Fine Art Insurance – Bing Gallery http://binggallery.com/ Thu, 21 Oct 2021 15:01:37 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://binggallery.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/default-150x150.png Fine Art Insurance – Bing Gallery http://binggallery.com/ 32 32 Berkley One Launches in Two New States and the District of Columbia | Business https://binggallery.com/berkley-one-launches-in-two-new-states-and-the-district-of-columbia-business/ Thu, 21 Oct 2021 15:01:37 +0000 https://binggallery.com/berkley-one-launches-in-two-new-states-and-the-district-of-columbia-business/ MORRISTOWN, NJ – (BUSINESS WIRE) – October 21, 2021– Berkley One (a Berkley Company), a modern and sophisticated insurance provider for individuals and families, has expanded its personal insurance portfolio in Tennessee, Indiana and the District of Columbia. Coverage for Berkley One Classics collector vehicles is also launched in Idaho, Oregon and Washington. “We’ve had […]]]>

MORRISTOWN, NJ – (BUSINESS WIRE) – October 21, 2021–

Berkley One (a Berkley Company), a modern and sophisticated insurance provider for individuals and families, has expanded its personal insurance portfolio in Tennessee, Indiana and the District of Columbia. Coverage for Berkley One Classics collector vehicles is also launched in Idaho, Oregon and Washington.

“We’ve had incredible momentum this year,” says Kathy Tierney, President of Berkley One. “This launch continues to move us forward and showcase our solutions to clients and agent partners in three new geographies for personal insurance and three new states for Berkley One Classics. Tierney adds, “We balance each expansion with attention to our existing portfolio and, with this launch, we have made improvements to our product, pricing and agent experience in active states. “

In Tennessee and the District of Columbia, Berkley One now offers insurance for homes, condos and tenants, automobiles, fine art and collectibles, third party liability, and excessive flood and flooding. In Indiana, these insurance solutions are complemented by vintage vehicle and pleasure boat options.

Collector vehicle coverage, offered through Berkley One Classics, has expanded to Idaho, Oregon and Washington and is available through agents having a Classics appointment with Berkley One.

Berkley One’s current footprint includes Arizona, Colorado, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Texas, Vermont, Virginia and Wisconsin. The collector’s vehicle is available as a stand-alone product in Idaho, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota, and Washington and the Marine Recreational Vehicle is available as a stand-alone product in Maine and the Missouri.

About Berkley One: Berkley One is a member company of Berkley, one of the nation’s leading commercial property and casualty insurance providers, whose insurance company members are rated A + (Superior) by AM Best Company. Founded in 1967, WR Berkley Corporation operates worldwide through more than 50 operating units and reported $ 8.8 billion in gross premiums written in 2020.

Products and services are provided by one or more subsidiaries of WR Berkley Corporation insurance companies. Not all products and services are available in all jurisdictions, and the specific coverage offered by any insurer is subject to the actual terms and conditions of the policies issued.

View source version on businesswire.com:https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20211021005044/en/

CONTACT: Christoph Ritterson

Berkley One

312-586-4298

critterson@berkleyone.com

KEYWORD: NEW JERSEY UNITED STATES NORTH AMERICA

INDUSTRY KEYWORD: PROFESSIONAL INSURANCE SERVICES

SOURCE: Berkley One

Copyright Business Wire 2021.

PUB: 10/21/2021 11:00 a.m. / DISC: 10/21/2021 11:01 a.m.

http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20211021005044/en

Copyright Business Wire 2021.


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How Much Money Do You Have: Gene Simmons https://binggallery.com/how-much-money-do-you-have-gene-simmons/ Tue, 19 Oct 2021 13:00:37 +0000 https://binggallery.com/how-much-money-do-you-have-gene-simmons/ Gene Simmons, singer and singer of KISS tax skeptic, likes to earn money. He’s gone to great lengths to expand his’ 70s glam rock band into a merchandising empire so vast that one person can dress their baby in a KISS-branded bib one morning and bury their uncle in one.KISS Kasket“at dusk. Most often, this […]]]>

Gene Simmons, singer and singer of KISS tax skeptic, likes to earn money. He’s gone to great lengths to expand his’ 70s glam rock band into a merchandising empire so vast that one person can dress their baby in a KISS-branded bib one morning and bury their uncle in one.KISS Kasket“at dusk. Most often, this sighting comes from Simmons himself. In 2002, he describe her signature make-up to Terry Gross as “a banker model”, because “when you look at him it says ‘Boy, this guy has a lot of money.’ “

In 2014, when Rolling stone the writer showed up at his Beverly Hills mansion for a profile, Simmons showed him around his merchandise “wing”, where display cases held “thousands” of KISS merchandise items (“coffee mugs; motorcycle helmets; plates; blankets; demonic Mr. Potato Heads; sneakers; bibs; ; a bowling ball ”) from which, the author noted, the only thing missing was“ a cash register ”. Pointing to a KISS-branded slot machine, Simmons added, “This box makes more money than most bands that spin.” In a BBC room the following year, Simmons gets straight to the point: “I will never stop chasing more money, I will never have enough.”

In any case, this background helps explain both Simmons’ latest self-reinvention (as well as his appearance in this series, in which I ask people how much money they have) – as a painter with an exhibition titled “Gene Simmons Artworks” debuting in Las Vegas on October 21st. The gallery, which also shows the work of artists like Dr Seuss, Charles Schultz and Banksy, is called Animazing Gallery. Simmons sells paintings there for up to $ 300,000. He went on a press tour to promote the show – this is how we ended up on a Zoom call that started like this:

Tarpley: I’ll just make sure I have a backup recording [of this call].

Uncomfortable: Oh, you made the Kardashians growl. I have noticed this over the past five years. Women start to talk like this [mimes girl voice] and then at the end of the sentence, it’s okay or-ow-ow-ow-ttt.

Tarpley: Yes, people love to talk about it, that’s for sure.

Uncomfortable: Yeah, yeah, it happens at the end of the feeling. What is that?

Tarpley: This is called vocal frying.

Uncomfortable: It’s called “I don’t like that”.

Simmons went on to explain that at the start of the pandemic, he found himself quarantined in a warehouse-like space large enough to serve as an art studio. A longtime doodler who never trained in the fine arts, Simmons spent his time painting with an assortment of paintbrushes, garden tools and “afro-combs.” He is inspired by artists such as Jackson Pollack, Andy Warhol, Banksy and the painters of “ReNAYssance” he said (“which, by the way, is the right way to put it”). What impress his friend, owner of Animazing, who gave him a show.

The paintings are worth seeing – as are the videos of Simmons painting in a blouse and talking to the camera (“I’m Gene Simmons, and believe it or not, I paint”) – if only to reassure one extremely wealthy 72-year-old person still needs a hobby. But as Simmons said, “Life is business and business is art, and the best art makes great business and the best business makes great art, and vice versa.” So for our purposes, we’re going to focus on the real art – the business. Here’s what Simmons said about it:

Tarpley: We have a series on Gawker called “How Much Money Do You Have?” ” How much money do you have?

Uncomfortable: How much money do i have?

Tarpley: Yes. When Terry Gross demand you in 2002, you said, ‘I have more money than NPR.’

Uncomfortable: What a PR?

Tarpley: That NOTRP.

Uncomfortable: Oh, that NPR? It’s true.

Tarpley: Is it still true? I just checked their finances. They said [in 2020] they have 127 million dollars [in net assets], when you incur debt.

Uncomfortable: They can polish my shoes.

Tarpley: OK.

Uncomfortable: Hahaha. By the way, this Terry Gross story ended up meaning something to some people – it meant nothing to me. [Ed. Note: Simmons is referring here to the controversy surrounding their 2002 interview, in which he told Gross, among other things: “If you want to welcome me with open arms, I’m afraid you’re also going to have to welcome me with open legs.” Gross responded: “That’s a really obnoxious thing to say.”] My recollection is that I walked into an apartment on the Upper East Side to do an interview and met, in my opinion, someone who was not so welcoming because I walked in with big bushy hair. and leather and all that stuff. Understood. I didn’t look like your next door neighbor. First question, so tell me about “The Kiss”. I said ‘The To kiss? Tell me about this NPR, which looks like a communicable disease. She says, “Well, you can’t say that about the NPR. Of course I can. What do you mean The To kiss? We didn’t get along at all. I found her abrasive, self-centered, and I said it.

Tarpley: Law. Google thinks your net worth is $ 400 million, does that sound correct to you?

Uncomfortable: Google. Google. Google. Ha ha ha ha.

Simmons, who has ballpark in several press appearances, the number of women he slept with (around 5,000) declined to be exact figures. But he shed some light on some of his other businesses. Namely: that his campaign for the brand of any image or phrase that relates from a distance to his companies is alive and well. Simply put, Simmons is obsessed with trademarks. In 2017, Vice reported that Simmons had registered for some 182 trademarks, including: “Chefs of Rock”, “Exotic Car Wash”, “Naked Car Wash”, “Nude Car Wash”, “Topless Car Wash”, “Symposium of Success”, ” Trophy Wife “,” Baby 101 “,” Sextacy “,” Dominatrix “,” Dominatrex “,” Me, Inc “,” Icarus “,” Women Are From Mars – Men Have? Enis “and just:”? Enis “.

At the time, only 44 of these requests were successful. Now there are at least 256 trademark registrations related to Simmons – some filed in the past two months (only 19 are officially registered, the rest are dead or under review). Two recent claims still under review relate to the use of the phrase “Gene Simmons Artworks,” the name of his Vegas show. Explaining his reasoning, Simmons said he drew the font “Artworks”: “I made the“ A ”big. I made a big ‘W’, and like most things I create, I put it down.

Many of his other branding attempts are pecuniary in nature. Of the 31 claims filed by “The Gene Simmons Company” in 2021, 16 involve images or words literally related to money; five others list their use as “precious metals and their alloys, in the form of ingots and coins, namely gold ingots and coins; gold ingots. In September alone, Simmons registered trademarks on the words: “Moneybag”, “Moneycoin” and “Mneycoin”. Others involve images of bags of money, two of which have a dollar sign, two for the bag of money with a dollar sign embossed on a coin (several others for a coin engraved with the Statue of Liberty bearing sunglasses), and bags of money marked with a Yuan sign, a pound sign, the Pi symbol, the euro, the Dogecoin symbol and the bitcoin “₿”.

This is not a new obsession. The Vice article noted that in 2017, Simmons filed for a trademark application for “multiple images of bags with dollar signs on them.” And in the years that followed, Simmons requested several variations of the same themes. His reasoning, says Simmons, is “because it makes so much money.” We do not know how many:

Tarpley: You say if someone uses the bitcoin logo they have to pay you.

Uncomfortable: Incorrect. The bitcoin logo is in the public domain, but if I put a bag of money around you have to pay me. OK? And the euro sign, if someone had put a euro sign on a bag of money, they would have paid me.

Tarpley: How much would they pay you?

Uncomfortable: That’s what I want. Whatever the legal system allows.

Tarpley: Has this ever happened?

Uncomfortable: Yes. It happens regularly. Occasionally, but money is money.

Laura Franco, a trademark attorney at the San Francisco law firm Winston and Strawn, says this slightly misrepresents Simmons’ trademark rights. “I’ve been at the front row and the center of KISS shows, but you can’t just brand and say ‘it’s mine’,” she explained. “You have to take that brand, put it on the market, get people to start recognizing it as a brand, and only then do you have rights.”

Even though Simmons didn’t directly answer my question about how much money he has, it’s clear he has many sources of income. He said he took money out of his cannabis company, “Invictus” and “Cool Springs” – the life insurance business he started in 2012. He preferred to call it “strategy. life equity “or” your plan when they hang around you kick and scream underground. The main thing to strategize about, he explained, is how much will go to taxes. “Because you know government is big and bad,” Simmons said. “It’s not corporate governance. It’s just hands in your pocket.

The money bag thing has been pretty lucrative, Simmons said; He owns Soda bag and MoneyBag Vodka, and claims to have recently signed an agreement with a Chinese clothing manufacturer for a “complete line of Moneybag clothing, jewelry and all.” If none of those other apps work, he still has a few years on his mark for the word “Zipper,” the name of his short-lived comic book series.

This is a series called How much money do you have where I ask people how much money they have in total. The last installation was with Gawker owner Bryan Goldberg.


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Where do millionaires keep their money? – The Madison Chief’s Gazette https://binggallery.com/where-do-millionaires-keep-their-money-the-madison-chiefs-gazette/ Mon, 18 Oct 2021 22:15:50 +0000 https://binggallery.com/where-do-millionaires-keep-their-money-the-madison-chiefs-gazette/ Where do millionaires keep their money? High net worth individuals invest money in different classes of financial and real assets, including stocks, mutual funds, retirement accounts, and real estate. Most of the 20.27 million millionaires in the United States did not inherit their money; only about 20% inherited their money. Over two-thirds of all millionaires […]]]>

Where do millionaires keep their money? High net worth individuals invest money in different classes of financial and real assets, including stocks, mutual funds, retirement accounts, and real estate. Most of the 20.27 million millionaires in the United States did not inherit their money; only about 20% inherited their money. Over two-thirds of all millionaires are entrepreneurs. Here are some of the places the real rich keep their money.

Whether you are a millionaire or not, a financial advisor can help you take important steps to reach your goals.

Cash and cash equivalents

Many, and perhaps most, millionaires are frugal. If they spent their money, they wouldn’t have any to get rich. They spend on necessities and some luxuries, but they save and expect their whole family to do the same. Many millionaires keep a large portion of their money in cash or highly liquid cash equivalents. They set up an emergency account before they start investing. Millionaires cash in differently than the rest of us. All the bank accounts they have are managed by a private banker who probably also manages their wealth. There is no queue at the cashier window.

Studies indicate that millionaires can, on average, have up to 25% of their money in cash. This is to compensate for any decline in the market and to have cash available as insurance for their portfolio. Cash equivalents, financial instruments almost as liquid as cash. are popular investments for millionaires. Examples of cash equivalents are money market mutual funds, certificates of deposit, commercial paper and treasury bills.

Some millionaires keep their money in treasury bills which they continue to renew and reinvest. They liquidate them when they need money. Treasury bills are short-term notes issued by the US government to raise funds. Treasury bills are usually bought at a discount. When you sell them, the difference between the face value and the selling price is your profit. Warren Buffett, CEO of Berkshire Hathaway, has a portfolio full of money market accounts and treasury bills.

Millionaires also have zero balance accounts with private banks. They leave their money in cash and cash equivalents and they write checks on their zero balance account. At the end of the business day, the private bank, as the custodian of their various accounts, sells enough cash to settle that day. Millionaires don’t worry about FDIC insurance. Their money is held in their name and not in the name of the private custodian bank.

Other millionaires have safes filled with cash denominated in many different currencies. These vaults are located all over the world and each currency is held in a country where transactions are carried out using that currency.

Immovable

Luxurious house

For over 200 years, investing in real estate has been the most popular investment for millionaires to keep their money. For all these years, real estate investments have been the primary vehicle for millionaires to build and maintain their wealth. The trend started with the purchase of a primary residence and then other residences, generally for tenants. After buying personal real estate, they started buying commercial real estate like office buildings, hotels, stadiums, bridges, etc.

Millionaires often have large real estate portfolios. Once they establish themselves as buyers in the real estate market, real estate agents start offering them deals and it is easy for them to get financing. Large investors have several million dollars tied up in real estate. Real estate is not an investment to count on for money, but it is a lucrative long term investment and a proven investment for millionaires as they love passive income and find real estate provides it. .

Equities and equity funds

Some millionaires favor simplicity. They invest in index funds and dividend paying stocks. They love the passive income from equity securities just as they love the passive rental income that real estate provides. They just don’t want to spend their time managing their investments.

Ultra-rich investors can have a controlling stake in one or more large companies. But, many millionaires hold a portfolio of a few equity securities. Many can own index funds because they generate decent returns and you don’t have to spend time managing them. They also have low management fees and excellent diversification. Millionaires also love dividend-paying stocks for the passive income they provide. Of course, they are also interested in capital appreciation, but for some it is less of a concern than generating current income.

Private Equity and Hedge Funds

Unless you are a multimillionaire, you cannot participate in a hedge fund or buy into a private equity fund. Public capital is well known since its shares are traded on the stock exchange. One of its advantages is its liquidity. You can easily liquidate your public stocks or stocks. Private equity funds, on the other hand, usually get their investments from large organizations like universities or pension funds. Private equity fund investors must be accredited investors with some equity, typically at least $ 250,000. Accredited investors can be individuals as well as organizations, but they are defined by regulation. In other areas, private equity funds don’t have to comply with as many regulations as private equity. Some ultra-rich, if they are accredited investors, invest in private equity.

Hedge funds are not the same as private equity. Hedge funds use mutual funds and pursue several strategies to generate disproportionate returns for their investors. Hedge funds invest in anything that fund managers believe will generate the highest possible short-term profits.

Merchandise

Commodities, like gold, silver, mineral rights or livestock, to name a few, are also storehouses of value for millionaires. But they do require storage and have a level of complexity that many millionaires just don’t want to handle.

Alternative investments

Wheel and cockpit on a beautiful wooden sailboat

Wheel and cockpit on a beautiful wooden sailboat

Some millionaires, as well as the ultra-rich, keep some of their money in other alternative investments such as tangible assets such as fine art, expensive musical instruments, or rare books. There are also millionaires and the ultra-rich who have invested in intellectual property rights such as the rights to songs or movies. These investments can be very lucrative.

Cryptocurrency

It is estimated that there are around 100,000 cryptocurrency millionaires, with the majority holding Bitcoin. To try to make a fortune in cryptocurrency you need to be willing to take risks and many millionaires are risk averse. You can take a small portion of a millionaire’s wealth and invest in one of the different cryptocurrencies. Many people have become millionaires this way. Some have lost their money. Increasingly, cryptocurrency is being accepted as a legitimate investment that deserves a look when trying to accumulate wealth.

The bottom line

Millionaires have many different investment philosophies, so it’s hard to generalize about where they keep their money. However, all of the above are legitimate investments for millionaires. They want reduced risk, which is why many prefer diversified investment portfolios. Many of these investments can be combined in an attempt to increase wealth.

Tips for investing

  • Would you like to study the growth of your investments? Check out SmartAsset’s free investment calculator.

  • Do you have questions on how to start investing? It is wise to start by consulting a financial advisor. Finding a qualified financial advisor doesn’t have to be difficult. SmartAsset’s free tool connects you with up to three financial advisors in your area, and you can interview your advisor matches at no cost to decide which one is best for you. If you’re ready to find an advisor who can help you reach your financial goals, start now.

Photo credit: © iStock.com / kafl, © iStock.com / tulcarion, © iStock.com / claudio.arnese

The Post Where do millionaires keep their money? first appeared on the SmartAsset blog.


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Sacred Drumbeat Feeds Spirit of Kearney Priest | Local News https://binggallery.com/sacred-drumbeat-feeds-spirit-of-kearney-priest-local-news/ Sun, 17 Oct 2021 13:00:00 +0000 https://binggallery.com/sacred-drumbeat-feeds-spirit-of-kearney-priest-local-news/ Faesser holds a bear claw necklace worn by the Lakota Sioux men. Imitation grizzly claws surround the otter’s fur. Mary Jane Skala, Kearney Hub By MARY JANE SKALA, Hub Editor Father Art Faesser considers his living room to be his sanctuary. Many artifacts hang on the walls, including an elaborate Sioux robe, cradle, drums, buffalo […]]]>





Faesser holds a bear claw necklace worn by the Lakota Sioux men. Imitation grizzly claws surround the otter’s fur.


Mary Jane Skala, Kearney Hub


By MARY JANE SKALA, Hub Editor

Father Art Faesser considers his living room to be his sanctuary. Many artifacts hang on the walls, including an elaborate Sioux robe, cradle, drums, buffalo head, and dozens of authentic pieces from the Lakota Sioux Reservation in South Dakota.



KEARNEY – Father Art Faesser considers his living room to be his sanctuary. A small crucifix hangs on the wall.

The same goes for an elaborate Sioux dress, cradle, drums, buffalo head, and dozens of authentic pieces from the Lakota Sioux Reservation in South Dakota.

These artifacts are spread throughout every room of his house. He has been acquiring them for 30 years from indigenous Lakota Sioux artists, because they convey a spiritual meaning.






Rev.  Faesser Art

Rev. Faesser Art


“In all my experiences in the priesthood, seeing what we had done to the natives gave me a great passion to find small ways to elevate their sense of dignity and human worth,” Faesser, a priest at the retreat that attends St. James Catholic Church, says.

Humble beginnings

Father Art likes to say: “This drum beat got me into it from an early age.

In the spring of 1952, he was only 3 years old when he, his brother Vic, 5, and their immigrant parents got off a train in Ogallala with about $ 25 in cash, two suitcases and a wooden trunk built by his. father, a carpenter. .






Tree stump drum

This drum rests on the floor in Faesser’s family room. It is made from a tree stump decorated with bear claws. It is the work of Lakota artist Tim Audiss.


Mary Jane Skala, Kearney Hub


Although the family is German, they came to the United States from Russia, where they had taught the Russians to cultivate. In Ogallala, they were greeted by their godfather, George McGinley. “Immigrants had to have a sponsor to provide them with housing, food, jobs, etc. ”Faesser said.


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Gainesville Town, Alachua County, Library District Investigated for Requiring Vaccine Documentation https://binggallery.com/gainesville-town-alachua-county-library-district-investigated-for-requiring-vaccine-documentation/ Wed, 13 Oct 2021 18:41:37 +0000 https://binggallery.com/gainesville-town-alachua-county-library-district-investigated-for-requiring-vaccine-documentation/ BY JENNIFER CABRERA The Florida Department of Health (FDOH) has announced that more than 100 entities and institutions in Florida are under investigation for requiring documents on immunization status, including “Lauren Poe, Mayor of Gainesville,” the Commission of Alachua County and Alachua County Library District. Yesterday, the FDOH announced the first large fine, $ 3.57 […]]]>

BY JENNIFER CABRERA

The Florida Department of Health (FDOH) has announced that more than 100 entities and institutions in Florida are under investigation for requiring documents on immunization status, including “Lauren Poe, Mayor of Gainesville,” the Commission of Alachua County and Alachua County Library District.

Yesterday, the FDOH announced the first large fine, $ 3.57 million to Leon County “for its blatant violation of the law relating to the prohibition of vaccine passports in our state.” This fine was imposed for 714 cases of violation of Florida’s ban on vaccine passports. The Leon County government ultimately laid off 14 employees. A copy of The Leon County Notice of Violation can be found here.

The FDOH now has the power to apply sanctions to applicable entities and institutions that require documentation of vaccination or post-exposure status. Floridians and visitors can file complaints at VaxPassFreeFL@FLHealth.gov, and the Department will review, assess, and investigate as necessary. Affected entities that are found to be in violation will be fined.

This law prohibits the following entities from requiring documentation of COVID-19 vaccination or post-infection recovery:

A business cannot require bosses or customers to provide documents certifying COVID-19 vaccination or post-infection recovery to access, enter, or receive service from business operations.

A government cannot require people to provide documents certifying COVID-19 vaccination or post-infection recovery to access, enter or benefit from government operations.

An educational institution may not require students or residents to provide documents certifying COVID-19 vaccination or post-infection recovery for attendance or registration, or to access, enter or benefit from a service of this educational institution.

FDOH published the following list of entities that are “under review” as of October 8; the list just seems to include all the entities that have been reported, so there is no way to know if they will be found to be in violation of the law:

Alachua County Council of Commissioners

Alachua County Library District

“Lauren Poe, Mayor of the Town of Gainesville”

Saint Edouard school

House of Blues

Universal ally

Amway Center

Grovenor House condominium

Kravis Center

The Rock Boat (Norwegian Cruise Line)

Raytheon Technologies

Moffitt Communications

Mini-mobile

“Allied Universal / G4S and Bay Care Health Systems”

Naples Community Hospital

“City of Miramar Vernon E. Hargray, City Manager”

Memorial West Hospital

“2021 I / ITSEC”

Daily Square

Straz

FDLE, Jacksonville area, Counter Terrorism Squad

Place live

American Gas Association

Miami Marlins

Metcalf, Jessica N

Dr Phillips Center / Walt Disney Theater (Broadway series)

Membership of CWA 3176

ECPI University

Mid Florida Credit Union (Zack Brown Concert)

AGM: 2021 Operations Conference

Feld Entertainment Studios

AdventHealth

Vertex Aerospace

ITHINK Financial Amphitheater / Concert Maroon 5

Broward Center for the Performing Arts and The Parker.

Titusville, Florida’s Space Coast

Gasparilla Music Festival

SYMPHONY OF THE NEW WORLD

Equinox

The MidFlorida Credit Union Amphitheater in Tampa

Armory Center for the Arts

International Union of Seafarers

AT&T

Sanibel’s Great Arts Island

Employees of JP Poindexter & Co.

Straz Performing Arts Center

Tampa Amphitheater

DoD employees

Orange County

Riverview High School Performing Arts Center

Carnival Cruise Line

Assurance Allion, Florida Amphitheater Live Nation

Live Nation Concerts – MIDFLORIDA Credit Union Amphitheater

Doctor Phillips Center

Royal Caribbean

Norton Museum

David A Straz Center

International Union of Seafarers

WBENC

“American Transit Association, Orange County Convention Center”

Florida Trails Association

Plantation Police Department

Jewel Toffier

Titanium Yoga – “VAX ONLY” Class

Orlando Lowndes Shakespeare Center

“Jerry Demings, Mayor of Orange County”

John’s Island Club

Geo game

Parachute Deland

Starbucks

Van Wezel Performing Arts Center

Coast is Clear Music Festival

Merrill Gardens at Champions Gate

Saber Legion Sponsored Event – Florida Charter: Called Florida Kyber Open on November 14 at XL Soccer World Orlando

Norton Art Gallery

Allegiant Airlines at Saint Petersburg / Clearwater Airport

American Maritime Officers Union / Training Center

4740 Grassendale Terrace

Amway Center – Harry Styles Concert

Florida Repertory Theater

Military defense contractor

Disney cruise line

MidFlorida Credit Union Amphitheater

Leidos

Tampa Amphitheater / Live Nation Event

Mid FL Amphitheater – David Aldean Concert

Government contractor for Booz Allen

Title of Integrity and Guarantee LLC

Northrop Grumman

Leon County Government, County Administrator Vincent S. Long



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Tokio Marine Highland adds fine arts to its range of specialized insurance offerings https://binggallery.com/tokio-marine-highland-adds-fine-arts-to-its-range-of-specialized-insurance-offerings/ Mon, 11 Oct 2021 12:12:00 +0000 https://binggallery.com/tokio-marine-highland-adds-fine-arts-to-its-range-of-specialized-insurance-offerings/ Insurance coverage for collectable art objects for art dealers, exhibitions, museums and private corporate collections Tweet this “Christiane’s reputation and in-depth expertise are highly respected in the fine art world,” said Pat blandford, CEO of Tokio Marine Highland. “Her leadership and the team she is building will position Tokio Marine Highland at the forefront of […]]]>

“Christiane’s reputation and in-depth expertise are highly respected in the fine art world,” said Pat blandford, CEO of Tokio Marine Highland. “Her leadership and the team she is building will position Tokio Marine Highland at the forefront of the fine art insurance space. Our heritage has been built on specialized and niche insurance markets, and this new product line is a perfect complement to the innovative products and services that our customers know and expect. “

“I am very passionate about the world of fine art insurance and look forward to joining an organization in the midst of an exciting transformation,” said Fischer. “We look forward to providing brokers with customized solutions to meet the complex needs of their clients and to offer world-class service and convenient claims management. We have a highly skilled team who share my commitment to providing the best fine art insurance experience. in industry.”

Fischer is a member of the Board of Trustees of the Isamu Noguchi Art Museum, the International Foundation for Artistic Research (IFAR), the Conservation Center, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum Conservation Council, and the National Jewelry Institute.

Founded in 1962, Tokio Marine Highland (formerly WNC Insurance Services) is a wholly owned company of Tokio marine oven, one of Lloyd’s of London insurance market, rated A + by Standard & Poor’s for its financial strength, and member of the Tokio Marine Group.

About Tokio Marine Highland

Tokyo Marine highlands is a leading property and casualty underwriting agency providing distinct specialty risk management solutions including private flood, construction, fine art, specialty properties, real estate investments, and lender-placed insurance. Tokyo Marine highlands also includes Precise Adjustments, a wholly owned subsidiary that provides advanced claims capabilities.

Founded in 1962, Tokio Marine Highland Insurance Services, Inc. (formerly WNC Insurance Services, Inc.) is a wholly owned company of Tokio Marine Kiln, one of Lloyd’s of London insurance market, rated A + by Standard & Poor’s for its financial strength, and member of the Tokio Marine Group. Tokyo Marine Highland home office is located in Chicago, Illinois, with operating centers in Dallas, Texas, Irvine, California, Miami, Florida, Naperville, Illinois, and South Pasadena, California.

For more information visit our website at www.tokiomarinehighland.com.

Media contact:

Joshua Clifton
Vice-President, Marketing and Communications
312-736-2351 (office)
773-230-1304 (portable)
[email protected]

SOURCE Tokio Marine Highland

Related links

http://www.tokiomarinehighland.com


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Don’t have insurance? Can you legally drive a car in New York State? https://binggallery.com/dont-have-insurance-can-you-legally-drive-a-car-in-new-york-state/ Sat, 09 Oct 2021 17:03:45 +0000 https://binggallery.com/dont-have-insurance-can-you-legally-drive-a-car-in-new-york-state/ Driving a car and you don’t have insurance? Is it legal? It actually depends. It’s your car ? Does this car have insurance? Is it a rental? Are they your friends? These seem to be the means around YOU of not having auto insurance. You can legally drive any of the cars in the above […]]]>

Driving a car and you don’t have insurance? Is it legal?

It actually depends. It’s your car ? Does this car have insurance? Is it a rental? Are they your friends? These seem to be the means around YOU of not having auto insurance. You can legally drive any of the cars in the above situation, as long as you have a legal / valid driver’s license for that category of vehicle.

But what about the other times? Suppose you are a day or two late with your payment?

Insurance companies communicate electronically with the Department of Motor Vehicles. What does it mean? Big Brother aka the DMV and New York State is still watching you.

If you get pulled over in your car and you don’t have insurance, what can happen?

  • You can get arrested and get a lapsed ticket.
  • Your car may be impounded. Then you will need to pay extra fee to get it back.
  • The DMV will say thank you for playing, but let’s go, by withdrawing your driver’s license and your registration card.

What if your friend or someone else borrowed your uninsured car?

  • If your car is in an accident and you knowingly let someone drive your car when you didn’t have insurance, then YOU still get the penalties. Yes, you will have to pay fines and penalties, and the DMV can revoke your license for at least a year. Plus, there are additional fees you can potentially pay when spending your day in traffic court.

Here’s something to remember, if you don’t have auto insurance, say it’s expired or you just can’t afford it? Park your car and turn over the plates, avoid the headache of additional future expenses.

Over 100 “fun facts” about the Hudson Valley

Did you know that Lucille Ball made her debut on stage in the Hudson Valley? How about Philadelphia Cream Cheese was invented not in Philadelphia, but in Orange County? Or that a Dutchess County mansion inspired the phrase “follow the Joneses?” »Find out and over 100 other fun facts about the Hudson Valley.

5 types of apple pie you’ll find in New York City

There are many different types of apple pies, here are a few that you will find while eating some of the best pies in New York State.

Photos: Mustang pinned under tractor-trailer near I-84 in the Hudson Valley

A Mustang struck a tractor-trailer near I-84 in the Hudson Valley.

The 10 places you’re most likely to crash on I-84 between Danbury and Waterbury

I have noticed that motor vehicle accidents very often occur in the same areas of I-84 between Danbury and Waterbury, here are 10 of the most common areas where accidents have been reported

6 things that are no longer in cars

Things you don’t find in cars anymore.

The Fast 5 – Five of the fastest cars in the world

In 2020, these cars were considered some of the fastest production cars in the world.

Fire destroys car in Crossgates parking lot in Guilderland


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The Recorder – Worlds That Could Never Light Up At Rockwell: Fantastic Images From 1589 To The Present https://binggallery.com/the-recorder-worlds-that-could-never-light-up-at-rockwell-fantastic-images-from-1589-to-the-present/ Fri, 08 Oct 2021 18:00:57 +0000 https://binggallery.com/the-recorder-worlds-that-could-never-light-up-at-rockwell-fantastic-images-from-1589-to-the-present/ “Everyone loves his illusions… They need it just as they need air. Shadows and fog (1991 film) The stuff of dreams – demons, angels, heroes, heroines, dragons, knights and princesses await, their images dominating the galleries of the Norman Rockwell Museum in Stockbridge. Until October 31, you can see 140 works by 100 artists, some […]]]>

“Everyone loves his illusions…

They need it just as they need air.

Shadows and fog (1991 film)

The stuff of dreams – demons, angels, heroes, heroines, dragons, knights and princesses await, their images dominating the galleries of the Norman Rockwell Museum in Stockbridge. Until October 31, you can see 140 works by 100 artists, some of them centuries old, all conveying illusions, mysteries, and every culture’s passionate desire for fantasy illustration.

“Fantasy is important,” Jesse Kowalski noted in a recent video, “because humanity has a natural desire for ascension, a need for ritual, and a need for self-improvement. ”

He is the museum’s curator, known for presenting unique exhibits such as the work of cartoonists William Hanna and Joseph Barbera (“The Flintstones, etc.”) and the first major exhibition of the illustrator and author’s work. from Hampshire County, Tony DiTerlizzi.

By creating “Enchanted: A History of Fantasy Illustration” and publishing its eponymous 232-page accompanying catalog (Abbeville Press; $ 45) the curator has cast a wide net.

He researched heroic legends ranging from “The Epic of Gilgamesh”, an epic poem written in 2100 BC. Among other books, Kowalski looked at the collected works of psychoanalyst Carl Jung, who wrote on “the gray mists of Neolithic prehistory. Mankind has never lacked powerful images to provide magical aid against all the strange things that dwell in the depths of the psyche.

“(Fantasy) is a human need that helps explain who we are and clarifies our place in the world,” Kowalski said.

Legends are everywhere. The national animal of Scotland is the unicorn, and in Iceland, a survey concluded that the majority of the population believe, or think possible, the existence of elves. The “huldufolk” (hidden people) can be found in the Viking archives of 1000 AD. In this country we also have many myths: Bigfoot, Diets, Hollywood and the Lottery.

Kowalski also read the writings of Joseph Campbell, whose career has been devoted to the study of mythologies and comparative religions. The author is best known for suggesting that every culture has a pervasive “hero” myth. This character sets out on a journey that defies his being, but he overcomes all obstacles to come back more powerful, often to save his community.

By organizing this first large-scale original exhibition of fantastic art and illustration, Kowalski wisely excluded guns, technology, and spaceships. Fantasy, he noted, is a world that could never exist, while science fiction is based on fact.

Popularize the dwarves

Rich Bradway, the museum’s director of digital learning, organized a tour of the galleries. He said that Kowalski, when planning the exhibition, knew that “fantasy art doesn’t start in 1970, it dates back to Greek mythology”.

In the first gallery you will find a dramatic depiction of “Apollo slaying the python”, rendered in black ink and wash from 1690 by the Dutchman Willem Van Miers. The Greek poet Ovid describes the reptilian rumble, noting that the dying monster was “pierced by a thousand arrows”. Here we have four more economical arrows, but the winged beast is no more and Apollo has acquired real estate in Delphi. Over the centuries the myth has gained popularity among sculptors and painters and in these galleries you will find that dragons and winged snakes remain very popular and frightening.

Also influenced by the words of Ovid, the Dutch master engraver Hendrick Goltzius engraved in 1589 “Creation of the four elements”. It is energetic work in which a muscular deity, centered on a crescent of fire, brings to life a swirling earth below.

Bradway explained that an original idea was to have a touchscreen in a smoky spherical shape suggesting a witch’s cauldron. It would provide a wealth of information on art and artists. Since last year, however, most of us have put a lot of “touchy-feelies” on hold.

“When COVID happened, we pretty much denied that concept,” the director said. He added that the exhibit may have been much larger, however, with all of the museum and private contributions to the exhibit, the costs of transportation and insurance have become complex.

“We had to cut it down,” Bradway said, “but it’s still one hell of a big show.”

Steps from Apollo’s Arrows is a century-old NC Wyeth painting “Bruce on the Beach,” in which medieval swordsmen Robert the Bruce and William Wallace shake hands before joining in the battle. Other ‘golden age’ illustrators are here in abundance, from Howard Pyle and Max Parrish to Jessie Wilcox Smith and Arthur Rackham. The brilliantly brilliant diary design also caught Kowalski’s interest and you will find black and white panels of a surreal 1906 Winsor McCay’s “Little Nemo” and Hal Foster’s elegant “Prince Valiant”.

In modern times, the 1977 bestseller “Faeries” by Brian Froud and Alan Lee has provided a comprehensive field guide to these magical dwarves, sparking a renewed interest in romantic and illusory characters.

Froud went on to create, among other projects, costumes and concept art for films such as “The Dark Crystal” by puppeteer Jim Henson. Lee, also wanted, was the concept artist for “The Lord of the Rings” and the Hobbit movies. Examples of their work are in the show.

Modern times and ancient times

“If you were to try to create a line in the sand,” Bradway said, “when did fantasy art come to the forefront of popular culture, I would say Frank Frazetta was one of the ancestors.”

The late artist has enjoyed a meteoric rise, catching the attention of film producers after he taunted Beatles drummer Ringo Starr for “MAD” magazine. He had started as an inker for comics and had grown to create movie posters, record cover designs, magazine illustrations, and a plethora of science fiction book illustrations.

There are two of her paintings here and an oil from 1972, “Escape on Venus” depicts a muscular woman who caught the eye of a hungry tiger. Frazetta often portrayed the woman as strong and independent and at times tottering on the optional border of clothing. The artist played a key role in popularizing images from “The Hobbit” and “The Lord of the Rings”.

You’ll also find artwork by Tim and Greg Hildebrandt, who produced calendars for this latest classic and concept art by Tolkien for the first ‘Star Wars’.

It is said that Hollywood is always chasing images from the past. Briton John Martin was obsessed with biblical catastrophes and the Underworld. In the 1820s he created several images for John Milton’s “Paradise Lost”. His dramatic take on “Satan in Council,” a lone figure atop a sphere in a cavernous arena, was the inspiration for the Galactic Senate in a 1999 Star Wars film.

You yourself may be inspired by the works and career of Julie Bell. She had worked in book illustration, later posing as a model, then becoming a nationally ranked bodybuilder and competitor. She then returns to illustration and creates virtually photographic images in oil. “Pegasus Befriends the Muses” from 2018 is a masterpiece of female form riding on a winged horse surrounded by swirling colors. She is the mother of artists Anthony and David Palumbo. Examples of their works are also in the exhibition.

The images range from the comic to the grave. The centerpiece could well be Gustave Doré’s 24-square-foot painting “The Black Eagle of Prussia”. A winged and wounded woman, representing France and guarding her war dead, is defeated with a broken sword as a huge voracious bird descends on her. The image defines the artist’s fears about the future of France during the Franco-Prussian War of 1870.

Ironically, in 2014, David Palumbo created an oil image “The Fallen”, showing an armored and exhausted woman, sword in hand, guarding the dead of World War I.

The artist was unaware of Doré’s previous image and upon seeing it Bradway said Palumbo was inspired by awe, while also being surprised that his vision was not original.

Elihu Vedder’s Sea Serpent’s Lair was on loan from the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston in 1864, an image so subtle that people often pay little attention to the painting, seeing it as mere landscape. Coiled up in the dunes is a nightmarish reptile. Using the same title, in 2019 Justin Gerard painted a huge, horrifying horrible snake in the depths, entwined among the wrecks of colonial-era wooden ships. To paraphrase a quote from John Steinbeck: “It’s good that we have our monsters in the depths, otherwise the oceans would be like a dreamless sleep.” ”

“Enchanted: A History of Fantasy Illustration” continues through October 31. Museum opening hours: Thursday to Tuesday. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Closed on Wednesdays. Admission: Adults, $ 20; students, $ 10; 18 and under, free. Important: A repair of the bridge is in progress. If you are traveling on Route 183, take the detour on West Hawthorne Road to Stockbridge. Signs will direct you to the museum.


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Daily Fundraising Roundup – October 5, 2021 https://binggallery.com/daily-fundraising-roundup-october-5-2021/ Wed, 06 Oct 2021 14:56:19 +0000 https://binggallery.com/daily-fundraising-roundup-october-5-2021/ Of course, we raised $ 100 million; Honor landed $ 70 million; Pandion got $ 30 million Masterpieces: Masterworks is a New York-based company that sells fractions of shares of works of art to retail investors. Masterworks has raised $ 110 million in Series A funding. The round, which represents the company’s first outside investment, […]]]>

Of course, we raised $ 100 million; Honor landed $ 70 million; Pandion got $ 30 million

Masterpieces: Masterworks is a New York-based company that sells fractions of shares of works of art to retail investors. Masterworks has raised $ 110 million in Series A funding. The round, which represents the company’s first outside investment, was led by Left Lane Capital, with participation from Galaxy Interactive and Tru Arrow Partners, among others. Read more

Sure: Sure is an insurance infrastructure startup based in Santa Monica, California. Sure has raised $ 100 million in Series C funding co-led by Declaration Partners and Kinnevik, with participation from WndrCo and previous backers WR Berkley and Menlo Ventures. Read more

Honor: Honor is a San Francisco-based senior care network and technology platform. Honor has raised $ 70 million in Series E financing and $ 300 million in debt financing. Baillie Gifford led the equity financing with participation from previous investors, including funds and accounts advised by T. Rowe Price, Home Place founders Paul and Lori Hogan, Prosus Ventures, Andreessen Horowitz, Thrive Capital, FMZ Ventures, Rock Springs Capital, Lighthouse Capital Markets, and TriplePoint Capital. Perceptive Advisors led the debt financing with a “significant commitment” from Ares Management funds. Read more

Pandion: Pandion is a Seattle-based online parcel delivery company. Pandion has raised $ 30 million in Series A funding from Bow Capital, Telstra Ventures, Playground Global, Schematic Ventures, AME Cloud Ventures and Innovation Endeavors. Company founder and CEO Scott Ruffin recently spent two years as vice president and e-commerce transport manager at Walmart eCommerce. Read more

Ordinary actions: Commonstock is a San Francisco-based social investment platform for trades and financial markets. Commonstock has raised $ 25 million in Series A funding led by Coatue, with participation from QED, Floodgate, Upside Ventures, Resolute Ventures and Abstract Ventures, among others. Founder and CEO David McDonough previously spent over six years working at Google on product strategy. Read more

Authorize: Autify is a software test automation platform based in San Francisco and Tokyo. Autify raised $ 10 million in Series A funding. The World Innovation Lab led the round, joined by Uncorrelated Ventures and individual investor Jonathan Siegel. The original backers Archetype Ventures, Salesforce Ventures and Tably also participated. Read more

Memgraph: Memgraph is a London-based platform for real-time streaming graphics applications. Memgraph has raised $ 9.34 million in seed funding led by M12. Heavybit Industries, In-Q-Tel, Counterview Capital, ID4 Ventures and Mundi Ventures also participated in the round. Read more

Podcastle: Podcastle is a Bay Area-based podcast creation platform that aims to help podcasters easily create, edit and distribute production-quality podcasts. Podcastle has raised $ 7 million in funding co-led by RTP Global and Point Nine Capital. Read more

Render.ai: Rendered.ai is a synthetic data company based in Bellevue, Virginia. Rendered.ai has raised $ 6 million in seed funding led by Space Capital, with participation from Congruent Ventures, Tectonic Ventures, Union Labs and Uncorrelated Ventures. Read more

Made of air: Made of Air is a Berlin manufacturer of “carbon negative” thermoplastics. Made of Air has raised $ 5.8 million led by a Norwegian family fund focused on sustainability called TD Veen. Other round participants include Tuesday Capital, EQT Group, and numerous individual investors, including former Google CFO Patrick Pichette. Read more

Hot glue: Hotglue is a Washington, DC-based startup that wants to make it easier for developers to connect to business apps like Salesforce. Hotglue has raised $ 1.5 million in seed funding led by Uncommon Capital and a group of angel investors. Read more

If you would like to be included in our tour de table, submit your press release or blog post on your tour de table to kristin@vator.tv. If you want a longer item, please give us a few days in advance. If you would like to be featured in our Entrepreneur column today, please send me your Vator profile.

Image by David Yu of Pixabay


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Doctor X is an insane pre-code Technicolor horror blast and it’s now streaming https://binggallery.com/doctor-x-is-an-insane-pre-code-technicolor-horror-blast-and-its-now-streaming/ Tue, 05 Oct 2021 15:11:00 +0000 https://binggallery.com/doctor-x-is-an-insane-pre-code-technicolor-horror-blast-and-its-now-streaming/ “Pre-code Hollywood” refers to that brief, beautiful window between 1929 and 1934 when studios weren’t strictly enforcing the Motion Picture Production Code / Hays Code, and you’d see more adult content and themes in the footage from studio before the arrival of production code administration. and began to castrate films. Because it was made during […]]]>

“Pre-code Hollywood” refers to that brief, beautiful window between 1929 and 1934 when studios weren’t strictly enforcing the Motion Picture Production Code / Hays Code, and you’d see more adult content and themes in the footage from studio before the arrival of production code administration. and began to castrate films. Because it was made during this window, “Doctor X” has more teeth than you’re used to seeing in a classic horror image, and coupled with its colorful look, it feels surprisingly contemporary. .

The plot involves a nosy alcoholic reporter played by Lee Tracy investigating a series of “full moon murders” committed by a serial killer who witnesses say is a disfigured monster. These murders appear to involve the killer cannibalizing the victims, as detailed in an autopsy scene. It is about prostitution, rape, drug addiction and a final scene before the credits featuring a “joy buzzer” that can only really be interpreted in a lascivious way.

There is one particular scene where we are introduced to blindfolded Dr. Rowitz (Arthur Edmund Carewe) with his white blouse spotted with red blood. This was probably the first time audiences had been exposed to colored blood, decades before Hammer Studios made a mint by pouring drops of bright red paint all over the screen in their films “Frankenstein” and ” Dracula ”by Christopher Lee / Peter Cushing.

“Mystery of the Wax Museum” is also loaded with innuendo and “offensive” material, including Fay Wray posing suggestively in a scene where she is chatting on the phone. His roommate is a hangover reporter named Florence played by the hilarious Glenda Farrell, who at one point in the movie walks up to a cop and asks him bluntly, “How’s your sex life?” One of the main characters is a drug addict (we see him doing drugs in the shadows at one point) whom the cops let dry until he finally agrees to confess to a crime, revealing dark circles on his eyes. .


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