 Oct 2022 12:43:23 +0000 https://binggallery.com/how-you-can-score-random-cheap-stuff-on-govdeals/ When government agencies need to get rid of things, they auction them off. That’s what makes government auction sites, like GovDeals.com, a great place to find truly unique finds at great value. GovDeals lets you search thousands of listings in just about every category, from heavy equipment and real estate to fine art and jewelry. […]]]>

When government agencies need to get rid of things, they auction them off.

That’s what makes government auction sites, like GovDeals.com, a great place to find truly unique finds at great value.

GovDeals lets you search thousands of listings in just about every category, from heavy equipment and real estate to fine art and jewelry.

(We’re not kidding. You can buy an Ambulance or a Massive Ruby, all at GovDeals.)

What is GovDeals?

Think of GovDeals like eBay but for governments.

Once an item falls out of service, public organizations — from state colleges to law enforcement — auction it off to the public.

At the time, many agencies placed advertisements in the local newspaper when they wanted to sell old equipment or seize property.

GovDeals, along with a handful of other websites, allow governments to list items for online auctions instead, where they can reach a wider audience. All the money generated by the sale is donated to the agency.

You can find just about anything on GovDeals including exercise equipment, school projectors, laptops, food storage items, kitchen equipment, trucks, trading cards, motorhomes, Ralph Lauren wallets and hunting knives.

GovDeals has generated more than $2.5 billion in sales since its inception more than 20 years ago, according to the company’s website.

How does GovDeals work?

Like eBay, you can bid on items listed on GovDeals and there may be a reserve, even if the starting bid is really low. The user with the highest bid at the end of the auction gets the item if the reserve has been reached. You will need to create an account to get started.

You almost always have to pick up the item in person. Rarely, an agency will ship the item to you for a fee.

You can search for items by location or by product type. Each listing contains item information, including payment and pickup instructions. Read these details carefully.

Some sellers require you to pay them directly, for example, while others allow you to pay through GovDeals’ online platform.

13 Crazy, Affordable, Weird Things We Found on GovDeals

It’s hard to fully appreciate the randomness of GovDeals until you start scrolling through lists.

Once started, it’s hard to stop.

Wait, are they really selling this?

Here are 13 weird things we found on GovDeals. Trust us, there’s a lot more to do.

1. Yamaha Baby Grand Piano – $875

  • Starting bid: $1
  • Winning bid: $875
  • Sold by: University of Kansas Lawrence, Kansas
  • Delivery available: No.

Yes, you read that right: a big baby for $875, instead of thousands. This Yamaha piano plays well and was taken apart for moving. The only downsides include a few scratches, a possibly stuck sustain pedal and a missing bench. But, as the ad says, “Upright pianos are for beginners – now is your chance to have a grand piano!”

You can browse more musical instruments and equipment here.

2. Milk Cooler — $50

  • Starting bid: $50
  • Winning bid: $50
  • Sold by: Mooresville Graded School District in North Carolina
  • Delivery available: No

Need a new cooler? This Delfield 115 Volt Milk Cooler with Air Curtain is in good working order – and cost thousands of dollars new. Think of all the extra milk you can store in that thing.

If it’s equipment, you can find it on GovDeals — exercise equipment, commercial kitchen equipment, fire and police equipment, heavy equipment…

3. Seven 14k Yellow Gold Bracelets – $370

  • Starting bid: $20
  • Winning bid: $370
  • Sold by: Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts – Unclaimed Property Division in Austin, Texas
  • Delivery available: Yes, included

Fine jewelry is a popular category on GovDeals, especially gold jewelry. This lot from the Texas Department of Unclaimed Properties includes seven 14-karat bracelets totaling 11.1 grams of gold. There are some scratches and signs of surface wear, but it sold for $370 after 30 auctions.

That’s an approximate profit of $215 just based on the price of gold after paying sales tax and fees.

There’s more where that came from. To see all jewelry deals, click here.

4. Three Fitbits — $20

  • Starting bid: $5
  • Winning bid: $20
  • Sold by: Denver City and County Government in Colorado
  • Delivery available: Yes, for an additional $20

Three unknown-state Fitbits with no warranties or warranties? If you don’t mind taking a photo in the dark, you can give it a shot. Maybe one of them even works!

GovDeals offers a range of personal electronics including AirPods, iPhones, computers, tablets, printers, radios, desk phones – you can even grab a cassette player.

5. Set of 12 Baby Birthday Bear Hats – $22.25

  • Starting bid: $10
  • Winning bid: $22.25
  • Sold by: City of Bowling Green, Kentucky
  • Delivery available: No

We don’t know why the Municipal Government of Bowling Green has a dozen Birthday Beanie Babies (which sell for around $10 each) – but we’re here for it. And look, they even come in this elegant glass display case.

The collectibles category on GovDeals will raise more questions than it answers. Why is a city selling a megalodon shark tooth? How did 300 comics end up in a police evidence room? Why does an airport list sports cards?

6. Hundreds of Pounds — $5

  • Starting bid: $5
  • Winning bid: $5
  • Sold by: Berkeley County Government in South Carolina
  • Delivery available: No.

Want to fill your shelves or create a library? This lot includes 619 books, 12 CDs, 35 DVDs and a puzzle. The biggest downside? Authors, titles, and subjects aren’t listed in the post, so it’s hard to know what you’re getting.

There are a lot more than books under the educational heading. You could take home an animatron, microscope, furniture, smart board, calculators. There is also a books category with manuals, manuals and old library books.

7. 2005 Pierce Enforcer Fire Truck – $7,300

  • Starting bid: $500
  • Winning bid: $7,300
  • Sold by: Indian River County Government in Vero Beach, Florida
  • Delivery available: No

Yes, for less than $8,000 you too can own a fire truck. Obviously it’s not perfect: it has 178,201 miles on it and the pump has a leaking mechanical seal that needs servicing. But hey, if you’re looking for a fire truck…

And who isn’t, take a look at these surplus trucks.

Photo courtesy of GovDeals

8. Lots of office furniture — $1

  • Starting bid: $1
  • Winning bid: $1
  • Sold by: University of Alabama in Huntsville, Alabama
  • Delivery available: No

It’s crazy that all this office furniture sells for just $1 – well, technically $1.23 after taxes and fees. The set includes 25 chairs, three metal bookcases, 12 desks and office tables, three filing cabinets and a double seat.

Furniture abounds on GovDeals and there are great bargains to be had.

9. Oven – $1,325

  • Starting bid: $100
  • Winning bid: $1,325
  • Sold by: Montgomery College in Rockville, Maryland
    Delivery available: No

Want to start your own pottery stampede? This oven could get you started – and it sold for thousands less than a similar new one. The seller says it is in good condition “but needs a little TLC”.

The arts and crafts section is not all kilns and pottery. It’s also stickers, bowling pins, baskets and framed artwork.

10. 2005 Ford Crown Victoria — $1,125

  • Starting bid: $300
  • Winning bid: $1,125
  • Sold by: Lafourche Parish Sheriff’s Office in Thibodaux, Louisiana
  • Delivery available: No

With used car prices so high, we won’t judge whether you’re bidding on this Crown Vic with a V8 engine. It may be 17 years old with 199,277 miles, but hey, it still rides. In addition, the bodywork and paintwork are in good condition. One fairly notable downside: the powertrain control module “must be replaced at some point.”

You can click hundreds of cars on GovDeals, even the classic ones.

11. Over 1,600 bricks — $50

  • Starting bid: $50
  • Winning bid: $50
  • Sold by: Ashtabula County Technical & Career Center in Jefferson, Ohio
  • Delivery available: No

Building materials aren’t cheap these days, so this bundle of 1,680 bricks is a bargain. The bricks were used as part of an educational program. They are in good condition even if they look a bit wonky. Considering the average cost of 1,000 bricks is around $350-900, you can probably ignore these superficial imperfections.

Besides cheap bricks, you can find wood and other building materials.

12. Five mini iPads — $125

  • Starting bid: $125
  • Winning bid: $125
  • Sold by: Somerset Incorporated School District in Texas
  • Delivery available: No

Who knows if those 2nd generation iPad minis with 16GB of storage actually work. But at $25 a piece, you might want to place a bid just to find out.

Check out more iPads and tablets here.

A photo of light blue cafeteria tables.
Photo courtesy of GovDeals

13. Two cafeteria tables — $20

  • Starting bid: $20
  • Winning bid: $20
  • Sold by: Santa Rosa County School District in Milton, Florida
  • Delivery available: No

Need extra seating at your next event? You can get these two high school-sized cafeteria tables in good condition for less than $25.

Other surplus government sites

GovDeals isn’t the only game in town when it comes to government auctions.

Here are some other government auction sites where you can find great deals:

Happy bargain hunting!

Rachel Christian is a Certified Personal Finance Educator and Senior Writer for The Penny Hoarder.


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11.15 Carat ‘Williamson Pink Star’ Set Record Pink Diamond Per Carat at US$58.1 Million | Auctions News | THE VALUE https://binggallery.com/11-15-carat-williamson-pink-star-set-record-pink-diamond-per-carat-at-us58-1-million-auctions-news-the-value/ Sat, 08 Oct 2022 06:48:24 +0000 https://binggallery.com/11-15-carat-williamson-pink-star-set-record-pink-diamond-per-carat-at-us58-1-million-auctions-news-the-value/ By: Kayan Wong | Photography: Justin Cheng October 07, 2022 | Fri | 22:16 To a mixture of gasps and applause tonight, the 11.15-carat Williamson Pink Star – the second largest flawless Fancy Vivid pink diamond to ever come to auction, fetched HK$453 million (approximately US$58.1 million) at Sotheby’s Hong Kong to set the new […]]]>

By: Kayan Wong | Photography: Justin Cheng

October 07, 2022 | Fri | 22:16

To a mixture of gasps and applause tonight, the 11.15-carat Williamson Pink Star – the second largest flawless Fancy Vivid pink diamond to ever come to auction, fetched HK$453 million (approximately US$58.1 million) at Sotheby’s Hong Kong to set the new auction record for the pink diamond per carat.

Offered in a single-lot auction between two successful events, the Modern and Contemporary Art Evening Sales, this Williamson Pink Star is undoubtedly the highlight of this season. In the end, its price per carat reached a staggering HK$40.6 million, nearly doubling the previous auction record set by the 18.96-carat ‘Winston Pink Legacy’ valued at HK$20.6 million per carat.

Williamson’s pink star

11.15 carat Fancy Vivid Pink diamond, flawless inside
Estimate upon request (expected by auction house to fetch over HK$170,000,000)
Hammer price: HK$392,000,000
Sold: HK$453,223,000 (about $58.1 million)

Auction house: Sotheby’s Hong Kong
Sale date: October 5, 2022

Auctioneer Ian McGinlay pitched the bid at HK$140 million to enthusiastic bidding. The price quickly soared to HK$200 million and from then on the bidding battle was between a gentleman in the auction room and the telephone bidder represented by Patti Wong, Senior International Chairman of Sotheby’s.

The 20-minute standoff saw both sides make cautious moves. After over 30 bids, the hammer finally fell to HK$392 million, going to the ground bidder with the 8808 paddle. The winning bidder was then greeted with a round of applause; Patti Wong and Nathan Drahi, managing director of Sotheby’s Asia, even approached to congratulate the winning bidder, who was known to be a collector in Boca Raton, Florida.

Patti Wong (left), Senior International Chairman of Sotheby’s, finally gave in

Patti Wong (left) and Nathan Drahi (right) approached to congratulate the winning bidder

In auction history, Williamson Pink Star is the second internally flawless Fancy Vivid pink diamond weighing over 10 carats to go under the hammer – the first being the 59.60 carat CTF Pink Star, which fetched a record HK$553 million (US$71.2). million) in 2017.

Pink is one of the rarest colors to occur naturally in diamonds. Of all diamonds submitted to the GIA, less than 3% are classified as colored diamonds, and less than 5% of these are considered predominantly pink. In 2002, the GIA conducted data analysis on over 1,400 pink diamonds – and only 4% of them could achieve the grade of Fancy Vivid Pink, most of which are often small in size.

Not only does the Williamson Pink Star exhibit the highest grades of color and clarity, it is also a Type IIa diamond, which has achieved the highest level in terms of chemical impurities, where only less 2% of all gem diamonds fall into this classification.

GIA report says Williamson Pink Star achieved top marks in various categories

Called ‘Williamson Pink Star’, it is named after two legendary pink diamonds. The first is the famous “Williamson” stone, a pink diamond given as a wedding gift to Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II in 1947 by Canadian geologist Dr. John Thorburn Williamson.

A favorite of the Queen, the pink stone also came from the Williamson Mine in Mwadui, Tanzania, which was one of the oldest diamond mines in the world, renowned for producing fine pink “bubblegum” diamonds.

The Williamson Stone has been refined from a 54.50 carat rough stone into a 23.60 carat round brilliant cut diamond. After polishing was completed, the pink diamond was mounted as the centerpiece of a floral brooch designed by Cartier. Since then, the Queen had worn it on many occasions during her reign, including the Silver Jubilee.

The Williamson Pink Star was also produced at the Williamson Mine, crafted and polished from a 32-carat cushion-cut rough diamond by Diacore’s master craftsmen, who brought out the diamond’s most intimate beauty.

The Williamson Stone served as the centerpiece of Queen Elizabeth II’s brooch

Williamson Pink Star was fashioned into a cushion cut diamond

The second is the CTF Pink Star record mentioned above. The 59.60-carat giant pink diamond, also cut by Diacore, was sold for 553 million Hong Kong dollars ($71.2 million) at Sotheby’s Hong Kong in 2017 to Chow Tai Fook, a famous jewelry chain retailer based in Hong Kong. Until now, he still holds the world auction record for any diamond, gemstone or piece of jewelry.

As for pink diamond per carat, the previous record was HK$20.6 million, held by the 18.96-carat Winston Pink Legacy. It was acquired by renowned American luxury jeweler Harry Winston for 50.4 million francs (about $50.66 million) in Geneva in 2018.

Following the recent closure of the Argyle mine, prices for large, premium pink diamonds have surged over the past decade. Driven by growing demand and limited supply, it’s no surprise that Williamson Pink Star can set a new price-per-carat record for a fancy vivid pink diamond.

FCT pink star | Sold at HK$553,037,500 in 2017
CTF Pink Star weighs 59.60 carats

18.96 Carat Winston Rose Heritage | Sold at CHF 50,375,000 in 2018

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