Fine Art Gallery – Bing Gallery http://binggallery.com/ Mon, 26 Sep 2022 21:55:10 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://binggallery.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/default-150x150.png Fine Art Gallery – Bing Gallery http://binggallery.com/ 32 32 Spotlight: Günther Förg’s Experimental Approach to Abstraction Investigated in Munich https://binggallery.com/spotlight-gunther-forgs-experimental-approach-to-abstraction-investigated-in-munich/ Mon, 26 Sep 2022 21:55:10 +0000 https://binggallery.com/spotlight-gunther-forgs-experimental-approach-to-abstraction-investigated-in-munich/ Every month hundreds of galleries add newly available works by thousands of artists to the Artnet gallery network – and every week we shine the spotlight on an artist or exhibition you should know about. See what we have in store and inquire for more with just a click. About the artist: German abstract artist […]]]>

Every month hundreds of galleries add newly available works by thousands of artists to the Artnet gallery network – and every week we shine the spotlight on an artist or exhibition you should know about. See what we have in store and inquire for more with just a click.

About the artist: German abstract artist Günther Förg (1952-2013) produced a large-scale work that encompasses painting, sculpture, photography, drawing, printmaking, etc. Incorporating stylistic elements of 20th century formalism and informed by modern considerations of space, the artist synthesized new and old fashions and ideas into his own inimitable visual language. Förg’s work is also distinctly experimental, featuring unusual mediums and exploring various themes; one of the artist’s most notable series, known as lead paints, unlocked the potential of the chemical element as an artistic medium, giving the painted works both visual and physical weight. Förg was a professor at the Academy of Fine Arts in Munich and his work has been exhibited around the world.

Why we love it: In the monographic exhibition “Günther Förg” at Galerie Thomas, exemplary works from three decades of the artist’s career testify to his diversity and technical skill. paintings like Rivoli (1989) recall mid-century abstract Color Field painting and are juxtaposed with delicate, even romantic, landscape-inspired watercolors of the 2000s; a collection of painted diptychs and triptychs from different decades reveals how Förg returned to certain styles or formats but with ever-changing ideas and approaches. Overall, the exhibition demonstrates both the artist’s knowledge and understanding of art history as well as his mastery of traditional and modern mediums.

According to the Gallery: “As Günther Förg is certainly among the most important German painters of the last decades, we are happy to show paintings from the last 30 years which give a good insight into Förg’s pictorial oeuvre. We can present examples of his famous lead paintings (in particular a beautiful triptych from 1986), his so-called window paintings and relatively old paintings from the 1980s which reflect his approach to working with architecture and the definition of space with his painting. In particular, the large format Rivoli from 1989, which he created for a personal exhibition at the Castello di Rivoli, belongs to this group of paintings which attempt to shape the surrounding space. And, very characteristic for Förg, it combines both geometric and gestural abstraction. —Jörg Paal, Director, Galerie Thomas

See the works in the exhibition below.

Gunther Forg, Ohne Titel (triptych) (1986). Courtesy of Galerie Thomas.

Gunther Forg, Rivoli (1989). Courtesy of Galerie Thomas.

Gunther Forg, Gender Series (1998). Courtesy of Galerie Thomas.

Gunther Forg, Title (2006). Courtesy of Galerie Thomas.

Installation view of “Günther Förg”. Courtesy of Galerie Thomas.

“Günther Förg” can be seen at Galerie Thomas, Munich, until October 15, 2022.

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Where to See Art Gallery Exhibits in the Washington Area https://binggallery.com/where-to-see-art-gallery-exhibits-in-the-washington-area/ Fri, 23 Sep 2022 10:01:18 +0000 https://binggallery.com/where-to-see-art-gallery-exhibits-in-the-washington-area/ “With us, the future becomes greener.” This slogan would be more persuasive if printed somewhere other than where photographer Todd R. Forsgren encountered it: on a plastic bag floating in the ocean. Photos of this and 44 similar bags, many of which tastelessly say “thank you”, are arranged in a grid in the artist’s “A […]]]>

“With us, the future becomes greener.” This slogan would be more persuasive if printed somewhere other than where photographer Todd R. Forsgren encountered it: on a plastic bag floating in the ocean. Photos of this and 44 similar bags, many of which tastelessly say “thank you”, are arranged in a grid in the artist’s “A Field Guide to Pelagic Plastic Bags”. The series is featured in “Approaching Event Horizons: Projects on Climate Change.” Mason Exhibitions Arlington brings together thematically related works from the Atlantica Collective, a group of artists who generally have ties to the Washington area but live elsewhere in the United States and Europe.

Most entries involve photographic images, whether still or moving. Gabriela Bulisova photographed charred forests on two rolls of film which she then crumpled and digitally scanned, producing damaged images of destroyed places. Equally austere and panoramic are Mark Isaac’s photos looking up at canopies of trees against a white sky. Using color rather than black and white, Katie Kehoe superimposed wildfires over images of areas she has a personal connection to – and which, so far, have not burned. Sue Wrbican’s “Before the Ghost” sequence photos are abstract, but their bright orange swells evoke fire, perhaps of the petrochemical variety.

Wolfgang Tillmans’ 90s photo tour is a blast. But is it high art?

Closer to home, Billy Friebele has used artificial intelligence and a two-part video platform to explore the Anacostia River. The resulting photos and videos – one of which is displayed on a large low definition screen in the plaza outside the gallery – look both above and below the waterline. The AI-generated digital stills produced in the process are blurry and muddy, but oddly beautiful.

Atlantica Collective: Approaching Event Horizons: Climate Change Projects Until October 1 at Mason Arlington Exhibits3601 Fairfax Drive, Arlington.

When the pandemic forced global photographer Matt Leedham to stay home, he curled up with a good book – one he made himself. The artist from Virginia has collected some of his images in a volume, thus training in Asian papercraft and European bookbinding techniques. Some of the results are on display in “Recto/Verso,” an exhibition in the Multiple Exhibits Gallery that takes its title from the front (or right) and back (or left) of a sheet of printed paper.

Several copies of the book are on display, open to pages that juxtapose photos rhyming like “Open/Closed”; a rectangular cave portal that reveals the sky beyond (verso); and a stone-framed door blocked by a pile of stones (recto). Leedham did not limit themselves to one format, however. The show also includes photo-based scrolls, an extremely horizontal “accordion book” and several 3D “tunnel books” that allow the viewer to look beyond the exterior images to see the partially hidden interior images.

Leedham does not identify the locations of his photos, but the language sometimes offers a clue: two books on the tunnels feature panels in Thai and Japanese, respectively. The Japanese text is next to a set of train car windows behind which the photographer has inserted extensive exterior scenes. The outside becomes the inside — or the back becomes the front — in Leedham’s wittily muddled tableaux.

Matt Leedham: Recto/Verso, a pandemic in the Codex Until October 2 at Multiple Exhibition GalleryTorpedo Factory, 105 N. Union St., Alexandria.

Parts of Elizabeth Helmet’s photos are loose and flowing, smudged and dripping. Yet viewers of his Athenaeum show might rightly guess that the local Portuguese-born artist trained as an architect. Casqueiro’s designs include crisp, straight lines and crisp rectangular blocks, and some incorporate accurate renderings of classic buildings or land use plans. This architectural quality makes them compatible with the work of the venue’s other current star artist, Jean Sausele-Knodt, whose 3D wall sculptures have already been reviewed in this column.

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The style of Casqueiro opposes the soft to the hard, the line to the color and the painting to the ink. Bright hues dominate, but there are also black shapes and areas of neutral gray and tan. Flowers often appear, sometimes painted but often described with as much care as in a botanical guide. Floral shapes can also appear in more decorative schemes, echoing fabric or wallpaper patterns.

On the whole, the painting-drawings are more calculated than intuitive, but the first impression they give is quite the opposite. Careful observation takes the eye from color to shape and into compositions that are more complex than it first appears. In a sense, Casqueiro’s images are like buildings, revealing detail as they are entered and traversed.

Elizabeth Helmet Until October 2 at Athenaeum201 Prince Street, Alexandria.

In separate local group exhibitions, Korean-American artists WonJung Choi and Ahree Song explore the idea of ​​transformation. Choi won first prize in this year’s Trawick Prize, the winners of which are featured in an exhibition at Gallery B. Song is one of three artists featured in the tech-themed show ‘True and False’ of the Korean Cultural Center.

Choi’s prints and drawings are something of a joke about the history of art – or the prehistory of art. She devised a pedigree chart that imagines the offspring of two artifacts, unearthed in what is now Germany, dated to between 35,000 and 40,000 years ago: the “lion-human” and the “Venus of Hohle Fels”. Choi speculates that the mating of the angular lion-human and the bulbous Venus would have gradually led to people who look more like contemporary humans. In this scenario, the mutation leads to normality.

Song doesn’t have to guess what his evolutionary experience would look like. His “Contained Time” is a red pepper coated with urethane primer, an industrial waterproofing material, and left to decompose. Isolated from the air, the vegetable liquefies while retaining its shape and color. The result is a plastic replica of a chili pepper that’s also a real chili pepper. “Contained Time” is as shiny and shapely as a piece of pop art, yet offers an eerie commentary on science’s ability to distort organic objects.

The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards Until October 2 at Gallery B7700 Wisconsin Ave., #E, Bethesda.

True or false Until October 3 at Korean Cultural Center2370 Massachusetts Avenue NW.

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Life in wartime, as seen by Ukrainian women, in the exhibition ECSU – Hartford Courant https://binggallery.com/life-in-wartime-as-seen-by-ukrainian-women-in-the-exhibition-ecsu-hartford-courant/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 10:04:22 +0000 https://binggallery.com/life-in-wartime-as-seen-by-ukrainian-women-in-the-exhibition-ecsu-hartford-courant/ In Zhdanivka, a town in Ukraine’s Donbass region where Russian aggression began in 2014, the only place a cellphone could be picked up was the town cemetery. So Alevtina Kakhidze’s mother, who lived in the city, went there every day to call her daughter to tell her that she was alive. Until the day she […]]]>

In Zhdanivka, a town in Ukraine’s Donbass region where Russian aggression began in 2014, the only place a cellphone could be picked up was the town cemetery. So Alevtina Kakhidze’s mother, who lived in the city, went there every day to call her daughter to tell her that she was alive.

Until the day she was gone. Alevtina Kakhidze’s mother suffered a fatal heart attack in 2019 while waiting at a demarcation line checkpoint, which she had to cross to collect her pension check.

Kakhidze created a series of drawings to tell the story of his mother. These drawings are part of “Women At War,” which will be on display at Eastern Connecticut State University through October 15.

Since February 24, 2022, when Russia invaded Ukraine, the world has focused on the plight of soldiers and refugees leaving the war-torn country. Rather, the ECSU exhibit shines a light on those left behind, seen through the eyes of women, whose experiences of war are different from those of combatants on the front lines.

Curator Monika Fabijanska said her interest in the exhibit came from the “silence I hear every time I look back and look at history.

“Even when there are female characters…the perspective is usually male. And I was just interested in what would happen if we talked about war with women,” Fabijanska said. special things that happen to them.

“The works in this exhibition are not necessarily about the destiny of women. They focus on the vision of war beyond troops, battles and the concept of victory and the vanquished. They really look at the lives of ordinary people who are left behind.

Fabijanska originally curated the exhibition when she was at the Fridman Gallery in New York this summer. The Fridman presented the exhibition in collaboration with Voloshyn Gallery in Kyiv, Ukraine.

Fabijanska said about half of the works were created between 2014 and 2022, and the rest after this year’s invasion. Almost all of the artists became refugees during the curation of the exhibition.

Lesia Khomenko, who attended the opening reception, is one of those refugees. She said that in her travels, art has helped her maintain her emotional balance.

“After the invasion, I fled Kyiv. In six months, I moved 20 times. Every place I organized myself a studio,” she said. “I distanced myself from the problem. It helped me survive as a human being.

Khomenko shows four large-scale portraits of soldiers. One is her husband, who is in the army. The others are semi-abstract works that mask the faces of the soldiers with white spots or with pixelations, to comment on the Internet’s disinformation on the war.

Kakhidze’s drawings of his mother are childlike in their simplicity but tell powerful stories of wartime displacement. Its captions read “Zhdanivka has had checkpoints for two days now. … Travel within the city or to a nearby town is by passport only. The banks are closed. “It took me 11 hours to cover a distance that I covered before the war in 1.5 hours.” “So Zhdanivka was under fire. I am alive. A person died on our street, a woman.

Yevgenia Belorusets offers a series of photographs taken in the Donbass, where coal miners fought off the takeover of the mines by the military. Her photography, she says in her statement, “depicts a form of resistance to the occupation, which was politically invisible as it took place in workplaces striving to avoid any form of publicity.”

Alena Grom’s photo “Tamara with her brother, Mariinka, Donbass,” is equally dark, a haunting image of small children in a dark cellar.

A series of drawings by Dana Kavelina are rendered in pencil, with streaks of red accents, made of blood: mouths, stained hands, stained clothes.

The terrors of the past appear in a work by Alla Horska, who was assassinated in 1970 at the age of 41, presumably by the KGB. Her 1963 linocut depicts Ivan Svitlychny, who like her was a dissident artist.

Olia Fedorova, writing on sheets in red ink, expresses her fury at the Russian invasion of her hometown of Kharkiv: “May you choke on my soil, May you poison yourself with my air, May you drown in my waters, May you burn in my sunlight, May you stay restless all day and all night, And may you be afraid every second.

Other performing artists are Oksana Chepelyk, Vlada Ralko, Kateryna Yermolaeva, Zhanna Kadyrova and Anna Scherbyna.

The ECSU stop is the exhibition’s first traveling exhibition since exhibiting at the Fridman Gallery in New York. Gallery owner Ilya Fridman, who attended the opening reception on Thursday, said he hoped the exhibit would travel across the country.

“Oppressed people everywhere are denied the opportunity to record their own history, the visual and textual record of their own times. [The exhibit] will survive as proof that Ukrainians define their own culture,” Fridman said. “This war is aimed in a very real way at erasing Ukrainian culture as an independent national identity. Exposure is resistance.

Five things you need to know

Five things you need to know

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The art gallery is located at the Fine Arts Education Center on the ECSU campus at 83 Windham St. in Willimantic. It is open Monday, Wednesday and Friday from noon to 4 p.m., Tuesday and Thursday from noon to 7 p.m. and Saturday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. easterct.edu/art-gallery.

Ukrainian arts and culture, as well as aid to Ukraine, are the focus of other events in the state.

‘Volya: Free Will’, an exhibition of Ukrainian women’s art, is at Southington Community Cultural Arts, 93 Main St. The exhibition of paintings and crafts made in Ukraine by women who fled their country will be on view until to October 10. Proceeds from sales will go directly to the artists. southingtonarts.org.

Ukrainian world music quartet DakhaBrakha will perform at the Jorgensen Center for the Performing Arts, 2132 Hillside Road at UConn in Storrs, October 9 at 3 p.m. Admission ranges from $15 to $36. jorgensen.uconn.edu.

“Songs for Ukraine,” organized by the Eastern Connecticut Center for History, Art and Performance, will take place September 24 from 6:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. at The Packing House at 156 River Road in Willington. Admission is $30 in advance, $35 at the door. All proceeds from ticket and merchandise sales, donations, sponsorships and raffles benefit Direct Relief. ec-chap.org.

Stackpole Moore Tryon of Morneault, the drapers at 242 Trumbull Street in Hartford, sells Ukraine-themed t-shirts designed by Hartford artists Ellis Echevarria, Amy LaBossiere and Tao LaBossiere, with 100% of the proceeds going to to World Central Kitchen, which works to feed Ukrainian refugees. Each shirt is $25. morneaults.com.

Susan Dunne can be contacted at sdunne@courant.com.

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VSU exhibition seeks “Artists, devils and saints” https://binggallery.com/vsu-exhibition-seeks-artists-devils-and-saints/ Sat, 17 Sep 2022 23:21:00 +0000 https://binggallery.com/vsu-exhibition-seeks-artists-devils-and-saints/ September 17 – VALDOSTA – Richard Heipp enjoys bringing viewers to unexpected revelations while looking at his art. “Heipp intends that viewers initially assume they are viewing digitally or mechanically reproduced images,” according to an artist statement provided by Valdosta State University’s Department of Art and Design. « » Heipp’s work will be exhibited in […]]]>

September 17 – VALDOSTA – Richard Heipp enjoys bringing viewers to unexpected revelations while looking at his art.

“Heipp intends that viewers initially assume they are viewing digitally or mechanically reproduced images,” according to an artist statement provided by Valdosta State University’s Department of Art and Design. « »

Heipp’s work will be exhibited in “Museum Reflections: Artists, Devils and Saints,” which opens this week in the VSU Fine Arts Building.

“Heipp creates mimetic paintings photographically and digitally and he will be showcasing his recent paintings from Valdosta State University’s Museum Study Series in the Dedo Maranville Gallery,” said Mark T. Errol of the Art & Design department at SUV.

Heipp is an “artist, musician, and professor emeritus at the University of Florida,” according to VSU.

He “has had over 30 solo exhibitions and has been included in over 100 group exhibitions. He has also been commissioned to complete 20 site-specific public art projects with budgets ranging from $10,000 to $100,000 .”

He has received six Florida Artist Fellowships and received the Southeastern College Arts Association’s Achievement in Art Award. He received a scholarship from the Southern Arts Federation, National Endowment for the Arts, in painting.

“Interested in the difference between seeing and looking, and how contemporary culture consumes images, Richard Heipp creates photographic and digital mimetic paintings that intersect themes of technology, vision and artistic production” , according to his artist statement, adding that he coined the term “photocentric” to “describe his carefully crafted airbrush paintings.”

“His most recent work in the Museum Studies series confronts how the interpretation and consumption of artworks and artefacts are affected by layered visual or cultural systems of vision, their institutional display and ultimately altered by Heipp’s translation into paintings.”

Heipp said, “I hope my work inspires viewers to slow down and really watch to see.”

“Museum Reflections: Artists, Devils, and Saints” by artist Richard Heipp opens with a free public reception, 6-7:30 p.m. Monday, September 19, Dedo Maranville Gallery, VSU Fine Arts Building, corner Oak and Brookwood . The show runs until October 7. Gallery hours: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday to Thursday; 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Friday.

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11th Annual Alley Cats Art Walk https://binggallery.com/11th-annual-alley-cats-art-walk/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 10:09:52 +0000 https://binggallery.com/11th-annual-alley-cats-art-walk/ Sophie’s Gallery and Gift Shop, operated by the St. Madeleine Sophie Center, will host their 11th annual Alley Cat Art Walk in the historic downtown El Cajon Arts District. This popular, family-friendly art event will feature eight art galleries, two art studios, a museum and other small local businesses showcasing their work for the enjoyment […]]]>

Sophie’s Gallery and Gift Shop, operated by the St. Madeleine Sophie Center, will host their 11th annual Alley Cat Art Walk in the historic downtown El Cajon Arts District.

This popular, family-friendly art event will feature eight art galleries, two art studios, a museum and other small local businesses showcasing their work for the enjoyment of guests.

Guests will experience delicious food and drink, live music, fine arts, and art demonstrations while exploring the historic El Cajon Arts District. Sophie’s Gallery is an art studio where adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities have the opportunity and tools to realize their full creative potential.

There will be several art exhibits during the event, including Skate of Mind – State of Mind at Sophie’s Gallery – a collection of hand painted and mosaic skateboard decks. In honor of the annual event, a new public mural is commissioned each year. The latest mural, Butterfly Selfie l, is in Arts Alley (behind Sophie’s Gallery) and doubles as an exciting winged photo opportunity for all to enjoy.

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Event supported by

Saint Madeleine Sophie Center

619-593-2205

sophiesgallery@stmsc.org

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PERSPECTIVES: Vicksburg native Nancy Mitchell showcases her new medium at the Gore Gallery – The Vicksburg Post https://binggallery.com/perspectives-vicksburg-native-nancy-mitchell-showcases-her-new-medium-at-the-gore-gallery-the-vicksburg-post/ Sun, 11 Sep 2022 09:00:35 +0000 https://binggallery.com/perspectives-vicksburg-native-nancy-mitchell-showcases-her-new-medium-at-the-gore-gallery-the-vicksburg-post/ PERSPECTIVES: Nancy Mitchell, originally from Vicksburg, presents her new medium at the Gore Gallery Posted at 04:00 on Sunday, September 11, 2022 When locals hear Nancy Mitchell’s name mentioned, they think of art. She was an art educator at Warren Central High School for 30 years and during that time amassed numerous honors and awards […]]]>

PERSPECTIVES: Nancy Mitchell, originally from Vicksburg, presents her new medium at the Gore Gallery

Posted at 04:00 on Sunday, September 11, 2022

When locals hear Nancy Mitchell’s name mentioned, they think of art.

She was an art educator at Warren Central High School for 30 years and during that time amassed numerous honors and awards for her teaching as well as her personal work.

Mitchell has now earned another recognition. Beginning in September, Mitchell opened her solo exhibition at Clinton’s Gore Gallery.

“It’s something I’ve always wanted to do,” Mitchell said.

The Vicksburg native said those familiar with her art might be surprised at what’s on display at the gallery.

“I switched from the watercolors I had been doing for 30 years to acrylics after moving to Oxford,” she said.

Currently, Mitchell lives in Oxford with her husband Charlie, who was a former editor of the Vicksburg Post and is now an associate professor at the University of Mississippi.

Mitchell said the transition from watercolor to acrylic was a six-year process. The first three, she said, were spent deciding on her color palette, what brand of paint she would use, and “how I wanted to paint my art.”

The last three were spent enjoying his new medium.

“So finally, for three years, I like what I do. I found my own voice with how I want to express the world around me,” she said.

Mitchell, although she appreciates abstract art, has described her works as “realism”.

“I can’t do abstract art. I don’t see it that way, but I like some of the depth that they (abstract artists) achieve with all the layers,” she said.

Therefore, Mitchell devised his own method of creating layers.

“I use stamps,” she said, which transfer a pattern onto the acrylic paints. Mitchell said she will sometimes use a ready-made stamp she bought, but more often will carve her own out of wood. These patterns in the paint, she said, help give her works not only depth, but also added interest.

Mitchell said she disliked painting landscapes, preferring to paint things “up close and personal”.

“I’m interested in painting birds and animals because the expressions on animals amaze me because they just remind me of people and students,” Mitchell said.

Randy Jolly, who is the director of the Gore Gallery and taught alongside Mitchell for 20 years, said he was happy Mitchell was on display at the gallery.

“I’m very happy for people to see his work,” Jolly said. “Over the past eight years, she (Mitchell) has grown tremendously.”

Jolly said those who have been to the gallery and seen the show have been captivated.

“People respond beautifully to her work because it’s so beautiful, bright, colorful and well done. She has a really good understanding of color and design,” Jolly said.

There are 47 Mitchell artworks on display at the gallery, which is open to the public from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Mondays and Thursdays and 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Fridays through September.

A reception will be held from 2 to 4 p.m. on September 11 at the gallery, located at 199 Monroe St. in Clinton.

Jolly said the art was for sale and upon receipt Mitchell would also have prints for sale.

Mitchell was among the first high school art educators in Mississippi to earn National Board certification and was named the Mississippi Art Educator High School Teacher of the Year for 2003-2004. While at WCHS, Mitchell was a STAR teacher and served as head of the fine arts department. She has been accepted three times to present at the National Art Educators Conferences in New York, Washington and Chicago.

Mitchell has received honors at national and local art shows for works in mixed media, drawing, acrylic and watercolor. His paintings have also been accepted into several Mississippi Art Colony exhibits that travel to galleries across the state.

Mitchell was an active member of The Mississippi Art Colony, The Mississippi Plein Air Painters, The Art Guild of Oxford Mississippi, and The Vicksburg Art Association. She is also a member of the “Ladies” at the University of Mississippi, where she served on the board of trustees as vice president and president.

After retirement, Mitchell created a “More Than a Painting” art course for non-artists, which has been offered at the Southern Cultural Heritage Center for years.

About Terri Cowart Frazier

Terri Frazier was born in Cleveland. Soon after, the family moved to Vicksburg. She is a part-time reporter for the Vicksburg Post and editor of Vicksburg Living Magazine, which was awarded first place by the Mississippi Press Association. She was also the recipient of a first place award in the editorial division of the MPA’s Better Newspaper Contest for “Best Feature Article”.

Terri is a graduate of Warren Central High School and Mississippi State University, where she earned a bachelor’s degree in communications with a major in public relations.

Before coming to work at the Post just over 10 years ago, she freelanced at the Jackson Free Press. But for most of her life, she enjoyed being a full-time stay-at-home mom.

Terri is a member of Crawford Street United Methodist Church. She is a life member of the Vicksburg Junior Auxiliary and was a member of the Sampler Antique Club and the Town and Country Garden Club. She is married to Dr. Walter Frazier.

“Whether it’s staying informed about local government issues or hearing the stories of local residents, a local newspaper is vital to a community. I have felt privileged to be part of a dedicated team at the Post throughout my tenure and hope that with theirs and with local support, I can continue to grow and hone my skills by helping to share the stories in Vicksburg. When people ask me what I love most about my job, my answer is always “the people”.

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Castellani Art Museum Exhibition Celebrates Legacy of Major Works of Art | Local News https://binggallery.com/castellani-art-museum-exhibition-celebrates-legacy-of-major-works-of-art-local-news/ Mon, 05 Sep 2022 23:00:00 +0000 https://binggallery.com/castellani-art-museum-exhibition-celebrates-legacy-of-major-works-of-art-local-news/ Layla Ali. Cory Archangel. Edwin Dickinson. Harvey Brevermann. Works by these artists with ties to Western New York can be found at the Albright-Knox Art Gallery and other major collections. Now, thanks to Gerald C. Mead Jr., a patron, collector and local artist, they are also part of the permanent collection of the Castellani Art […]]]>

Layla Ali. Cory Archangel. Edwin Dickinson. Harvey Brevermann.

Works by these artists with ties to Western New York can be found at the Albright-Knox Art Gallery and other major collections.

Now, thanks to Gerald C. Mead Jr., a patron, collector and local artist, they are also part of the permanent collection of the Castellani Art Museum.

Mead bequeaths 54 works of art by 43 artists primarily from western New York by birth or residence, to the Niagara University Museum. A dozen will be transferred to his death, but still available for exhibitions.

“This is one of the greatest gifts the museum has received in recent history,” said Michael Beam, curator of exhibits and special projects. “It has broadened our representation of women and minority artists, as well as our collecting footprint, as it brings us almost to contemporary times.”

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The works, which span from 1905 to 2017, are on display in the museum until December 18, along with past works donated in “Passion & Patronage: Gifts from the Gerald Mead Collection”.






Gerald Mead donated ‘Still Life’ by Eugene Speicher, circa 1920s, oil on panel.


Niagara University Castellani Museum of Art


Mead suggested now was the perfect time to visit the museum, as the Albright-Knox Art Galley is closed until its reconstruction and expansion is complete, expected in the first half of next year.

“With the Albright closed, it’s a place where you can go see a Susan Rothenberg, a Jenny Holzer, a Laylah Ali, an Andy Warhol right now,” Mead said. “It’s the perfect time to discover or rediscover a museum that certainly deserves greater attention and greater exposure.”

A number of donated Mead works were featured in a Castellani exhibition from Mead’s collection in 2011. He has now amassed 1,600 works of art.

Mead’s other gifts include three paintings by Charles Burchfield, five works by Robert Longo, photographs by Milton Rogovin, and a painting by Elizabeth Murray.

“It really demonstrates that many artists from Western New York have become nationally or internationally known and that Jerry had the foresight to collect their works as they developed,” said Ellen Owens. , director of Castellani. “We are fortunate to have their work represented among other widely recognized and prestigious artists.”

The artwork on offer also features a number of major artists from outside the region, including Hollis Frampton and Jenny Holzer.

Mead also endowed Niagara University with the Gerald C. Mead Jr. Fellowship in Art History with Museum Studies.

Mead will discuss his donation to the museum at 11 a.m. on September 13, “CAM Meets: Lecture with Gerald Mead.”

In 2020, the university awarded Mead an honorary Doctor of Fine Arts. He holds an MFA in Visual Studies from the University at Buffalo.

Art was an important part of the life of Mead, who was born in Hamburg and raised in Boston, NY He worked as a curator and educator at the Burchfield Penney Art Museum, taught in the Art & Design department at SUNY Buffalo State College and UB’s Department of Visual Studies. He is currently an independent curator.

Mead’s own works – small-scale, detailed collages and assemblages – are in the permanent collections of the Albright-Knox, Burchfield, Castellani and George Eastman House in Rochester.







Elizabeth Murray

One of the works of art donated by Gerald Mead to the Castellani Museum is “Charlotte” by Elizabeth Murray, 1998, eight-color lithograph on paper.


Niagara University Castellani Museum of Art


Mead, 60, was influenced by prominent art museum collectors and patrons Armand Castellani, the late co-founder and chairman of Tops Markets, Seymour Knox and Charles Rand Penney.

He said his donated works aimed to fill in the gaps since Castellani stopped collecting in the 1990s.

It was at the Castellani that Mead was first introduced, as an art student, to artists such as Robert Longo, Cindy Sherman and Charles Clough.

The Castellani is an essential art museum in Western New York, Mead said, allowing Niagara County residents to see major works of art closer to home.

“It’s an under-recognized collection that has the same stature and cultural relevance as the Albright and the Burchfield,” Mead said. “Because they are a university and have a strong educational mission, my donation enriches and advances that.”

Mead said he sees himself as a steward of the artwork he owns with an obligation to ensure it will be accessible to the public long into the future.

“I never thought of my collection as something that was going to be kept private,” he said.

Five of Mead’s pieces are in the Arnot Art Museum in Elmira, four will be used in a Daemen University exhibit next week, and more will soon be on display at Niagara County Community College.







Cindy Sherman

One of the artworks donated by Gerald Mead is “Untitled (Under the WTC)” by Cindy Sherman, 1980, gelatin silver print.


Niagara University Castellani Museum of Art


Mead has 20 Cindy Shermans that he plans to make available to museums across New York State.

He has other bequests being finalized for the Kenan Center in Lockport, the UB Anderson Gallery, and the New York State Museum in Albany.

“I’m proud that he gave his inaugural gift to the Castellanis,” Beam said.

Mark Sommer covers preservation, development, waterfront, culture and more. He is also a former arts editor for The News.

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Fun, Free, and Just a Step Away https://binggallery.com/fun-free-and-just-a-step-away/ Sun, 04 Sep 2022 07:22:15 +0000 https://binggallery.com/fun-free-and-just-a-step-away/ Without the Third Friday Art Walk in Argenta, I would never have discovered Bang-up Betty. Housed in a second-floor space above Ristorante Capeo (formerly occupied by Greg Thompson Fine Art), it’s a bright boutique with unique, cheerful and affordable gifts and jewelry, mostly created by local artisans. ‘Arkansas. It’s where you’ll find hand-stamped and cast […]]]>

Without the Third Friday Art Walk in Argenta, I would never have discovered Bang-up Betty.

Housed in a second-floor space above Ristorante Capeo (formerly occupied by Greg Thompson Fine Art), it’s a bright boutique with unique, cheerful and affordable gifts and jewelry, mostly created by local artisans. ‘Arkansas.

It’s where you’ll find hand-stamped and cast jewelry, greeting cards, smart t-shirts, memorable stickers, charming enamel pins, apparel, and other gifts that support local artists.

The important word here is “affordable”. It’s the kind of store that, casually inspecting its shelves, you’ll see something that specifically reminds you of a friend, co-worker, relative, neighbor you know will be thrilled to have, even for no particular reason.

Plus: the price is right.

One of my favorite places in the store is a section of stylish, lightly worn women’s clothing. “Where do you find them?” I asked store owner and jeweler Stacey Bowers. She smiled. “Out of my closet. Luckily we wear the same size and it tastes better than mine. It’s like having a personal shopper.

In an interview with arhub.org, Bowers says she started Bang-up Betty (named after her cat) in 2013. I’m naturally one to have a nervous backup plan, so it took me many years to feel comfortable enough to know: No, I have this, this is what I want to do, this is what I need to do, and get out there and finally do it.”

His motives? “I feel like Arkansas is just a place where everywhere there’s a small-town vibe and people want to come see you in person and shop in person,” she says. “I wanted a space like, ‘Yeah, you can come here to this store called Bang-up Betty and see everything. It’s nice to finally have a showroom to display my entire collection.’

And, like most Third Friday Art Walk venues, Bang-up Betty welcomes visitors with well-behaved dogs. Like me, with mine.

Another Walk favorite, which takes place from 5-8 p.m., is across the street at the Argenta Library. Kathy Sama, the branch manager who looks after the library’s art exhibits, has an incredible eye; every exhibit I’ve seen there has been eye-opening, and the artist is almost always there, welcoming visitors and happy to talk about his work.

Additional attractions include the chance to enjoy a glass of wine, a platter of snacks, the company of welcoming staff members, and the chance to meet and greet other lovers of locally produced art.

We also like to stop by CustomXM, a digital and print marketing and design company located on Seventh and Main streets that does everything from printing your company name on a bag to coordinating direct mail campaigns, social media, emails and websites. President Paul Strack, his son Michael Strack and daughter Amanda Strack, and friendly canine companion Mottley are welcoming and good company. Examples of the company’s work are on display, and the adult snacks and drinks are great.

Other occasional art walk participants include Argenta Gallery, Arkansas Regional Innovation Hub, Argenta Counseling, North Little Rock Heritage Center, ACANSA Gallery, and Thea Foundation. Everything is free.

An Argenta Distric Art Walk Passport offers a reward for having a good time; it encourages visitors to collect stamps at each participating site, then turn in the passport at the last stop and enter a draw for a $25 gift certificate to Brood and Barley or Bang-Up Betty.

Want more? The same stretch of Main Street in North Little Rock offers Dogtown Throwdown the second weekend of every month from April through October. From Friday 4 p.m. to Saturday 10 p.m., a few blocks off Main Street cut traffic to set up tables shaded by umbrellas, as well as Baggo boards and other street games.

The many places in the area – including Cregeen’s, Skinny J’s, Reno’s Cafe, Brood and Barley, Four Quarter Bar (which serves poutine, which I fell in love with during a visit to Montreal a few years ago, as well minced pork, which you won’t find on many other menus) and Crush Wine Bar – move service outside, allowing visitors to purchase food and drinks, sit inside one of the tables and enjoy live music and people watching.

I remain a big fan of Second Friday Art Night across the river in Little Rock, with exhibition openings at The Galleries & Bookstore in Library Square, live music upstairs and local beer downstairs at the Historic Arkansas Museum (my favorite stop, especially when they’re serving products from Jacksonville’s Blade and Barrel Brewing Co.), Old State House Museum, and other participating locations in and around the River Market from 5-8 p.m.

But Argenta is closer to home. And you know where the heart is.

Karen Martin is the editor of Perspective.

kmartin@arkansasonline.com

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New Musical at OCT Tops List of Fun Weekend Events in Ocala, Florida https://binggallery.com/new-musical-at-oct-tops-list-of-fun-weekend-events-in-ocala-florida/ Fri, 02 Sep 2022 09:00:37 +0000 https://binggallery.com/new-musical-at-oct-tops-list-of-fun-weekend-events-in-ocala-florida/ “Hands on a Hardbody” The live musical kicks off the 2022-23 season for Ocala Civic Theater, 4337 E. Silver Springs Blvd., Ocala. The show runs from September 1-18. This upbeat country/pop musical is inspired by the 1997 documentary of the same name, directed by Jason Bartosic and choreographed by Greg Thompson. Tickets: $30 adults and […]]]>

“Hands on a Hardbody”

The live musical kicks off the 2022-23 season for Ocala Civic Theater, 4337 E. Silver Springs Blvd., Ocala. The show runs from September 1-18. This upbeat country/pop musical is inspired by the 1997 documentary of the same name, directed by Jason Bartosic and choreographed by Greg Thompson. Tickets: $30 adults and $15 18 and under. To purchase and for additional details, visit www.ocalacivictheatre.com or call 352-236-2274.

First Friday Art Walk

The Art Walk returns to downtown Ocala on September 2 from 6-9 p.m. at the iconic Downtown Plaza. The event takes place every first Friday in May. Hands-on arts activities and demonstrations from local arts and culture organizations, extended hours, local artists and artwork, and live music throughout the evening. Free and open to the public. For more information, visit www.ocalafl.org/artwalk or contact the City of Ocala Arts Division at 352-629-8447 and artinfo@ocalafl.org.

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‘Take 5 With Dave’ – McRoskey Reveals ‘The Art of Sleep’ »BedTimes Magazine https://binggallery.com/take-5-with-dave-mcroskey-reveals-the-art-of-sleep-bedtimes-magazine/ Tue, 30 Aug 2022 16:51:42 +0000 https://binggallery.com/take-5-with-dave-mcroskey-reveals-the-art-of-sleep-bedtimes-magazine/ Rion Morgenstern explains how art galleries inspired the McRoskey Mattress Works showroom in Las Vegas. Transcription Rion MorgensternSunset. yes, actually born in San Francisco in 1899. David PerryYou know, it looks like a carefully crafted masterpiece. Rion MorgensternIt absolutely is. David PerryWe look at the fine arts. Rion MorgensternYes, that and that’s exactly it. It’s […]]]>

Rion Morgenstern explains how art galleries inspired the McRoskey Mattress Works showroom in Las Vegas.

Transcription

Rion Morgenstern
Sunset. yes, actually born in San Francisco in 1899.

David Perry
You know, it looks like a carefully crafted masterpiece.

Rion Morgenstern
It absolutely is.

David Perry
We look at the fine arts.

Rion Morgenstern
Yes, that and that’s exactly it. It’s art.

David Perry
It’s Dave Perry; welcome to “Take 5 With Dave”. I’m in the McRoskey mattress showroom. I couldn’t say that, could I, Rion Morgenstern?

Rion Morgenstern
You haven’t done it yet, Dave. This is the first time someone has been able to say that.

David Perry
Well, isn’t it? What a great honor to let me be the only one to say this.

Rion Morgenstern
Thanks for being the first.

David Perry
Now it’s a showroom that looks like an art gallery. Tell me what you’re doing here.

Rion Morgenstern
Well, McRoskey, our tagline is The Artistry of Sleep. And it’s the art of sleep because we put so much detail into the craftsmanship and the fine detail into the product and including the cover. So we really feel like we made a masterpiece, a work of art. So when we first thought about coming to the market, we love going to art galleries.

And so we decided to make it an art gallery where instead of having art on the walls, the art was on the floor in the form of our mattresses.

David Perry
I like this. So tell me about the McRoskey line. It becomes national and what is the price range?

Rion Morgenstern
So the price range is around $5,000 to $18,000. And there is currently the Classic model. There’s a soft and a firm now we say soft instead of soft because we believe soft also means support. Where soft can make you think it’s not actually supporting your body.

David Perry
Very interesting position there.

Rion Morgenstern
It’s correct? In fact, McRoskey has been doing this for 80 years, calling it a soft mattress. So it’s not new to us. And then and then we have the Classic line, a wire type coil. And then we have the Model line, which includes five models, both available in soft and firm with a pocket spring as the spring.

David Perry
Now those are high prices. What is the market in this type of COVID economy? Good time to do this? Bad time, hard time. What?

Rion Morgenstern
It’s a good time to do that because one of the neat things is if you look at luxury is a bad term for me, but it really describes market price. We’re modest, and we’re truly one of the few American companies to make a truly handcrafted, vintage-designed luxury product.

Rion Morgenstern
So if Hastens is at the top you have several others going down. You go down from $400,000 all the way to us at $18,000, and we’re actually worth it. So even if you’re a, you know, you have to be in the bank account with those seven zeros or eight zeros or something.

David Perry
I don’t often use those kinds of numbers.

Rion Morgenstern
Neither do I. We would be considered a 100% USA domestic buy or change sourcing and would still be seen as the quality and craftsmanship they wanted. But we are also value for money.

David Perry
I like it. The showroom is spectacular. Thanks. We love the story of the sale. Great to see you.

Rion Morgenstern
You also. Thanks, Dave. You also.

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