Fine Art Insurance – Bing Gallery http://binggallery.com/ Wed, 11 May 2022 20:32:45 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://binggallery.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/default-150x150.png Fine Art Insurance – Bing Gallery http://binggallery.com/ 32 32 McAlester grad leads Oklahoma Arts Institute | Local News https://binggallery.com/mcalester-grad-leads-oklahoma-arts-institute-local-news/ Wed, 11 May 2022 20:32:45 +0000 https://binggallery.com/mcalester-grad-leads-oklahoma-arts-institute-local-news/ Robert Ward brings his passion for music and the fine arts to a new role as head of the Oklahoma Arts Institute. The 1998 McAlester High School graduate was named the nonprofit’s fifth arts program director after spending nearly two decades there in one capacity – and said he hoped to serve students who faced […]]]>

Robert Ward brings his passion for music and the fine arts to a new role as head of the Oklahoma Arts Institute.

The 1998 McAlester High School graduate was named the nonprofit’s fifth arts program director after spending nearly two decades there in one capacity – and said he hoped to serve students who faced a musical journey similar to his.

“I want to see support and see students coming from southeast Oklahoma and McAlester so we can continue the experience that I had,” Ward said.

Ward said he moved to McAlester as a sophomore, spending his formative years there and now calls it his home.

He played baseball and football at McAlester, but always had an interest in the fine arts. Ward said his father pushed him to continue auditioning for the choir program and he became a member of the All States Choir for three years.

Ward also studied at the Arts Institute for three years before working there for 15 summers as a counselor, counselor coordinator, technical director and faculty member, directing the choir in 2019.

“I have a lot of experience and a lot of love for the program,” Ward said.

Ward said he enjoys being around people who are passionate about the music on the program.

He said working with people in the creative process of making music felt like magic to him, and his experience with the Institute of the Arts motivated him to continue in music.

“It really helped me to see that there are other people who are chasing it and are passionate about it,” he added. “It was really important to see that there were other kids from other towns in Oklahoma who were like me, who maybe had multiple interests but who could really excel in the arts.”

Ward graduated from Oklahoma State University and served as a choir director for a decade before continuing his education.

He went on to earn a master’s degree from Southern Methodist University and a doctorate from the University of North Texas.

Ward’s educational career took him to Emporia State University in Kansas before taking a brief hiatus from music sales insurance amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

Now head of the Arts Institute, Ward said he wants to help students and teachers in the arts in any way he can – similar to the support he has seen McAlester from the Bass family.

“You just felt that support in the community,” Ward said.

The Oklahoma Arts Institute at Quartz Mountain began in 1977 and is a private, nonprofit organization whose mission is to provide exceptional multidisciplinary arts experiences that develop individual talent and inspire lifelong passion for the arts.

The OAI Elementary Program is an intensive two-week summer course for high school students who win a scholarship of nearly $3,000. Primary funding comes from private donors, with matching funds from the Oklahoma State Department of Education and additional support from the Oklahoma Arts Council.

Students audition statewide in January and February for one of the following disciplines: choral music, orchestra, drawing and painting, photography, filmmaking, acting, dance, and creative writing.

Ward said the program accepts 250 students and brings in faculty from across the country to teach. He said the instructors come from top art schools in the country and this year included 2021 Grammy Music Educator Award recipient Jeffrey Murdock, a music professor at the University of Arkansas.

“We go out and try to find the best of the best to teach these students,” Ward said.

The Oklahoma Fall Arts Institute is a series of four-day weekend workshops for educators and adult artists of all levels in the literary, visual, and performing arts. The program reaches more than 50,000 Oklahoma public school children each year.

Ward said the program offers multiple disciplines each weekend and strives to give back to teachers.

He said OSAI is working on a virtual program that grew out of a COVID-19 pilot program and aims to better reach rural areas to help students have better access to education and help them audition.

Ward said

“We can’t be everywhere at once, but if we can offer some kind of program to reach and support those programs, then we want to do everything we can,” Ward said.

Contact Adrian O’Hanlon III at aohanlon@mcalesternews.com

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The art of Mickey La Fave is all about the color https://binggallery.com/the-art-of-mickey-la-fave-is-all-about-the-color/ Mon, 09 May 2022 16:44:12 +0000 https://binggallery.com/the-art-of-mickey-la-fave-is-all-about-the-color/ “What attracts me are the super bright colors – what the eye doesn’t actually see,” says artist Mickey La Fave. “Color is all my thing. I couldn’t use a brown to save my life. La Fave’s paintings use bright colors to accentuate his subjects. She uses hydrus watercolors which come in a glass bottle as […]]]>

“What attracts me are the super bright colors – what the eye doesn’t actually see,” says artist Mickey La Fave. “Color is all my thing. I couldn’t use a brown to save my life.

La Fave’s paintings use bright colors to accentuate his subjects. She uses hydrus watercolors which come in a glass bottle as they are more saturated in color and more vibrant.

Her specialty is watercolor animal portraits.

“Painting pets and other animals is the most passionate thing for me. I love animals because I connect with them. I can tell when they are happy, angry or curious.

In addition to her watercolors, La Fave creates jewelry and multimedia pieces in her home studio Arvada. She says her style is pervasive but generally fantastical and mystical.

“I can’t stick to one style, despite the advice to stick to one thing. The only consistent thing about my style is that nothing is realistic.

La Fave grew up in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, in Escanaba, near Lake Superior and Canada.

“It’s rural, beautiful and depressed.”

She started making art when she was 5 years old and at 6 she won a first ribbon at the county fair with her portrayal of Paul Bunyan. In high school, she was inspired and trained by local artist John Gustafson. After studying art at Central Michigan University, La Fave left Michigan because there was no work.

“There were no jobs there, except at the stationery.”

She moved to Houston and worked as an insurance adjuster, then as an investigator in the arson and fraud claims unit. She was transferred to Colorado in 1982.

“I haven’t painted for a long time,” she says. “It gnawed at me never to be an artist, which I always wanted.

“What made me paint again was a trip to Santa Fe with friends in 2011. We decided to create original gifts to exchange for Christmas. The idea appealed to me because I needed of a purpose to paint.

“BRILLIANT MOOSE”, WATERCOLOR, 14.5 by 21.5 inches. “A colored glaze technique that I developed for painting animals,” La Fave said. “I’ve done several moose paintings and love how each one comes out so differently.” PHOTO COURTESY OF MICKEY LA FAVE
NECKLACE AND EARRINGS IN RHODOCHROSITE set with golden accents. The necklace is hand-tied with semi-precious rhodochrosite stones. PHOTO COURTESY OF MICKEY LA FAVE

Once she started, she went all out.

“I’ve done tent shows all over the place. I took lessons with watercolourist Janet Nunn in the evenings. Everything I do I learned from Nunn, including using hydrus watercolor paints. She was influential because she’s not about realism, just color.

La Fave moved to Arvada in 2016. She lives with her two cats, her dog Harley, a sheltie and a little parrot named Kanani. She retired in 2018 to become a full-time artist.

She said she relied on six spirit guides to help her with her art.

“I have a team of artist spirit guides working through me, including a great great aunt named Caitlin, an artist who lived in Canada. I had recurring dreams about her three story house until I realized who she was. She is always there to help me.

Another of her spirit guides is Gustafson, her high school teacher, watercolourist and potter.

“I saw him in Michigan in the late 2000s and he asked me, ‘Do you paint?’ I felt bad saying ‘No’ to him because he inspired me so much. After I started painting again, I went back to tell him, but he was dead. I was disappointed because I wanted him to know me and be proud of me. Now he is coaching me from beyond. Now he knows. Every time I paint, I invite my guides and they help me. I imagine them and thank them for their advice.

In addition to his animal subjects, La Fave paints nature scenes, old vehicles and buildings, and some abstracts.

“I love painting old rusty vehicles because I see so many different colors like turquoise, magenta and yellow. I mix them together so they pop, and it makes for a cool painting. I also love old buildings I do a dark background, then a band of colors above the building, there is often a flying witch.

La Fave uses watercolor glazes to paint its colorful skies. With glazing, the colors are applied in thin transparent coats, one at a time, allowing each to dry before adding another coat. Last summer, she gave glazing demonstrations at Art on the Farm, a monthly community event in Neighborhood Gazette Editor Guy Nahmiach’s Wheat Ridge Farm. (Art on the Farm returns this year – for more information or to participate, email WheatRidgeCreates@ci.wheatridge.co.us.)

Her community involvement also includes her work as President of the Arvada Fine Art Guild and as Director of the Arvada Art Studio Tour.

La Fave is often inspired by photos or other images.

“Images can speak to me, whether they are mine or those of my friends. If something makes me smile, laugh or feel an expression, I want to know the story behind it.

One inspiration was a photo she took in Europe of a bent over woman carrying a load, with many cats following her.

“I painted her because I wanted to know, what is her story – her fight? Why were the cats following her? Did she come from the fish market? I don’t know why, but she filled my heart.

La Fave diversified into jewelry and multimedia because it needed a break from painting. She said her other media was color-focused as well.

“With jewelry, I start with a semi-precious stone as the centerpiece and find colors to complement the stone, to make it stand out.”

For more information see mickeylafave.com or email him at mickeysfineart@gmail.com.

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Art Center celebrates 35 years – Estes Park Trail-Gazette https://binggallery.com/art-center-celebrates-35-years-estes-park-trail-gazette/ Sat, 07 May 2022 17:02:36 +0000 https://binggallery.com/art-center-celebrates-35-years-estes-park-trail-gazette/ In May 1987, the Art Center of Estes Park opened its doors, displaying the artwork of the 21 local artists who worked together to plan and build the center. Then on June 12, 1987, they had their grand opening! This included a selective group of artist work in stained glass as well as three featured […]]]>

In May 1987, the Art Center of Estes Park opened its doors, displaying the artwork of the 21 local artists who worked together to plan and build the center. Then on June 12, 1987, they had their grand opening! This included a selective group of artist work in stained glass as well as three featured artists, a weaver, a handmade paper painter, and a wood carver.

The Trail-Gazette wrote, “Patrons were challenged and refreshed by the diversity of artistic expression exhibited in the varied media and by the artists present who spoke of their calling to the fine or applied arts and their interest in Art Center.” The paper went on to describe the Art Center as “both a showplace and a workplace “because of the strong education vision.

Since 1987, hundreds of artists have exhibited their art in the Art Center and helped the Art Center grow; teaching classes, being on the Board, hanging shows, running fundraisers, building display-cases, greeting art lovers, and making sales. Newhopes, new passions and dreams were born, year after year!

Our featured artist this month is photographer, John Shelton and in recognition of Art Center’s 35 years, we will be highlighting two of the artists from the 1987 opening, Chris Switzer, and Karen Dick.

Chris was one of the driving forces to get Art Center started and opened. She took the courageous steps of being the person to sign the lease, get insurance, opened bank accounts, and do the paperwork for the 501c3 as well as a volunteer director. Chris has remained an artist member for 35 years. Karen Dick was a founding artist and serviced on the first Board. Karen just recently closed her studio but is still an Art Center member!

To help support the Art Center for the next 35 years. Go to the Art Center website, https://www.artcenterofestes.com (click on 35 Anniversary) to donate to the “$35 for 35 years” campaign.

Apart from Chris Switzer’s journey

I came to Estes in 1967 with my husband, Phil and our two sons, Dave, and Joe. Joe and his family have continued to live in Estes. Joe’s two sons, Jeff and Ben were born in Estes. Dave lived in Shanghai, China for 11 years. He taught English at the University level. He and his wife, now, live and work near San Francisco, CA. Phil and I raised alpacas in Estes for 40 years.

Since 1971, when I learned to weave, I have been trying different techniques and have had many teachers. Working with bamboo sticks added dimensionality to patterns. Waffle weave became something altogether different. In 1978, I returned to college at Colorado State University and commuted 3 days a week for 6 years, receiving a BFA in 1984 in weaving with a double major in anthropology/archaeology.

At that time, I wondered what would come next. My final project, “Pathways” gave me a sense of hope for the future. Soon, with the help of 20 other local artists, the Art Center of Estes Park came to be. In May 1987, it opened!

Karen Dick found her way to Estes

I was born in Louisville, KY, grew up in Indiana, and graduated with a degree in Speech and Hearing Therapy from Purdue University. Immediately I came to the beautiful state of Colorado to attend grad school at CSU. Moving to Colorado was the best decision I ever made. After completion of my master’s degree, I was employed as a speech therapist in the Denver Public Schools. It was during this time that I decided to take a nighttime pottery class. Little did I know how long it would take to learn to center the clay and throw respectable forms. But I got hooked. I loved working with the clay and began taking classes in the summers at Castle Clay Pottery Studio and then studied ceramics for several semesters with the late Jim and Nan McKinnell at Loretto Heights College in Denver. To improve my skills, I took workshops at Anderson Ranch in Aspen and at Arrowmont School in Gatlinburg, TN. I became a member of the Castle Clay Co-op in Denver and later the Brimstone Potters in Boulder.

My husband Nate and I moved to Estes Park in the fall of 1983. I was now devoting all my time to making pottery, doing outdoor art fairs in the summer, and selling my pots on consignment. My home studio had an electric kiln, but I needed a facility for doing gas reduction firings. I joined the Boulder Potters’ Guild in 1986 and was a member there for 35 years. I just resigned this past summer and closed my studio.

I was one of the original exhibiting members of the Art Center which was a wonderful association. Through my work in clay, I have made some lifetime friends and I have gained a deep appreciation of the crafts of pottery and weaving. Working with clay, I could see what I had accomplished at the end of the day. I enjoyed experimenting with glazes and forms in functional work. It has always made me happy that people bought my work to use in their own homes or to give as gifts.

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A reason to show up https://binggallery.com/a-reason-to-show-up/ Thu, 05 May 2022 03:08:13 +0000 https://binggallery.com/a-reason-to-show-up/ Premium commentary and analysis A reason to show up If you really want to grow your business over the next decade, you’ll have to solve the problem of recruiting talent in a brutally competitive talent market. The solution, you’ll probably find, lies not so much in marketing as in some form of branding. We need […]]]>

Premium commentary and analysis

A reason to show up

If you really want to grow your business over the next decade, you’ll have to solve the problem of recruiting talent in a brutally competitive talent market. The solution, you’ll probably find, lies not so much in marketing as in some form of branding. We need to answer the question that comes to the mind of potential employees: “Why should I choose your company to work for rather than Amazon, Google or an e-commerce company?” (And remember, our problem isn’t that we’re printers. People are looking for something we can deliver as well as anyone. They’re looking for purpose, relevance and a place to feel good. to belong.)

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About Wayne Lynn

Wayne Lynn is a believer in the adage that “you can’t manage what you can’t measure”. Combining his considerable strengths in leadership, economics and strategy with extensive experience in public and private companies, he brings focus and discipline to the task of creating and sustaining success in today’s chaotic environment.

Wayne has managed businesses ranging in size from $5 million to $500 million in annual sales. He has guided these organizations through a number of diverse market sectors, including magazines, catalogs, inserts, direct mail and general commercial printing.

A student and practitioner of the art of business, Wayne’s latest goal is to help business leaders make their businesses more economically viable, more relevant in the marketplace, more adaptable to constant change, and more sustainable in the future. long term. It’s about people, what they know, and how they execute what they know.

Wayne can be reached at 704-516-7787 or [email protected].

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JPMorgan Chase & Co. raises Hiscox (OTCMKTS:HCXLF) price target to GBX 870 https://binggallery.com/jpmorgan-chase-co-raises-hiscox-otcmktshcxlf-price-target-to-gbx-870/ Thu, 28 Apr 2022 09:33:56 +0000 https://binggallery.com/jpmorgan-chase-co-raises-hiscox-otcmktshcxlf-price-target-to-gbx-870/ Hiscox (OTCMKTS: HCXLF – Get a rating) saw its price target increased by JPMorgan Chase & Co. from GBX 850 ($10.83) to GBX 870 ($11.09) in a research report released Wednesday, Fly reports. Other research analysts have also published research reports on the stock. HSBC downgraded Hiscox shares from a buy rating to a hold […]]]>

Hiscox (OTCMKTS: HCXLFGet a rating) saw its price target increased by JPMorgan Chase & Co. from GBX 850 ($10.83) to GBX 870 ($11.09) in a research report released Wednesday, Fly reports.

Other research analysts have also published research reports on the stock. HSBC downgraded Hiscox shares from a buy rating to a hold rating in a Monday, Jan. 17 research note. Morgan Stanley reissued a buy rating and issued a price target of 1,159 GBX ($14.77) (previously 1,177 GBX ($15.00)) on Hiscox shares in a research note Tuesday, April 5. Investec downgraded Hiscox shares from a hold rating to a buy rating in a research rating on Monday. Royal Bank of Canada reissued a hold note and posted a $1,000.00 price target on Hiscox shares in a research note on Friday, April 1. Finally, Barclays raised its price target on Hiscox shares from 1,027 GBX ($13.09) to 1,067 GBX ($13.60) in a Wednesday, April 20 research note. Six analysts gave the stock a hold rating and five gave the company a buy rating. Based on data from MarketBeat.com, the company currently has an average rating of Hold and an average price target of $821.61.

Shares of HCXLF Stock opened at $12.70 on Wednesday. The company has a 50-day moving average of $12.48 and a two-hundred-day moving average of $11.81. Hiscox has a 1-year low of $10.80 and a 1-year high of $13.23.

Hiscox Company Profile (Get a rating)

Hiscox Ltd, through its subsidiaries, provides insurance and reinsurance services in the UK, Europe, USA and internationally. The Company operates through four segments: Hiscox Retail, Hiscox London Market, Hiscox Re & ILS and Corporate Centre. It provides commercial insurance to small and medium sized businesses, personal lines coverage including high value household, fine art, luxury automobiles and classic cars through brokers, partners and consumers direct using traditional and digital business models.

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Hi-Fi Drowning’s Eric Martin returns to a Dallas stage https://binggallery.com/hi-fi-drownings-eric-martin-returns-to-a-dallas-stage/ Tue, 26 Apr 2022 09:10:02 +0000 https://binggallery.com/hi-fi-drownings-eric-martin-returns-to-a-dallas-stage/ It’s been almost a decade since musician Eric Martin last performed on a Dallas stage. On April 30, after playing in three bands, several solo projects and a stint in New York, the Dallas-based singer and songwriter returns to play a special set with an array of well-known Dallas musicians at Sundown at Granada. A […]]]>

It’s been almost a decade since musician Eric Martin last performed on a Dallas stage. On April 30, after playing in three bands, several solo projects and a stint in New York, the Dallas-based singer and songwriter returns to play a special set with an array of well-known Dallas musicians at Sundown at Granada. A career musician, music teacher and music production manager, Martin has fronted several influential bands, such as Memory Shivers, Heart Eyes Open and the ever-popular Hi-Fi Drowning.

Hi-Fi Drowning consisted of brothers Jon and Jeremy Eggert, Carlos Jackson and Martin. Early on, the band developed a reputation as the loudest, loudest and most experimental project in Dallas. Hi-Fi Drowning has been revered by musicians and critics. MTV.com previously ran an article hailing them as America’s answer to Blur, helping propel Dallas’ distinctive brand of space rock onto the national stage.

Flickerstick, Chomsky, Secret Machines and Hi-Fi Drowning were getting major label attention and ready for the national stage. Hi-Fi’s opportunity came in the form of a development deal with MCA Records. In 1999, after signing, the band flew to Chicago for six weeks to work with producer Keith Cleversly (Spiritualized, The Flaming Lips) and record their first offering, Narci Darvish.

After successfully releasing the album, the band amicably parted ways with original drummer Carlos Jackson and enlisted powerhouse musician Taylor Young from The O’s. This line-up with Young on drums dramatically elevated the band’s musicality as the band entered the studio to record their follow-up, Around the Rosareleasing the album in 2002.

Twenty years later, Around the Rosa remains one of Dallas’ most influential and spectacular albums of the past two decades. A village of prominent and influential musicians, including brothers Todd and Toby Pipes of Deep Blue Something, Austin-based producer Chris “Frenchie” Smith of The Bubble, Taylor Tatch and even Stuart Sikes of White Stripes, helped shape the 10 songs. opus who is Around the Rosa. The album is a journey in sound texture, positions and melody. An elusive album, it was a true testament to the work ethic of local musicians at their best.

Where there’s a community of artists who genuinely care about each other, there’s a big, thriving scene. — Eric Martin

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“The community has always created and helped everyone involved. Where there’s a community of artists who genuinely care about each other, there’s a big, thriving scene,” says Martin.

While Todd and Toby Pipes are credited with producing the album at the famed BPL studios they once owned, it was Chris “Frenchie” Smith who brought his signature sonic chaos to Hi-Fi Drowning.

“It really is a great record, and if only me and Hi-Fi had done it together, we would have focused more on noise and mayhem. Todd and Toby had a real pulse on balance,” Smith says . “They chaperone the group and anchor the album in a more timeless work”

The album took well over two years to write, record and mix with many versions swapped between the band, the producers and a man known as “The Count” in San Francisco doing the final mixing. It was recorded on 2 inch tape, adding to that warm aura that prevails throughout, which the Pipes Brothers were known for.

Around the Rosa wasn’t going to be done without the belief of Todd and Toby Pipes in the band,” Martin says. were blown away to see them there. It was later that we started working with them, but that’s really how the relationship with Deep Blue Something and us started.

Before the recording process began, Martin and the Eggert brothers moved into a house together, playfully named “The Ponderosa” after a trailer park adjacent to a 1970s roller rink. The Ponderosa which the band wrote and rehearsed day and night for release.

“The origins of this sound are that the band rubs shoulders with each other all the time,” Smith explains. “There was a constant adaptation in the way they played together.”

Martin drew on stream-of-consciousness writings and puns when working on the lyrics.

“A lot of songs about Pink were written in the backyard of The Ponderosa with candles, clippings and my little tape recorder,” says Martin. “I’ve always been drawn to more abstract music and art. Sometimes too much realism in a song locks in a person’s imagination.

Shortly after Around the Rosa came out, the band broke up as Jon and Jeremy Eggert moved to the West Coast, Taylor Young finished college and started the O’s hit with John Pedigo, and Martin branched out into other musical projects and briefly in New York.

“It was a moment in time, four guys coming together and making amazing music,” Toby Pipes said. “We were all so excited to do what we were doing and I think it shows on the record.”

While obsession with ’90s music culture floats free these days — like Blur frontman Damon Albarn’s special appearance on Billie Eilish’s Coachella set — it’s hard to forget the decade of music from Dallas that sent major label reps into a feeding frenzy. While most bands have quit and traded guitars for insurance plans and 401(k), there remains serious interest in what happened here decades ago. The Flickerstick reunion show, slated for June at The House of Blues, sold out in just days. The DFW Legacy Series continues to release and sell vinyl albums from this period. The demand for this music has never been greater, and 20 years after the fact, Hi-Fi Drowning’s Around the Rosa has recently been added to Apple Music and all other streaming platforms for the occasion. As a music teacher, Martin is amazed at what his students want to learn on the guitar.

“Everything in art, fashion and music is cyclical. I teach guitar and voice and have been blown away when students in their late teens… want to learn the Sonic Youth albums, My Bloody Valentine and Slow Dive. With music, you can now experience it all on YouTube,” says Martin.

After years underground, Martin is ready for his next chapter. For him, getting back into the arena and performing shows again is an exercise in patience, gratitude and redemption.

“I was in a state of personal renewal. For the first time, I feel like I have enough control on stage, personally, spiritually and emotionally to do this,” Martin says.

Eric Martin with Chris Norwood performs at 10 p.m. Saturday, April 30 at Granada Sunset, 3520 Greenville Ave. Tickets for the 21 and over show are $10.

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Climate change has made art insurance more expensive https://binggallery.com/climate-change-has-made-art-insurance-more-expensive/ Fri, 22 Apr 2022 13:25:54 +0000 https://binggallery.com/climate-change-has-made-art-insurance-more-expensive/ Art collectors in California, Florida and other states facing weather-related disasters exacerbated by climate change are finding that insuring artwork is becoming more expensive, with policies of increasingly difficult to obtain (or renew) and containing new restrictions. Earthquake-prone California, which has faced a series of massive wildfires (often followed by landslides) in recent years, is […]]]>

Art collectors in California, Florida and other states facing weather-related disasters exacerbated by climate change are finding that insuring artwork is becoming more expensive, with policies of increasingly difficult to obtain (or renew) and containing new restrictions.

Earthquake-prone California, which has faced a series of massive wildfires (often followed by landslides) in recent years, is one of the epicenters of this struggle to find insurance coverage for houses and the art in them, with the annual cost of home insurance policies increasing as much as 40% and art insurance premiums increasing between 5% and 12%, according to Amee Yunn, assistant vice president of New York-based Berkley Asset Protection, an insurance company specializing in fine art, jewelry and other fine art. -value, personal and business assets. Florida, with its increasingly intense hurricanes and flooding, is also a concern for the insurance industry.

“A lot of rich people have flocked to Florida because of the pandemic,” Yunn says, “and they took their art with them.” This concentration of heritage assets in areas prone to flooding and hurricane damage creates significant risks to the financial well-being of insurance companies. “We’re seeing a lot more billion-dollar claims today than just 10 years ago,” Yunn says, forcing companies like his to write fewer new policies, raise prices and add deductibles and exclusions. “The problem is acute.”

Collectors in hazardous areas

Mary Pontillo, national fine art practice leader at Risk Strategies, a Boston-based insurance brokerage, says California collectors have faced the greatest difficulty obtaining new or renewed coverage because many insurers “will not take any more risks”, “raise prices considerably” or do not renew coverage for customers at all. She adds that “if all the national insurance companies decline a risk, I can usually find someone at Lloyd’s of London who will look into the cover, but the terms, prices and requirements may not be something a customer wishes to take into account”.

According to Claire Marmion, managing director and founder of Haven Art Group, an art management company owned by Pure Insurance, the problem facing art insurers is that “the concentration of valuable collections corresponds to the places most prone to catastrophic events”. ”, such as Florida, California (especially Los Angeles) and the tri-state area of ​​Connecticut, New Jersey and New York. “Risk management” has become the slogan of the art insurance industry.

Wildfires greatly increase risk, Marmion notes, because homeowners may not have the same notice as hurricanes, floods and even earthquakes, where there may be 72 hours’ notice. “Wildfires start instantly at the end of the street, or there may be an ember brought in by a 100-mile-per-hour wind,” she says. Also, in some of the wooded areas where forest fires have occurred, there may be only one road in and out, making it more difficult for homeowners to evacuate, let alone their art collections.

New policies for new realities

In an effort to lower premiums or buy policies, some fine art coverage excludes events such as earthquakes, fires and floods, says William Fleischer, president of New York Insurance Company Bernard Fleischer & Sounds. “You see a lot more negotiation” with customers, he says, based on what they are or aren’t willing to pay. “When you’re in insurance, you’re in the game,” he says, noting that customers living in areas with recurring losses and claims from natural disasters, who want comprehensive insurance protection for their collections art, pay up to 25% premium increases upon renewal.

The Covid-19 pandemic has added to rising costs due to global inflation, growing demand and high prices for timber and labor to rebuild damaged or destroyed homes that housed collections of art, according to Judy Robeson, senior vice president of the Pure Group of Insurance Companies.

Traditionally, insurance policies for fine art had no deductible, but many insurance companies now require them for collectors living in specific states or regions where natural disasters related to climate change have become regular events. “Companies charge deductibles based on the amount of potential loss,” with deductibles for forest fires and earthquakes amounting to “5% or 10% of the total collection value,” says Steven Pincus , Senior Managing Director of Risk Strategies. “That might not seem like a lot, but if you have a $50 million collection, the franchise could be
$5 million.

Flooded roads in North Miami Beach in October 2020. Florida is the US state most affected by climate change, where water levels are constantly rising


Photo: IBL/Shuytterstock

Pincus adds that some insurance companies are placing additional restrictions on public transit coverage, which tends to be the largest area of ​​damage claims, to reduce their overall exposure. Increasingly, however, he says “companies aren’t writing new business and renewing in states prone to catastrophic losses, California being the biggest.” Among those companies, he notes, are AIG, Chubb, Cincinnati and Vault. “They want to eliminate exposure from their books, and the only way to stop the bleeding is to stop writing politics.”

Typical exclusions in fine art insurance policies relate to war, civil unrest, nuclear accidents, problems resulting from the restoration of a work of art, and “inherent defects” of an object ( aspects of the materials of a particular work that would cause it to naturally decay or become unstable). However, the challenges posed by climate change have been added to the list.

disaster preparedness

Nowadays, insurance companies follow the evolution of climate change as much as environmental scientists. “We have a corporate disaster team that tracks the company’s total exposure to disasters,” Yunn explains. The risks of tornadoes in the Great Plains, hurricanes along the East Coast and earthquakes on the West Coast are well known, but the increasing intensity of hurricanes and tornadoes, as well as their increasing number, are alarming signals. The tornado that ripped through Kentucky and several other states last year on a 200-mile path in the unlikely month of December was another sign of weather becoming less predictable, as have a series of hurricanes, d wildfires and freezing temperatures that have plagued Texas since 2017. In February 2021, a combination of snow, sleet and freezing rain crippled the Texas power grid for weeks, killing more than 200 people and nearly $200 billion in damage.

“There seems to be nowhere safe from the effects of climate change,” says Pincus, which is impacting the world of fine art insurance, leading to higher prices and a coverage less available.

The insurance industry is placing increasing emphasis on risk mitigation, forcing property owners in general and art collectors in particular who live in places where natural disasters are a recurring event to take measures that limit the likelihood of damage. These include creating contingency plans, which identify the worst problems that can arise and what needs to be done to fix them. Among the key elements of such a plan is having it written down and accessible at home, “so people can reach it to understand what they’re supposed to do now and later,” Marmion says.

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Meet the Candidates: Argyle ISD Board of Trustees Place 6 – Cross Timbers Gazette | Denton County South | mound of flowers https://binggallery.com/meet-the-candidates-argyle-isd-board-of-trustees-place-6-cross-timbers-gazette-denton-county-south-mound-of-flowers/ Tue, 19 Apr 2022 19:10:52 +0000 https://binggallery.com/meet-the-candidates-argyle-isd-board-of-trustees-place-6-cross-timbers-gazette-denton-county-south-mound-of-flowers/ Residents of southern Denton County will head to the polls beginning later this month to decide a plethora of municipal and school contests. The Gazette of the Crusader Woods asked each candidate in a contested local race to answer a brief questionnaire to help voters make an informed decision at the polls this spring. At […]]]>

Residents of southern Denton County will head to the polls beginning later this month to decide a plethora of municipal and school contests.

The Gazette of the Crusader Woods asked each candidate in a contested local race to answer a brief questionnaire to help voters make an informed decision at the polls this spring.

At Argyle ISD, three-year terms for places 6 and 7 on the board will be on the ballot. Andrew Hering and Matthew Slaton are running for 6th place, and 7th place initially attracted three candidates – Natalie Long, Nicholas Reynolds and Joshua Westrom – but Long withdrew from the race. However, his name will still appear on the ballot, as his withdrawal came after the deadline.

Argyle ISD also called for a $268 bond election to fund several new schools and more as the district plans more growth. The link will appear as four proposals on the ballot.

Election day is Saturday, May 7, with early voting from April 25 to May 3. Click here for more information on voting in Denton County.

Argyle ISD Board of Directors Place 6

André Hering

André Hering, 31 years old

City/place of residence: Argyle

How long have you lived in Argyle ISD: 4 years

Occupation: Insurance and mortgage broker

Education: I have a bachelor’s degree in kinesiology and a master’s degree in educational administration.

Prior Service on Government/Community/Civic Boards: Nothing

What motivated you to apply for this position and why are you the best choice: Argyle ISD is in a very exciting time! We are a popular destination neighborhood for teachers and students. However, the landscape of Argyle is changing rapidly with the development of Harvest, Canyon Falls and The Ridge. The plans we adopt to address this growth will have a lasting impact on students and families for decades to come. With my wife Caroline and I having two young boys (Colton and Landon) in kindergarten and preschool, we are like many other families who will be here to experience these impacts. A candidate who is dedicated to serving children while also having a background in education and business would be a perfect fit for the needs of AISD today. I have a Masters in Educational Administration, taught and coached for 5 years and founded 2 successful businesses here locally. I am thrilled to serve this community that we all love and call home! Go Eagles!

Mission statement: It is critical for our district to have a bond package approved to reduce overcrowding in our elementary schools. We also need to complete a comprehensive growth study and plan for our middle and high schools. Finally, I will advocate for smart commercial development that benefits residents and helps to share the tax burden of AISDs.

Facebook page: Andrew Hering for Argyle ISD Place 6

Matthew Slaton

Matthew Slaton, 45 years old

City/place of residence: Argyle

How long have you lived in Argyle ISD: 14 years old

Occupation: CEO/Private Wealth Advisor at Slaton Capital Advisors Ltd. in Bartonville, TX

Education: Bachelor of Business Administration (Entrepreneurship and Strategic Management) from the University of North Texas (2000); Graduated from North West High School (1995).

Prior Service on Government/Community/Civic Boards: Coach and volunteer for Argyle Youth Sports Association and Denton Parks and Recreation (22 teams, 6 sports, 10 years). Volunteer for the Argyle Eagles Booster Club. Member and volunteer of PTA and PTO supporting school staff and campuses. Hilltop Elementary School and Argyle Middle School Campus Watch DOGS Program.

What motivated you to apply for this position and why are you the best choice: This is a unique time for Argyle ISD, and rapid growth is just one of the many challenges facing the district. I was motivated to apply for this position because I believe that my professional experience as a trustee advisor and local business owner, being a long-time resident and maintaining many friendships with families in all neighborhoods of the district would benefit Argyle ISD. To be clear, I’m not running for this position because of a single issue, nor do I have a specific schedule to geographic locations within the District. Tough decisions loom for the school district’s long-term initiatives, and I am prepared to make those decisions for the betterment of Argyle ISD. My goal, and my fiduciary responsibility, is to ensure that all students in this great school district receive the resources and opportunities necessary to succeed.

Mission statement: My mission is to work with all District stakeholders to establish, implement, and monitor long-term initiatives to provide every Argyle ISD student with the opportunities and resources necessary for continued excellence in their academic fields. , artistic, athletic and extracurricular. Activities.

Facebook page: Slaton and Westrom for the Argyle ISD School Board, places 6 and 7

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San Antonio Symphony season could end before end of 6-month strike https://binggallery.com/san-antonio-symphony-season-could-end-before-end-of-6-month-strike/ Fri, 15 Apr 2022 21:00:00 +0000 https://binggallery.com/san-antonio-symphony-season-could-end-before-end-of-6-month-strike/ More than six months into the strike by musicians at the San Antonio Symphony, the possibility of the orchestra’s 2021-22 season ending before the strike seems increasingly likely. The musicians have been on strike since Sept. 27 over a labor dispute with the Symphony Society of San Antonio, the nonprofit board that runs the orchestra. […]]]>

More than six months into the strike by musicians at the San Antonio Symphony, the possibility of the orchestra’s 2021-22 season ending before the strike seems increasingly likely.

The musicians have been on strike since Sept. 27 over a labor dispute with the Symphony Society of San Antonio, the nonprofit board that runs the orchestra. As negotiations continue, the musicians have planned their own three-concert series. And the San Antonio Opera, which normally contracts with the symphony orchestra for its productions, had to come up with a plan B because of the strike.

The symphony has not played since a free concert Sept. 18 in Main Plaza. No ticketed concerts for the 2021-22 season were played at the Tobin Center for the Performing Arts, where the symphony is one of the resident companies. So far, five performances have been postponed and 10 have been cancelled.

Three classical concerts and a Pops program remain in the season, which is scheduled to end on June 4.

The disputed contract runs until August 31. If no agreement is reached by then, the strike will continue pending contract negotiations.

“As is the case when a (collective agreement) is about to expire, a successor agreement must be reached,” said Richard Oppenheim, president of Local 23 of the American Federation of Musicians, the union trading on behalf of musicians. . “It is always preferable that this happens while the current CBA is in effect, but it is still the case even if the current agreement expires.”

It is still possible that at least some of the concerts planned for the season will take place, said Corey Cowart, executive director of the symphony.

“There are orchestras in other cities and other markets that have had a similar schedule of contract resolutions that have returned to concerts in late April or May for an abbreviated season,” Cowart said.

The musicians and council began working with federal mediators on February 14 and have met three times so far. Both parties are working to determine a date for a fourth session.

At the March 8 meeting, the board offered a contract that, if the musicians accepted, would resume performances for the current season and run through 2026. The base salary would be set at $30,650 for 30 weeks of work and would include increases. The average salary would be $35,400. The contract also includes health care and insurance benefits. But that would reduce the number of musicians from 72 to 50 through attrition.

The musicians were originally scheduled to receive a base salary of $35,774 for the 2021-22 season, before the contract was reopened due to the financial impact of the pandemic.

The musicians had already taken an 80% pay cut for the 2020-21 season, which was severely curtailed by the pandemic.

Following contentious negotiations last year, the Symphony Society imposed a contract on the musicians in September that reduced the full-time salary to $24,000 a year and the number of full-time musicians to 40. That’s when that the musicians went on strike.

The union has not made a formal counteroffer to the March 8 board proposal, Oppenheim said. The union is awaiting a response to a request for information sent to the Symphony Society on April 5 before a counter is filed.

Eliminating positions through attrition opens the door to the possibility of entire sections of instruments being lost, said violinist Mary Ellen Goree, chair of the symphony musicians’ bargaining committee.

“I don’t think it will work for artistic reasons and also because there’s nothing to say that they won’t come back to us in a year or two years and say, ‘We said a minimum of 50, and in fact , more than 60 of you stayed and we can’t afford it, so we have to reopen the contract,” she said. “Nothing says they can’t do this or won’t do this.”

Fourteen of the symphony orchestra’s 72 positions are currently open. Five musicians left in 2020, Cowart said, and the orchestra was unable to hold auditions to replace them because of the pandemic. Three retired in August 2021. And six have requested sabbaticals for the 2022-23 season. Their positions will be kept open so they can return in the 2023-24 season.

During the strike, the board canceled the musicians’ health insurance and other benefits, and both sides filed a complaint with the National Labor Relations Board, accusing each other of failing to bargain in good faith.

The complaint process is ongoing.

“Right now what’s going on is a bit of a procedural dispute,” Oppenheim said. “There were several aspects to the study. The question now is whether they want to consider them as a group unit or whether they want to disentangle them separately.

During this time, the musicians began to play together, but they did not do so as part of the San Antonio Symphony Orchestra. They performed in March for the first time since the strike began as part of First Baptist Church’s first fine arts series, performing as musicians of the San Antonio Symphony Orchestra. And they will launch a new series of three programs on Thursday.

” Let’s be clear. These are not symphonic concerts,” Goree said. “I’ve actually had people say to me, ‘Are you not back at work?’ I work, but I don’t work for the Symphony Society.

The musicians will perform on Thursday, April 22 under the direction of conductor Stefan Sanders, music director of the Central Texas Philharmonic and the Fayetteville Symphony Orchestra in North Carolina. The following concerts, May 12-13 and June 2-3, will be conducted by former symphonic music directors Sebastian Lang-Lessing and Christopher Wilkins.

The musicians will also give free family concerts on April 23 and June 4.

All concerts will take place at First Baptist.

The performances are meant to put money in musicians’ pockets and keep their fight in the public eye, said bassoonist Brian Petkovich, president of the Musicians of San Antonio Symphony Performance Fund, a new nonprofit founded by musicians to present shows and educational programs.

“Playing music for people is why we do it in the first place,” Petkovich said. “It’s really important that people know we’re here and remember what it’s about.”

The concert series is funded in part by a $100,000 grant from the San Antonio Symphony League, a nonprofit organization that provides volunteer and financial support to the symphony and the musicians. The musicians raise an additional $100,000 to cover expenses.

Education, including concerts for school-aged children, is a big part of the Symphony League’s mission. The organization had been in talks with the musicians about producing a youth concert last fall at the Tobin Center, but the arrival of the omicron variant crushed those plans, said league president Vickie Kinder. . They still wanted to find a way to implement this kind of programming, absent since the start of the pandemic in 2020.

“When Brian Petkovich approached us with this, and we had gone to the concert in March, we thought that was a way to do it,” Kinder said.

In addition to concerts at the First Baptist, some of the musicians have been contracted to perform as part of the orchestra for the San Antonio Opera’s production of “Rigoletto” on May 5 and 7. Normally the symphony would be contracted, but the opera had to go in another direction because of the strike.

The production calls for 52 musicians, a number that would have been used if the San Antonio Symphony Orchestra was playing, said E. Loren Meeker, the company’s general and artistic director.

“It’s going to allow us to do the complete opera as Verdi intended,” Meeker said. “For the first time in two years, we have a full orchestra, full sets and costumes, a full cast, a full choir, and we’re really, really excited to be back in grand opera.”

Meeker said she will continue to monitor the situation with the symphony so she can plan accordingly.

“We want a quick resolution,” she said. “For now, I’m so happy that we can create incredible works of art with incredible talent.”

dlmartin@express-news.net | Twitter: @DeborahMartinFR

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15 Surprising Things You Can Do In An Air Fryer https://binggallery.com/15-surprising-things-you-can-do-in-an-air-fryer/ Thu, 14 Apr 2022 18:46:08 +0000 https://binggallery.com/15-surprising-things-you-can-do-in-an-air-fryer/ paulaphoto / Shutterstock.com From 1970s food processors to 1990s juicers, home cooks love trendy kitchen appliances. And just when you think every culinary invention imaginable has had its day, a new one steals the show. In 2019, The New York Times called the air fryer the “kitchen appliance of the moment”. Air fryers are simple […]]]>
paulaphoto / Shutterstock.com

From 1970s food processors to 1990s juicers, home cooks love trendy kitchen appliances. And just when you think every culinary invention imaginable has had its day, a new one steals the show. In 2019, The New York Times called the air fryer the “kitchen appliance of the moment”.

Air fryers are simple – they are small countertop convection ovens that simulate frying without immersing the food in oil. Sarah Patrick owns AirFrying.net with her husband, David, and their site features air frying recipes, reviews, and tips.

Patrick tells me that she didn’t even own a deep fryer before she bought the website, but she can’t imagine a kitchen without a deep fryer anymore. She owns eight different fryers and has given some away to her family and friends. She now has two – a toaster style, a basket style.

“I like air frying for the speed and convenience,” says Patrick. “It’s faster than the oven and more convenient than the stovetop, making multitasking in the kitchen easier.”

For Patrick, tater tots are the epitome of the air fryer.

“I make them in every air fryer we review,” she says. “An air fryer helps make a quick meal even faster.”

Patrick says the items she most often makes in the air fryer are frozen ready meals – tater tots, fries, chicken nuggets, pizzas and the like.

She offers some general tips for using the air fryer:

  • The cooking time for an item in an air fryer depends on the size of your air fryer and the capacity to food ratio. For example, the cooking time for a hamburger patty in a small 2-quart air fryer will be different than for a hamburger in a large 8-quart fryer. Most recipes recommend checking or turning your food halfway through cooking. This gives you the ability to check for doneness and adjust the time or temperature as needed by your device.
  • Do not use cooking spray (like Pam) in your air fryer. This can degrade the non-stick properties of your device.
  • Use appropriate oils with a high smoke point. The Patricks don’t use oil often, but when they do, they prefer an oil spray with avocado oil.

Patrick introduced me to some of his favorite and unusual recipes to make in an air fryer, and I tried a few for myself.

1. Hard-boiled eggs

Partially peeled boiled eggs on a counter.
Ildi Papp / Shutterstock.com

It’s not hard to boil eggs on the stovetop, but air frying them means they peel easier, says Patrick. “Hard-boiled eggs are definitely something you might not think of doing in your air fryer, but it works great.” His recipe notes that cooks should spray eggs with an oil suitable for air fryers, such as avocado, to ensure they don’t stick together.

I tried cooking eggs in the air fryer and was thrilled that there was no more egg smell in the air. One note: one of my eggs cracked and the air fryer apparently swirled the leaky yolk, dotting the shells. I was surprised to see brown speckled shells when I opened the fryer, but the dots disappeared right away. And they peeled well.

2. Grilled cheese sandwiches

girl eating grilled cheese sandwich
Sean Locke Photography / Shutterstock.com

Air Fried Grilled Cheese Sandwiches are one of Patrick’s favorite meals, she says.

“My personal advice – butter the outside of the bread, but use mayonnaise, or mustard if that’s how you roll it, on the inside of each slice,” she says. “Not only does it taste good, it helps the top slice of bread stick to the sandwich and not swirl around inside the air fryer.”

I made grilled cheese sandwiches in my air fryer and found them to be crispy and delicious! They came out even crispier than my usual method of making them in a frying pan.

3. Grill

Joshua Resnick / Shutterstock.com

Worried that you won’t have room in your kitchen for an air fryer? Well you might not need your toaster anymore — Patrick makes toast in his air fryer.

“We haven’t had a toaster since we got our first air fryer,” she says. “Note that your bread may fly inside the basket, but this helps toast it on both sides. You can also toast bagels, Pop-Tarts and more.

4. Baked Sweet Potatoes

Sweet potatoes
KarepaStock / Shutterstock.com

I like cooked sweet potatoes. Although they are simple to make in a regular oven, Patrick’s recipe saved me about 10 minutes and is a tasty and easy alternative.

5. Cupcakes

Ruth Black / Shutterstock.com

Cupcakes in an air fryer? Yes!

“People tend to forget that an air fryer is a countertop oven,” says Patrick. “Anything you can cook, you can air fry. If you don’t have a cupcake or muffin pan for your air fryer, use silicone molds.

I didn’t have silicone molds, so I used a regular cupcake pan in my toaster oven style air fryer. They came out unevenly browned but tasted delicious. My husband said he actually preferred the crispy tops the air fryer gave to the softer topped cupcakes they had when baked in a regular oven.

6. Spaghetti squash

spaghetti squash
vm2002 / Shutterstock.com

spaghetti squash makes a delicious noodle substitute for those on a low carb diet or needing to eliminate gluten. So, of course, you can cook it in the air fryer. Patrick says the resulting squash has the perfect al dente texture.

“Faster than baking, air fryers are a great way to prepare spaghetti squash,” she says.

7. Fried Pickles

Fried pickles
stbar1964 / Shutterstock.com

Breaded and fried pickles are a popular snack, but why wait for the festival to make them in the air fryer?

This recipe use Cajun seasoning, but use whatever seasoning you prefer,” says Patrick.

As a fair food fan, I had to try them. I didn’t have any panko or almond flour, but regular breadcrumbs worked fine. I didn’t bother to flip them, but they still browned pretty evenly.

8. Donuts

Woman eating glazed donuts
Dean Drobot / Shutterstock.com

Donuts? In an air fryer? “It’s a shortcut recipe using refrigerated cookie dough,” says Patrick.

My daughter and her friend were delighted. Personally, I prefer my From Scratch Donut Recipe which yields sweeter, less breaded donuts, but it’s a fun and quick option.

9. Fried Bolognese

Fried bologna sandwich and fries
Brent Hofacker / Shutterstock.com

“If you grew up eating fried bologna sandwiches, try air fry bolognasuggests Patrick.

It’s not one of my favorites, but if it’s one of yours, take Patrick’s suggestion to make a few cuts in the bologna slice before frying it. This will help it fry more evenly.

10. Corn on the cob

But
nature / Shutterstock.com

“Air frying corncob is as easy as grilling it,” explains Patrick.

And since my grill’s propane tank was empty, I gave it a try. My corn matched the size of my air fryer and was delicious. I sprinkled mine with Trader Joe’s Everything But the Bagel seasoning for some spice.

11. Baked Potatoes

Loaded Baked Potato
Brent Hofacker / Shutterstock.com

baked potatoes aren’t difficult to make in a regular oven, but I usually give them 45 minutes to an hour in this appliance. In the air fryer they were crispy on the outside, soft on the inside after only 40 minutes, so the air fryer saves me time on this food.

12. Hash browns

hash browns
Michelle Lee Photography / Shutterstock.com

My teenage daughter discovered fast food hash browns this year, but we don’t always fancy going through a drive-thru for our snack. Frozen hash browns can be popped in the air fryer and air fried for a nice even crunch.

13. Whole Chicken

Roast chicken
AS Food Studio / Shutterstock.com

“We cooks a 4.5 pound dry-rubbed chicken in a 4.6 quart air fryer for an hour,” Patrick tells me. “My husband said it was the juiciest chicken he’s ever had.”

14. S’mores

Smores S'mores
etorres / Shutterstock.com

Air fryer s’mores? “What’s not to like?” Patrick says of this favorite campsite.

Note that if you like to crisp your marshmallow in the campfire, this recipe won’t give you that experience. Air fried marshmallows toast evenly. But I found mine still had that irresistible crispy on the outside, gooey on the inside, and the chocolate melted beautifully.

15. French Toast

French toast and strawberries
Brent Hofacker / Shutterstock.com

I didn’t think that French toast I made in the air fryer would crisp just as well as one made on the stovetop, but I was wrong. It was a quick and convenient way to prepare breakfast.

Disclosure: The information you read here is always objective. However, we sometimes receive compensation when you click on links in our stories.

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