Fine Art Gallery – Bing Gallery http://binggallery.com/ Wed, 11 May 2022 05:20:49 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://binggallery.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/default-150x150.png Fine Art Gallery – Bing Gallery http://binggallery.com/ 32 32 Young Culver City High School Visual Artists Present First-of-Its-Kind Art Exhibit https://binggallery.com/young-culver-city-high-school-visual-artists-present-first-of-its-kind-art-exhibit/ Wed, 11 May 2022 05:20:49 +0000 https://binggallery.com/young-culver-city-high-school-visual-artists-present-first-of-its-kind-art-exhibit/ Submitted by Culver City Unified School District Young visual artists from Culver City High School’s Academy of Visual & Performing Arts (AVPA) program, who are dual-enrolled in visual arts classes at West LA College, will present the first-of-its-kind art exhibit featuring their original work . Curated by artist, curator, writer, and art critic Doug Harvey, […]]]>

Submitted by Culver City Unified School District

Young visual artists from Culver City High School’s Academy of Visual & Performing Arts (AVPA) program, who are dual-enrolled in visual arts classes at West LA College, will present the first-of-its-kind art exhibit featuring their original work .

Curated by artist, curator, writer, and art critic Doug Harvey, the exhibit opens Wednesday evening, May 18 with an open house from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. in the Fine Arts Building on the West LA campus. College (WLAC). This exhibition also marks the reopening of the legendary Fine Art Gallery at West LA College with the next generation of LA Art Stars!

“This has been a remarkable partnership between West LA and Culver High. Working with these students is so inspiring,” said Harvey. This current group of students are all ninth graders. “As younger students, they are at a crossroads of unfiltered energy and gaining confidence and knowledge of art history,” he added. “They’re a great group. I just step back and lead. Even at that, they actually don’t need a lot of direction. They’re very open and curious, and so positive about life. It makes it really fun.

The benefits these students derive from working with WLAC are many, including the great privilege of working with professional artists.

“The art world is mysterious and complex,” Harvey said. “Students can interact with professors who work in the art world.”

Harvey, a working artist, who during his tenure as senior art critic for LA Weekly was considered “one of the most important voices on art in the city” by the editor (at era) Tom Christie.

“An art critic who is read nationwide, is intelligent, lively, original, has an independent open eye, a quick wit, is not dull and never academic,” wrote New York Magazine critic Jerry Saltz , and “a master of the unexpected chain reaction of thought,” said LA Times critic and Pulitzer Prize winner Christopher Knight.

The open house will feature the fabulous CCHS/AVPA Jazz Band, ceramics demonstrations and refreshments. It is free and open to the public. Come see student work and what the visual arts at West LA College have to offer. (Please note that masks are required inside all West LA College buildings.)

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Comox Valley Art Gallery’s ‘Back to the Water’ Program Concludes with Three-Day Festival – Comox Valley Record https://binggallery.com/comox-valley-art-gallerys-back-to-the-water-program-concludes-with-three-day-festival-comox-valley-record/ Sun, 08 May 2022 20:30:00 +0000 https://binggallery.com/comox-valley-art-gallerys-back-to-the-water-program-concludes-with-three-day-festival-comox-valley-record/ The Comox Valley Art Gallery’s ‘Back to the Water’ themed program will culminate in a three-day festival, May 12-14. Everyone is invited to attend the opening ceremony at CVAG Square on Thursday, May 12 at 4:30 p.m. The event will include cultural sharing through stories, songs and dances with elders, Noojim dancers Oowin and the […]]]>

The Comox Valley Art Gallery’s ‘Back to the Water’ themed program will culminate in a three-day festival, May 12-14.

Everyone is invited to attend the opening ceremony at CVAG Square on Thursday, May 12 at 4:30 p.m. The event will include cultural sharing through stories, songs and dances with elders, Noojim dancers Oowin and the Kumugwe Cultural Society.

There will also be live screen printing at CVAG Square that afternoon, courtesy of the Wachiay Screenprinting Studio. People can bring their own white cotton t-shirts and have a “Back to the Water” design added.

The festival includes in-person and live public events that are open to everyone, and some activities that require pre-registration. The CVAG website provides information on participation.

Throughout the three days, people can come and see videos on the water on three different screens in the gallery and installations of artwork by local school students and fine art students from North Island College. .

Onsite and offsite learning engagements with local school district student groups are also part of the festival.

Advance registration is required to attend the Friday evening event, Source Encounters, which will take place on Lake Comox. This partnership between CVAG and Connected By Water will include a short trip in canoes and kayaks, and artistic and cultural sharing. Visit the CVAG website for more details and registration information.

Pre-registration is required for two workshops at CVAG on Saturday. “Water In(ter)ventions” is an artistic project led by Sophia Valiant for young people from 4th to 7th grade. “Body of Water” is a workshop led by Jane Ellison, a Vancouver-based movement and mind-body workshop instructor.

Workshop spaces are limited, so please register in advance at gallery@comoxvalleyartgallery.com or 250.338.6211.

“Back to the Water” will end on Saturday with a flurry of public activities from 3 p.m., including live screen printing in CVAG Square.

“Curating Cleaner Water/Improv Shadow Jam”, an interactive walk-in activity for all ages with Jamie Black from 3-5 p.m. There will be film screenings at 5 p.m. in the gallery’s lower level studio. A sound installation and a performance with artists Renee Poisson and Francis Semple will take place on the esplanade at 6 p.m.

The festival will end with “Body Waves”, an evening with DJ Lady K live, from 6:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. on the place du CVAG.

Saturday also marks the closing day of the exhibition “Salt-Stained Streaks of a Worthwhile Grief”, a collective exhibition of the Fathom Sounds Collective.

“Return to Water” is made possible in part by funding from the Government of British Columbia’s Festivals, Fairs and Events Recovery Fund.

Read more about “Back to the Water” at www.comoxvalleyartgallery.com

art exhibition Comox Valley

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Lauren Halsey brings her vision of South Central Los Angeles to New York https://binggallery.com/lauren-halsey-brings-her-vision-of-south-central-los-angeles-to-new-york/ Fri, 06 May 2022 21:31:56 +0000 https://binggallery.com/lauren-halsey-brings-her-vision-of-south-central-los-angeles-to-new-york/ Almost every day at dawn, artist Lauren Halsey travels to South Central Los Angeles to collect items. She collects all the objects that catch her eye along the way and takes pictures on her phone. These discoveries, along with the ephemera she’s kept since her teenage years making collages (magazine clippings, church figurines, shiny aluminum […]]]>

Almost every day at dawn, artist Lauren Halsey travels to South Central Los Angeles to collect items.

She collects all the objects that catch her eye along the way and takes pictures on her phone. These discoveries, along with the ephemera she’s kept since her teenage years making collages (magazine clippings, church figurines, shiny aluminum palm trees, miniature cars, aquarium plants), fill every corner of Halsey’s studio. in Los Angeles and gradually make their way into his work.

Today, the latest iterations of those creations are on display at David Kordansky’s new gallery in Chelsea in an exhibition that opened on Friday, the artist’s first major solo exhibition in New York.

“I document intersections that I need to return to or follow,” Halsey said in a recent interview at the gallery, where she was installing the exhibit. “I have to archive this thing or this person or this place or this spirit. Some days are easier than others — I find a calling card. Other days I find an entire Sphinx. Or I find a figure that rocks my world.

“I am an obsessive collector of objects, of images — I scan the streets,” she added. “I collected as long as I could breathe.”

Dressed in a camo baseball cap, purple fleece jacket and white tops, Halsey exudes understated yet focused energy. You can see why she gets up early and stays up late – “I have so much to do” – and why a job isn’t finished until a deadline forces it to stop. “I can just carry on,” Halsey said. “I can keep adding layers.”

Through her installations, Halsey pays homage to the community that nurtured and inspired her – not just her mother, a teacher, or her father, an accountant, but the church, the convenience stores, her bus line, her loved ones and community centers. She also documents a particular segment of society, elevating an urban vernacular that is often devalued or ignored.

At a time when many black artists were recognized for figurative art, Halsey made large-scale sculptures and reliefs. And while his installations may hint at economic hardship, gentrification, or gang violence, they convey an explosive sense of joy.

“She’s not trying to unpack notions of racism, she’s just trying to celebrate blackness,” said artist Charles Gaines, who taught Halsey when she was a student at the California Institute of the Arts. “She’s trying to introduce into the realm of art things that are thought to be low culture, things that are victims of a certain stereotype.”

Halsey has achieved rare fame and notoriety for a performer at just 34 years old. His work is already part of the collections of major institutions such as the Hammer Museum and the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles; the Boston Museum of Fine Arts; the Miami Institute of Contemporary Art; and the Studio Museum in Harlem.

This year it was selected by the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York for its prestigious rooftop garden commission, but it was postponed until next spring due to supply chain issues. (The rooftop will instead be used this summer as a place to sit and snack, with local DJs hosting dance parties on weekend nights.)

Halsey has perhaps become known as much for her activism as for her art, namely the Los Angeles community center she started which has become an important food pantry during the pandemic and her policy of ensuring that some of his art is sold to color collectors.

“Lauren is a builder – a builder of art, a builder of objects but also a builder of community,” said Thelma Golden, director of the Studio Museum, where Halsey took up a residency in 2014. truly powerful combination that its deeper meaning lies.

For the Kordansky show, Halsey created vast sculptures populated with her collectibles in her neighborhood palette: hot pink, orange, green, yellow; painted boxes inspired by local signs and symbols; and what she calls caves, including one with a working waterfall that she eventually wants to bring home for the kids to enjoy.

Neighborhood is clearly the fuel behind Halsey’s work, namely the collage of symbols she has described as her own form of place-making, like advertisements for batteries or weavings.

“All of these things demystify what’s in store,” Halsey said. “It is important to archive not only the name of the business, but also the pictorial decisions they make to communicate to the neighborhood how they organize the convenience store.”

She honors the unsung workers in grassroots organizations who make a difference in people’s lives every day, calling them her “collaborators, the most brilliant models of community leadership.” Halsey mentions, for example, the Sisters of Watts, which offers after-school programs, and Vanessa’s Positive Energy, which offers dance lessons.

“People are doing the work – from providing Easter baskets to food to karate, tickets to sports games and all the support for education,” she said. “The problem is the infrastructure that makes the job so difficult. But the work is in progress. »

“They are pillars for me – they are monuments in themselves,” she added. “I work closely with them. I’m lucky.”

The people who populated his life can be found in his work, such as the mother of his best friend from Mississippi or Franco Gaskin, alias “Franco the Great” or the “Picasso of Harlem”; she used to bump into him on her way to the Studio Museum.

She described these personal references as inside jokes – “Oh, that reminds me of Sister Jenkins, oh, that’s Sister Fritz, oh, that’s Brother Washington,” Halsey said. “I can go on those tangents over and over again.”

Halsey eventually plans to bring his Met rooftop installation, called the “Prototype Hieroglyphic Architecture of South Central Los Angeles (I),” to South Central. The work invites visitors to explore the connections between ancient Egyptian symbolism, utopian architecture of the 1960s, and contemporary visual iconography.

“I just felt she had the tenacity, the resilience and the courage to deal with the institution the way Doris Salcedo dealt with the Tate; she took on the institution and everything it stands for,” said Sheena Wagstaff, Met chair for modern and contemporary art. “That’s what I thought Lauren had the ability to do – push him, probe him.”

Born in Los Angeles in 1987, Halsey originally wanted to be a professional basketball player and dreamed of playing for University of Tennessee coach Pat Summitt as Lady Vol. But she wasn’t recruited and, after enjoying creating sets for church rooms, began taking architecture classes at a community college in Torrance, California. She then spent about a year studying architecture at the California College of the Arts, but became frustrated with the stereotypical nature of the studio classes and the pie-in-the-sky shots.

“I can go crazy and do Disneyland, but that’s just not reality or where I’m from,” she said, “otherwise I would have seen it.”

Halsey transferred to CalArts in Santa Clarita, where she earned her BFA in 2012 before earning her MFA at Yale University in 2014. Seeing Halsey’s work at CalArts, Golden felt recalled: “My first reaction was total admiration.

“She was forming a deep, deep vocabulary,” Golden added. “It was rooted in his biography, his sense of place, his sense of identity. Even on that first viewing, it was clear to me that it was about so much more than that.

In 2018, Halsey was featured at the Hammer’s “Made in LA” biennial, where Kordansky was smitten with her work. “Lauren is one of the most important contemporary artists to come out of Los Angeles, California in the past decade,” Kordansky said. “She documents her birthplace, her community and her place of origin, but she does so through this extraordinary vision of Pedro Bell, who made all the early Parliament-Funkadelic records. The fantastic and the visionary rub shoulders with reality.

Somehow, Halsey managed to balance her business success with the tougher world she came from — in large part by giving back. His Summaeverythang Community Center, which provides organic products to residents of Watts and South Central Los Angeles, aims to “develop Black and Maroon empowerment”, according to the website, “personal, political, economic and socio-cultural “.

“It would be crazy for me to do this work on South Central that exists in a marketplace and not redistribute or recycle the rewards of that work back into the neighborhood and to the people who need it most,” she said. . “I can accomplish a lot in a sculpture, but it’s not a tutoring program, it’s not a food program.”

She also said she doesn’t see her neighborhood through “the prism of darkness or constant trauma.” On the contrary, says Halsey, she sees her beauty and her humanity: the fertile ground she continues to tap into as an artist.

Halsey counts artists Betye Saar, Overton Loyd, Mike Kelley, Dominique Moody and Mark Bradford among her biggest influences. Ultimately, she says, the art for her is about going “deep into what matters to me,” which she said singer and entertainer George Clinton calls “going for your funk.”

But don’t ask him to explain exactly what funk means. “I wouldn’t define it, because once you define it, it’s dead — you locked it in, you flattened it,” Halsey said. “It’s an energy, it’s a life force, it’s something I look for every day.”

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Art in Bloom at the Port Angeles Fine Arts Center https://binggallery.com/art-in-bloom-at-the-port-angeles-fine-arts-center/ Wed, 04 May 2022 08:30:00 +0000 https://binggallery.com/art-in-bloom-at-the-port-angeles-fine-arts-center/ PORT ANGELES — A flower bar, pansy planting station and brand new mural will be part of Art in Bloom, the annual exhibit opening this weekend at the Port Angeles Fine Art Center, 1203 E. Lauridsen Blvd. Admission is free to the display of freshly-arranged flowers, each inspired by artwork from PAFAC’s ‘Science Stories’ exhibition. […]]]>

PORT ANGELES — A flower bar, pansy planting station and brand new mural will be part of Art in Bloom, the annual exhibit opening this weekend at the Port Angeles Fine Art Center, 1203 E. Lauridsen Blvd.

Admission is free to the display of freshly-arranged flowers, each inspired by artwork from PAFAC’s ‘Science Stories’ exhibition.

Art in Bloom will be on display in the Esther Webster Gallery downtown from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.

Another fresh piece of art is also taking shape: a pop-up mural by Port Angeles illustrator Cammry Lapka. She turns the piece of plywood covering the center front window frame – where a burglar broke the window in April – into her art canvas.

“When we realized that replacing the glass might take some time, we decided to reach out to local artists to see if we could bring some creative ingenuity to the problem of unsightly plywood,” said Christine Loewe, Executive Director of the Center. Sunday.

“She’s been volunteering her time and artistic skills this week,” Loewe said, adding that Lapka has been painting for three days.

Four artists’ books from the “Science Stories” exhibit were stolen in the break-in, Loewe said, along with specimens from the Slater Museum of Natural History component of the exhibit.

“We were able to rearrange and still have full exposure,” Loewe said.

The arts center did not interrupt its opening hours after the burglary, she added.

Loewe came to work on Monday morning April 18 to find the window smashed and was able to open the gallery later in the week for its usual hours of 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday through Sunday.

Loewe, along with center staff and volunteers, created two new activities for this year’s Art in Bloom. First of all, the flower bar is for those who want to try their hand at making flower arrangements in the PAFAC courtyard.

Tickets include a container, locally grown flowers, all necessary tools and basic instructions to create an arrangement to take home. Advance purchase is recommended at https://pafac.kindful.com/e/flowerbar, as the activity will only be open from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. this Saturday.

Tickets are $30 for PAFAC members and $35 for the general public, with proceeds going to local flower growers and arts center programming.

For children, the Plant-a-Pansy station will be open from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday. Kids 12 and under can decorate their own miniature pots and learn how to plant flowers. There is no cost to participate; the Airport Garden Center donated flowers for the planting station.

All this is part of a spring tradition at PAFAC. Art in Bloom, launched in 2004, was the vision of dedicated board member and volunteer Mim Foley, who attended the event until his untimely death in 2010.

On May 5 of that year, just after Mother’s Day, Foley died in a car crash a block from the arts center. Foley’s husband, Bud, along with their family and friends, established a memorial fund to ensure the continuity of Art in Bloom. Bud passed away in 2016, but Art in Bloom continued.

Loewe expressed his gratitude to the variety of people supporting Art in Bloom this spring: the Port Angeles Garden Club, a longtime partner, as well as Tin Can Floral, River’s Edge Farmstead and the Airport Garden Center, who shared flowers and floral motifs with PAFAC.

Members of the Olympic Peninsula Board of Judges of the Washington State Federation of Garden Clubs are participating in this year’s Art in Bloom main event, including Pamela Ehtee, Billie Fitch, Bernice Cook, Patty Wheatley, Tina Cozzolino, Mary Lou Paulson and Linda Nutter. All hold certificates in floral design and judgment.

Designers Julia Ahrndt, Jenny Edwards and Sandy Giles of Tin Can Floral and River’s Edge Farmstead will also exhibit their designs in the gallery.

Foley’s daughter, Irene Alltucker, reiterated her hopes for this weekend’s event.

“My mom wanted to spend Mother’s Day weekend with a family activity that combined her two great loves: gardening and the Port Angeles Fine Arts Center,” Alltucker said.

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Jefferson County Senior Reporter Diane Urbani de la Paz can be reached at 360-417-3509 or durbanidelapaz@peninsuladailynews.com.

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Parking activation: is it art? https://binggallery.com/parking-activation-is-it-art/ Sun, 01 May 2022 23:00:32 +0000 https://binggallery.com/parking-activation-is-it-art/ Color blocking in car parks is a pervasive form of wayfinding that we subconsciously register – Yellow = Level 3. But what if these incredibly heavy traffic areas were a little more creative in engaging their captive audience? This is not a new idea; but we’d like to think it was one that’s ripe to […]]]>

Color blocking in car parks is a pervasive form of wayfinding that we subconsciously register – Yellow = Level 3. But what if these incredibly heavy traffic areas were a little more creative in engaging their captive audience?

This is not a new idea; but we’d like to think it was one that’s ripe to grow.

An Australian art company working in this area is Art Pharmacy. They draw on their experience working with developers and consultants and push the idea that car parks can also be “cultural parks”, capturing visitors earlier in their journey and destination narrative.

ArtsHub caught up with one of their project managers, Brunella Muddle, who said that “the artwork created for the parking stations is definitively public art.

She added that “while murals are great, there’s also a lot more you can do to activate these spaces after hours.”

What drives parking activations?

In the City of Sydney, any development project over $10 million is encouraged to devote 1% of its budget to public art. “It’s not enforceable, only recommended,” Muddle said, “but the City of Sydney is very strict in encouraging it and has a great public art panel.”

Other cities have similar programs. Muddle said, “With public art, it has to be in a place where the public can access it. Sometimes parking lots are not [accessible]but you should not rule out optional car parks.

Why? Parking lots have very little visual competition; they have a captive audience and an ingrained history of visual orientation that can be easily expanded.

“Artists started the trend by activating parking lots. A lot has been done in London, like the Brewery Street car park. What’s great about them is that they [can also] become event spaces – they are the perfect blank canvas for art and events, and they lend [themselves] to digital projection and performance.

“While murals are the most popular, I think parking lot activations can go way beyond that,” Muddle told ArtsHub.

Newtown car park mural in progress. Artist Nikita Abramov; customer / location Secure parking. Picture provided.

What works best?

A clue to what works best is the success of orientation modes and a long tradition of wall art.

Muddle says that obviously graphically bold designs are the best, but adds: “I think some kind of community or local element that connects the design to the area – whether abstract or more literal in design – can also succeed.”

Whenever possible, Art Pharmacy has chosen to pair local artists with the project. An example is a recent car park project carried out in the Sydney suburb of Newtown. Muddle said the site was very dark and safety was a key priority for the commission.

“A lot of times the goal has been to light up the space, which leads to the idea that people feel safe – safety is important when it comes to car parks – so there’s usually the use of color in the brief. Sometimes the idea of ​​’presenting a community’ is in the brief and creating an unexpected surprise,” she explained.

Muddle said designs that extend beyond an area — like the elevator lobby, wrap around columns, or ascend stairwells — are also a great way to engage captive audiences.

Elevator shaft created by artist Claire Nakazawa. Photo Terence Chin.

She described an April Group project for their new building, Habitat House in Surry Hills (2020), where artist Claire Nakazawa worked after hours, slowing down the painting of the elevator shaft over a two-week period .

It was one of those amazing spaces; it’s not planned.

Brunella Muddle, Art Pharmacy

“This work of art is a fresco of moving images. It explores how colours, shapes and textures change as one travels through the levels of the elevator. The mirrored ceiling enhances the artwork, creating symmetry by mirroring the design above the traveler’s head. This site-specific mural provides a glimpse into an often invisible space,” Nakazawa said of the project.

Emilya Colliver, founded by Art Pharmacy, added: “Our challenge was to find a muralist who could not only design flexible, site-specific artwork, but also someone who was equally comfortable sitting atop of an elevator in a confined space for countless nights to paint the work directly on the surface of the raw cement.’

Muddle said she felt developers and boards were increasingly interested in the trend, and there was an opportunity for artists here.

Longevity, maintenance and contracts

Muddle says any public artwork commissioned should come with a maintenance manual as part of the project. Similarly, any mural ordered is finished with an anti-graffiti coating.

She added that one of the benefits of the car parks is that “because they’re indoors, they’re not as exposed to the elements”, adding that due to their rough construction, “sometimes we have to pass a little extra time to ensure the walls are prepared properly.

“Murals in the workplace are certainly on the rise as well, especially post-COVID. Companies want to attract people with this commitment. We also see that they want to do a launch when it’s done, with an artist talk to bring employees together. I noticed [recent commissions] are definitely not just about the art, but how they can engage people, especially once it’s done,” she continued.

“Some even wanted to involve them in the process of developing the work, inviting employees to contribute to the concept [ideas].’

And, like any other commissioned artwork, Muddle says that in any parking activation contract, there is “usually an alienation clause in the client contract, which [requests] they consult with us if they are considering removing the artwork, so that we can advise the artist.

The global trend of car park activation

The reactivation of these multistory sites has been a growing trend over the past decade. Some of the best known examples are:

Soho’s 1930s art deco Brewer Street parking lot, which in recent years has quietly reinvented itself as a major cultural hub, hosting audio-visual art exhibits hosting immersive activations by artists such as American Bill Viola, Japanese Ryoyi Ikeda, Richard Mosse, and German artists Carsten Nicolai, and since 2015 the British Fashion Council has moved London Fashion Week to the parking lot.

Another is Peckham Levels (in south London), designed in the 1980s but reimagined as a hybrid cultural venue in 2008 by gallerist Hannah Barry, with the company co-founded and designed by Carl Turner Architects. They have transformed the top three floors into a sculpture park and event space that comes alive from June to September each year.

And, demonstrating how far the parking activation concept can go, there are a number of international examples where architects have taken the adaptation of the “blank canvas” and incorporated this thinking “from parking lot to cultural park ” in the planning, well before the ground. was even broken on construction.

1111 Lincoln Road was designed by Herzog & de Meuron for developer Robert Wennett. Photo: Hufton & Crow

Designed by award-winning architects Herzog & de Meuron, 1111 Lincoln Road in Miami (USA) was envisioned from the outset as “a cultural blueprint where people can produce culture” by developer Robert Wennett. It combines parking with retail outlets, a yoga studio, event spaces and rooftop restaurants. It opened in 2010.

“I had the opportunity to change people’s perception of what parking is and build a type of building that becomes a social gathering space and a public space,” Wennett told Dezeen.

And like 1111 Lincoln Road, the Z in downtown Detroit (USA) was designed as a “destination” from the start. In addition to its 1,287 parking spaces, it includes 34,000 square feet of commercial and mixed-use space. Twenty-seven international artists were commissioned to transform the interior walls of The Z, a space dedicated to the arts called “The Belt”.

It’s a creative collaboration between Detroit’s Library Street Collective art gallery and Dan Gilbert’s Bedrock Company – major players in the Detroit real estate scene – and opened in 2014.

The Euratlantique car park in Bordeaux (France) is another example, designed by the architect Brisac Gonzales. He says: “In many cases car parks sit idle after hours, creating dead zones of activity. Euratlantique rebalances this day/night balance.

From establishment to ARI (Artist Run Initiatives), another example has been Parking Project in Berlin, led by Australian artist Scott Chaseling, and of course the five-year success of Alaska Projects (2011-2016, when it has been re-imagined in a display case) located in a Kings Cross parking lot in Sydney run by curator Sebastian Goldspink. Various projects in Western Sydney by C3West and Pari in Parramatta have also used car parks for pop-up artwork and performances.

Keep your eyes peeled for more examples, or better yet approach your local council and help spread the trend.

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There’s no place for mediocrity at LU’s student art exhibit https://binggallery.com/theres-no-place-for-mediocrity-at-lus-student-art-exhibit/ Fri, 29 Apr 2022 09:01:24 +0000 https://binggallery.com/theres-no-place-for-mediocrity-at-lus-student-art-exhibit/ Over the next few days, the public is invited to discover the talents of several Lincoln University art students. LU’s annual student art exhibition opened on Thursday with an awards ceremony recognizing top students for their work. This is the first student exhibition for a few years, as restrictions related to the COVID-19 pandemic prevented […]]]>

Over the next few days, the public is invited to discover the talents of several Lincoln University art students.

LU’s annual student art exhibition opened on Thursday with an awards ceremony recognizing top students for their work. This is the first student exhibition for a few years, as restrictions related to the COVID-19 pandemic prevented LU from organizing the event.

The instructors judged the work; winners received certificates and cash prizes were awarded to the top prizes.

Junior Stephanie Layton, who grew up in Linn, was among the winners. She is working on getting an arts education degree. It was his first exhibition; it had seven exhibits.

“It was humbling to see my work up there because I worked so hard on all those pieces, and now I can see them,” Layton said.

The art that the students produced included paintings, drawings, and sculptures.

“Art was a way for me to express how I felt when I was growing up, and I found I could capture something no one else could see,” Layton said. “In my paintings, it’s really cool because when I look at the study of what I want to paint, I can see different shades of blues and browns. I try to explain that to people and most say: “It just looks like one color to me. I see thousands of colors, and it’s really nice to replicate that.”

Another winner was Doug Kaylor of Jefferson City. He is 70 and said he knew he wanted to explore his artistic side after retiring from working for the state.

“The last few years I was working, I started stocking up on supplies,” Kaylor said with a laugh. “It’s been a really good experience. I’m just having fun. I’ve done art as a volunteer, but I’ve always wanted to go a little further.”

Kaylor, who exhibits several pieces, said he was satisfied with the result.

“I can see where maybe I should have done something a little different, but my instructor (Essex Garner) just says, ‘Forget it,'” Kaylor said with a laugh.

One of the pieces for which Kaylor received an award was a self-portrait. When presenting the award, Garner joked with Kaylor, “Oh the rabbit hole we went down when you did that.”

Sophomore Alayna Seeney of Jefferson City has won several awards for her work. When she was growing up, she wanted to be a fashion designer. As he grew older, his parents, seeing his talent, encouraged him to pursue art.

“I got to work with some great teachers here, and I won those awards, so I was like, ‘Wow, I guess I’m really good at this,'” Seeney said.

Garner was proud of the students who had their work on display and said, “I don’t tolerate mediocrity. A lot of students don’t have their work here. They were turned away.

“You don’t teach them to sustain, you teach them to excel,” Garner added.

Those wishing to view pieces from this year’s exhibition can visit the second floor of the Richardson Fine Arts Center on East Dunklin Street. Gallery hours are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. through May 7.


Julie Smith/News Tribune Lincoln University sophomore Alayna Seeney, left, explains to her younger sister Alexis how she created the artwork for which she was recognized during an award ceremony price Thursday. LU hosted the annual event Thursday at the gallery at the Richardson Fine Arts Center.


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Artist Barbara Morse ‘Life Re-imagined’ on display at the Levy Gallery https://binggallery.com/artist-barbara-morse-life-re-imagined-on-display-at-the-levy-gallery/ Wed, 27 Apr 2022 18:08:15 +0000 https://binggallery.com/artist-barbara-morse-life-re-imagined-on-display-at-the-levy-gallery/ PORTSMOUTH — New Hampshire Art Association artist Barbara Morse will exhibit her work in an exhibition called “Life Re-imagined” at the Robert Lincoln Levy Gallery in May. Morse has developed her own style of graphite drawing which she calls “In Sharp Focus”. Indeed, those looking at her work could easily get lost looking at all […]]]>

PORTSMOUTH — New Hampshire Art Association artist Barbara Morse will exhibit her work in an exhibition called “Life Re-imagined” at the Robert Lincoln Levy Gallery in May.

Morse has developed her own style of graphite drawing which she calls “In Sharp Focus”. Indeed, those looking at her work could easily get lost looking at all the detail she puts into her pieces.

“I create the art, but…the viewer creates their own story,” Morse said.

Originally from Connecticut, receiving her formal art training at the Paire College of Art in New Haven, Morse is now a longtime New Hampshire resident residing in Amherst.

Early in her career as an illustrator, she had a vision that her designs could be more dynamic when created as works of art; and she was able to pursue her passion for working primarily in graphite, while developing a style she considered unique and challenging.

Over time, the work has been refined by adding splashes of color to the acrylic to draw attention to a part that enhances the whole image.

As her work became established, she was a member of the Salmagundi Club in New York, the New Hampshire Art Association, and the Copley Society in Boston, where she attained the level of Copley Artist.

“Working in graphite and sometimes adding a splash of color to draw attention to an area enhancing the whole image, no matter how hard the work, I find joy and satisfaction in watching a piece come to life in front of me,” Morse said.

“My reward, however, is not for the viewer to see the work through my eyes, but theirs – creating a personal and lasting image to be seen and shared in a timeless way,” she added.

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Must-See Exhibits at Baltimore’s Gallery Blue Door https://binggallery.com/must-see-exhibits-at-baltimores-gallery-blue-door/ Mon, 25 Apr 2022 17:15:59 +0000 https://binggallery.com/must-see-exhibits-at-baltimores-gallery-blue-door/ The Baltimore Museum of Art is the world’s foremost repository of the work of French modern master Henri Matisse and this fall a new exhibition will explore the friendship between the artist and Etta Cone, the Baltimore collector who became befriended Matisse in 1906. The two maintained a close friendship spanning 43 years, during which […]]]>

The Baltimore Museum of Art is the world’s foremost repository of the work of French modern master Henri Matisse and this fall a new exhibition will explore the friendship between the artist and Etta Cone, the Baltimore collector who became befriended Matisse in 1906.

The two maintained a close friendship spanning 43 years, during which time Matisse traveled to Baltimore and created works with Etta and the BMA in mind. Etta and her sister Claribel eventually collected around 700 works by Matisse, according to the BMA, including Blue Nude (1907), The Yellow Dress (1929-31) and Large Reclining Nude (1935).

This new exhibition, “A Modern Influence: Henri Matisse, Etta Cone and Baltimore” will trace their friendship through the letters they exchanged and includes more than 160 paintings, sculptures, prints, drawings and illustrated books.

Etta cone (Photo courtesy of Claribel Cone and Etta Cone Papers, Archives and Manuscripts Collections, The Baltimore Museum of Art)

“For years, scholars have debated the purchases made by the two Cone sisters, with much more credit given to the important major painting acquisitions of the older sister Claribel,” the BMA said in a statement. “‘Modern Influence: Henri Matisse, Etta Cone, and Baltimore’ will for the first time fully recognize Etta’s achievements as a collector and acknowledge her role in building the majority of the sisters’ Matisse collection, particularly sculpture , drawings and prints.”

Henri Matisse in the dining room of Etta Cone’s Baltimore apartment, 1930. (Photo courtesy of Claribel Cone and Etta Cone Papers, Archives and Manuscripts Collections, The Baltimore Museum of Art)

“Etta Cone and Matisse shared a love of gesture and the female form, expressed not only through her collection of her major paintings, but through an early and sustained interest in her printmaking and drawing practices. The exhibition begins with work on paper and ends there as well,” said Leslie Cozzi, Associate Curator of Prints, Drawings and Photographs at the BMA.

The exhibition will feature a wide selection of drawings, including masterpieces that are rarely displayed due to light exposure restrictions, the BMA said.

“Etta Cone’s dedication to art, and to the work of Matisse in particular, has had a profound impact on the BMA and the focused and considered way in which the museum continues to grow its collection. The upcoming exhibition captures the exciting possibilities that can be realized when artists, collectors and public institutions come together in a shared vision and commitment. We are delighted to introduce visitors to the incredible story of Etta Cone and the significant works of art she brought to our museum, and to make this exhibition a prelude to the presentations, programs and publications that we may create through at our soon-to-open Ruth R. Marder Center for Matisse Studies,” said BMA Director Dorothy Wagner Wallis Christopher Bedford.

Henri Matisse. The yellow dress. 1929-31. (The Baltimore Museum of Art: The Cone Collection, formed by Dr. Claribel Cone and Miss Etta Cone of Baltimore, Maryland. BMA 1950.256 © Succession H. Matisse, Paris/Artists Rights Society (ARS) New York)

The Marder Center, slated to open in December, will showcase the breadth of the BMA’s Matisse holdings, while supporting the development of new scholarly publications that advance discussions about the trajectory of modern art, according to a statement.

“A Modern Influence: Henri Matisse, Etta Cone, and Baltimore” opens October 3 and will be on view through January 2, 2022. Tickets are available at artbma.org. Prices are $15 for adults, $13 for seniors, $12 for groups of 7 or more, $5 for students with ID, and $5 for youth ages 7-18. BMA members, children 6 and under and student groups are admitted free. For more information, call 443-573-1701.

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‘I am first an activist, then an artist’ | Print edition https://binggallery.com/i-am-first-an-activist-then-an-artist-print-edition/ Sun, 24 Apr 2022 00:57:34 +0000 https://binggallery.com/i-am-first-an-activist-then-an-artist-print-edition/ Chandraguptha Thenuwara talks to Anoushka Jayasuriya about her exhibition at the prestigious Venice Biennale Views) : ‘Covert’: Thenuwara with her wireframe installation at the Venice Biennale This is only the third time that a Sri Lankan artist has been presented at the prestigious Venice Biennale, and this time the honor goes to renowned artist Chandraguptha […]]]>

Chandraguptha Thenuwara talks to Anoushka Jayasuriya about her exhibition at the prestigious Venice Biennale

Views) :

‘Covert’: Thenuwara with her wireframe installation at the Venice Biennale

This is only the third time that a Sri Lankan artist has been presented at the prestigious Venice Biennale, and this time the honor goes to renowned artist Chandraguptha Thenuwara who will represent the country with his installation as part of the exhibition. “Personal Structures” presented by the European Cultural Center (ECC) Venice.

The 2022 Venice Biennale, an international exhibition of contemporary art held every two years in Italy, opened on April 23 and runs for seven months ending on November 27. Since 2011 the ECC has presented artists who break all ideological, political and geographical barriers and this year has 192 artists from 51 countries whose work will be presented in three historic Venetian venues – Palazzo Bembo, Palazzo Mora and the Marinaressa gardens, in the heart of the city.

“My works are a response to my social, cultural and political environment,” says Thenuwara whose sculpture for the Venice Biennale titled “Covert” is an installation described as “an endless vortex of interlocking patterns constructed from threads that bind and merge”. .

Thenuwara told The Sunday Times that his inspiration prompted him to criticize officials’ use of religious extremism and militarization to gain power. Among the representative images he used in this installation is the lotus: “This innocent symbol that belonged to a personal space was used by politicians for political purposes. It used to be a white lotus representing peace but this lotus that I incorporate into my work is a symbol of power.

The installation shows four hidden figures of soldiers bearing arms and standing to attention while saluting – the barbed wire is used in reference to the final stages of the conflict in 2009. “The barbed wire and the divisions have been there for so long that it has become confused with thorns in nature: natural barriers.This work symbolizes my critique of war and the continued marginalization of non-Sinhalese Buddhist communities, representing a range of unresolved grievances.

The central theme of the Venice Biennale this year is that of reflections, precisely “which embodies the double meaning of a visible episode perceived by the eyes and of a mental act resulting from the action of thinking and meditating with the mind “. Thenuwara shares that he started working on “Covert” last year and started building the installation in February this year, adding that his work has been impacted by the current situation prevailing in the country. “My works are essentially a reflection of what is happening locally. After all, I am above all an activist.

Speaking about the potential of art to bring about social change, Thenuwara again referenced the current crisis saying, “Look at Galle Face. It is the art of the people. It is a performance for greater change. They suffer but they sing, play and shout; it’s all a form of artistic expression. Projections on building, visual messages; it’s all contemporary art. The symbolism they carry is made by artists; when something happens through change, it’s better to speak through art than to use “political” language, and that’s why politicians are afraid of art. Sometimes people are also afraid of art because of its power. As Joseph Beuys says; ‘Each man[woman] is an artist.

As an artist at the Saskia Fernando Gallery, where much of her work has been exhibited throughout her career, Thenuwara says her relationship with the gallery is “also a political act.” “It’s a local gallery immersed in the political culture of Sri Lanka and its politics and I think that relationship is very important.” Also presented this year at the Venice Biennale and represented by the Saskia Fernando gallery, the Belgian artist Saskia Pintelon has taken up residence in Sri Lanka.

During his decades-long career, Thenuwara, originally from Galle, has drawn attention to the depiction of contemporary events through symbolism and ideas that deal with the country’s political landscape, human rights, conflicts and difficulties. In 1997, the artist began presenting his self-organized memorial exhibitions, held annually on July 23 to commemorate the “Black July” riots of 1983. The shows began with a series titled “Barrelism,” which included a a number of works where Thenuwara depicted the growing militarization of the country with a series of barrels in various mediums, which were seen at barricades and checkpoints across the country.

Thenuwara first studied painting at the Institute of Aesthetic Studies at Kelaniya University before continuing his studies at the Surikov State Art Institute in Moscow, Russia. He followed this with an MPhil at the Post Graduate Institute of Archeology (PGIAR) at Kelaniya University in 2006. In 1993 he founded the Vibhavi Academy of Fine Arts (VAFA), an art school artist-led alternative. He is currently a professor in the Department of Art History and Theory of the University of Visual and Performing Arts and Director of the Internal Quality Assurance Unit of the University of Visual and Performing Arts in Colombo.

Thenuwara’s work has been exhibited locally and internationally since 1978 and is in the collections of Queensland Art Gallery Australia, Fukuoka Asian Art Museum Japan, John Moore’s University Art Collection Liverpool and the Fine Arts Museum of Udmurtia, Izhevsk, Russia. He also created public monuments such as the Seeduwa monument to the missing and the monument to Neelan Thiruchelvam in Kynsey Terrace, Colombo.

Thenuwara’s installation is at the European Cultural Center – Palazzo Mora, Strada Nova, Venice.

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Outdoor Exhibit Returns to Joshua Tree, California’s Desert Art Boom https://binggallery.com/outdoor-exhibit-returns-to-joshua-tree-californias-desert-art-boom/ Thu, 21 Apr 2022 16:51:36 +0000 https://binggallery.com/outdoor-exhibit-returns-to-joshua-tree-californias-desert-art-boom/ In the popular imagination, the desert is a wasteland, conducive to post-apocalyptic stories such as the madmax movies. Some artists living and working in the Southern California desert would dispute this notion and instead believe that a creative narrative can be drawn from its open spaces, its history, and even its inhospitable surroundings. High Desert […]]]>

In the popular imagination, the desert is a wasteland, conducive to post-apocalyptic stories such as the madmax movies. Some artists living and working in the Southern California desert would dispute this notion and instead believe that a creative narrative can be drawn from its open spaces, its history, and even its inhospitable surroundings. High Desert Test Sites (HDTS), a project that inspired a generation of visitors and emulators seeking art and revelation in the desert, has just launched its latest iteration, Researchers (until May 22), with nine art installations dotting the high desert region around Joshua Tree, California.

Celebrating its return to live programming and its 20th anniversary, the exhibition kicked off with a weekend of tours led by HDTS director Vanesa Zendejas and guest curator Iwona Blazwick. The latter is director of the Whitechapel Gallery in London and has brought in six artists from the East Coast and abroad, to add to the three regional artists in the mix. Although the event retains a certain do-it-yourself aesthetic, the presentation and works are neater and better mapped than before.

Gerald Clarke, memory of the earth2022 Courtesy of the artist and High Desert Test Sites, photo by Sarah Lyon

“Context is everything,” says artist Andrea Zittel, one of the event’s main founders, as she drives her sport utility vehicle down a dusty road. “I like to marry all works of art with the right situations.” Zendejas echoes this sentiment. “We really try to situate the work in a way that the tangential experiences along the way are part of the whole,” she says. “And that’s kind of the magic of the desert.”

Zittel moved to Joshua Tree 22 years ago, buying five acres that eventually became a work complex called AZ West. Her eco-friendly, low-key lifestyle became her art, celebrated in a landmark exhibit at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles in 2007, which featured handmade clothing and self-contained living modules.

Jack Pierson, The end of the world2022 Courtesy of the artist and High Desert Test Sites, photo by Sarah Lyon

HDTS began shortly after Zittel’s move to the desert, working with Lisa Anne Auerbach, Shaun Caley Regen, Andy Stillpass and John Connelly. They chose the name, High Desert Test Sites, in reference to nuclear test sites in neighboring Nevada. “I liked this name because it is mysterious and compelling but slightly sinister at the same time,” Zittel wrote in a art forum article in 2005. Some of the grim associations show up in the current edition, such as the all caps signage that reads “The End of the World”, looming and surrounded by desert brush in Twentynine Palms. Jack Pierson’s work is made of composite panels painted silver. It’s reminiscent of the glamorous Hollywood sign in Los Angeles, three hours away, but packs a heavy dose of dark humor. The freestanding letters are behind the Palms Restaurant, a popular roadhouse that was blocked on opening weekend.

Across the road is Paloma Varga Weisz Foreign body (2022), a sculpture of a gigantic woman with a placid face and a giant log piercing her torso. The character sits atop a small food stand selling vegetarian hot dogs, a nod to American roadside food stops with programmatic features. “For me, it’s a very simple sign of nature passing through a human being,” Weisz explains, avoiding giving a definitive interpretation of the work. “It is important that it is absolutely unclear what is going on.”

Still by Dana Sherwood, Other dessert landscapes2022 Courtesy of the artist

The two videos of Researchers, presented individually in two venues, use local resources, as participating artists are encouraged to do. Erkan Özgen worked with retired Marines to make Hare (2022), a short film in which veterans slap each other, ready guns and throw bullets at a propulsive pace. It’s a reminder that a major Marine Corps training base sits just above the mountain range, occasional bangs lighting up the sky. Dana Sherwood worked with a local animal shelter to provide horses for her play Other dessert landscapes (2022), in which the animals indulge in tables set with what look like lavish desserts – horse-friendly food suspended in gelatin. Shot in infrared, it is strange and dreamlike.

The memories of the earth are summoned in several works, including hut i and Hut II (2014) by Rachel Whiteread, perhaps the most internationally known artist. These gray huts are located down a dirt road on private land and consist of two large-scale cement casts of the family homes that still dot the area. Cement was poured from the inside and then the walls removed, so only impressions of the buildings upside down remain. This is the first time the landowner, who commissioned the work several years ago, has allowed the public to visit.

Alice Chaner, rock pool2022 Courtesy of the artist and High Desert Test Sides, photo by Sarah Lyon

Also referring to the place is Gerald Clarke’s memory of the earth (2022), with its hundreds of pennants flying on poles at Sunfair Dry Lake, each imprinted with the image of a fish. Clarke, a member of the Cahuilla Indians, once lived in the area. Off Ironage Road in Wonder Valley, Alice Channer designed rock pool (2022), a 60-foot-long red container at ground level in the shape of an oil spill. It is filled with rock salt from a nearby salt mine. The other works in this edition of HDTS are by Kate Lee Short Respite (2022), a building designed with pipes around the roofline to capture wind noise, and Dineo Seshee Bopape Lerato the golo (2022), made up of approximately 5,000 bricks handcrafted by local volunteers.

Blazwick has been visiting the area for two decades and was introduced to Zittel by a mutual friend. “I realized what she was building here was this utopian situation,” says the curator, “where she doesn’t differentiate between applied arts and fine arts, that it was all just a vision . Four years ago she was invited to curate the next HDTS, but the exhibition has been delayed so far by Covid-19.

Paloma Varga Weisz, Foreign body2022 Courtesy of the artist and High Desert Test Sites, photo by Sarah Lyon

Over the years, Zendejas says HDTS has attracted more and more visitors, although it’s impossible to track the numbers since visitors explore the exhibits on their own. Two clear signs of success are the overflowing motels and Airbnb-like accommodations on opening weekends and the other arts events that have sprung up nearby. These include the Joshua Treeniallaunched in 2015, and the better-funded and promoted Desert X, whose third edition in the Coachella Valley took place last year and which partnered with the Saudi government on Desert X AlUla, whose second edition was recently completed.

Recently, Zittel took a step back from AZ West, handing over the management of HDTS and this resort to a team. She moved into a modest house in Joshua Tree with, she says smiling, “a 300 square foot studio that doubled as a garage.” After years of running a workshop producing handcrafted textiles and ceramics, she is once again turning to her own work, although she has not yet understood what form this will take.

  • High Desert Test Sites: The Researchersthrough May 22, near Joshua Tree, California.
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