Fine Art Investment – Bing Gallery http://binggallery.com/ Thu, 10 Jun 2021 14:25:19 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.7.2 https://binggallery.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/default-150x150.png Fine Art Investment – Bing Gallery http://binggallery.com/ 32 32 The best passion investments to emerge in 2021 https://binggallery.com/the-best-passion-investments-to-emerge-in-2021/ Thu, 10 Jun 2021 13:02:08 +0000 https://binggallery.com/the-best-passion-investments-to-emerge-in-2021/ Over the past year, Arbuthnot Latham has observed a greater convergence between leisure and investing. Global Wealth reported that even during this pandemic, investors continued to generate value for major collectible assets. Passionate investing is very often just a hobby rather than part of a larger financial planning strategy. Exponential technological changes and a huge […]]]>


Over the past year, Arbuthnot Latham has observed a greater convergence between leisure and investing.

Global Wealth reported that even during this pandemic, investors continued to generate value for major collectible assets.

Passionate investing is very often just a hobby rather than part of a larger financial planning strategy. Exponential technological changes and a huge increase in the number of retail investors have constantly created volatility and unpredictability in new asset classes.

What is certain is that the lines between investments of passion and investments of pure purpose have blurred. So what exactly were people interested in:

Non-fungible tokens (NFT)

According to the market tracker, 134,191 sales took place in March 2021, with collectors spending more than US $ 200 million to exchange works of art, gifs and memes.

The platform allows an artist to launch his career and be paid for his work.

NFTs have caught the attention of many companies willing to push the boundaries and unlock the potential, from cryptocurrency for entertainment and sports, to exploiting the collectibles market for football fans, or even virtual real estate, with a digital home selling as much as in the United States. $ 500,000 recently.

Toys

An unopened and forgotten copy of Super Mario Bros. for the Nintendo Entertainment System – a 198 Christmas present – was auctioned for US $ 660,000 last month. The giveaway remained closed for 35 years.

Pokémon collectible cards gained tremendous popularity during the Covid-19 pandemic. A rare first edition ‘Charizard’ card sold for $ 360,000.

Forbes reported that for some less unique cards, the sale rate can vary between US $ 400 and US $ 2,000.

Star Wars collectibles have also caught the attention of many. In 2019, a Star Wars prototype “Bib Fortuna” toy sold for £ 36,000 alongside other characters, all of whom are said to be “relatively unknown”.

Books

Well-preserved, original and limited edition items have sold at auction for hundreds of thousands of pounds, and in some cases millions.

Indeed, the first comic book featuring Superman sold on eBay for over $ 3.25 million. The original was on sale for 10 cents in 1938.

The Harry Potter books also prove to be a one-time investment, but there is a catch. Only 500 copies of the first edition were originally printed, and it didn’t take long for a spelling error to be spotted in the book.

In 2020 one of these copies, released in 1997, surpassed the original value of £ 30,000 and sold for £ 60,000.

Vintage Baseball Cards

Mint cards sold in the US StockX market soared in average price in 2020 from US $ 280 to US $ 775 per card.

Last month, Tom Brady, one of 100 One-of-a-Kind Athlete Cards, sold for $ 1.3 million.

Jewelry

Colored diamonds have been considered the safest bet for ROI. The biggest coin ever to be auctioned, a 14.8-carat rose-purple diamond, sold for £ 20.1million in 2020 in Switzerland, showing that the market has remained strong despite the pandemic.

Trainers

Trainers have also earned their place as an investment category. In England, the Kayne West x Louis Vuitton sneaker collection is valued at £ 22,763 as the most valuable.

If you own a pair, we hope you have chosen gray and pink as they are the most sought after. In the United States, a pair of sneakers in the style of the famous Nike dunks sold in March for the equivalent of £ 24,000.

Nick Gornall, Business Development Manager at Arbuthnot Latham, said: “Traditionally, passion investments would have included fine and contemporary art, wine, watches, classic jewelry and super cars, which would suggest a level knowledge and major issues around authenticity, storage, taxes and insurance.

“In a world that has seen historically low interest rates after 2008, and with the globalization of investors, especially China who access via technology, there is renewed interest and more transparent market platforms for such passionate investments.

“It’s no surprise to see many other emerging trends – what price will be paid 30 years from now for the prototype electric car or the digital footprint for today’s Instagram influencer, I wonder. let’s live in interesting times. “



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Homeworld 3 bin investment plan https://binggallery.com/homeworld-3-bin-investment-plan/ Wed, 09 Jun 2021 16:50:26 +0000 https://binggallery.com/homeworld-3-bin-investment-plan/ When Homeworld 3 launched a token crowdfunding campaign in 2019, it was through a site that not only allows people to donate money, but also invest in the game and get paid if it works. good. Well, here we go. As development continues, the investment aspect has been phased out, possibly following the takeover of […]]]>


When Homeworld 3 launched a token crowdfunding campaign in 2019, it was through a site that not only allows people to donate money, but also invest in the game and get paid if it works. good. Well, here we go. As development continues, the investment aspect has been phased out, possibly following the takeover of Gearbox, owner of Homeworld, by the ever-growing Embracer group. But Homeworld 3 is still on. So it’s good.

A potential investor shared the email he received from Fig on Reddit. The post states that “there have been recent changes at Gearbox” and because of this Fig canceled the investment bookings. No one actually paid to invest, everything was still on hold. The email also makes it clear that the game and donor rewards still get to the people who paid them, they just give up on the whole investment.

Gearbox was recently purchased in April by Embracer Group, the giant studio and publisher network that includes Deep Silver, THQ Nordic, and dozens more.

Fig CEO Justin Bailey told GamesIndustry.biz that the Homeworld 3 campaign has yet to reach the point of reaching out to people who have signed up to invest and close the deal. Bailey said Fig was in talks with Gearbox to launch this, but these “failed after the acquisition was announced.”

Fig never sat down with me as a crowdfunding platform. It’s weird and rude to say ‘Hey fans, come give us some money to potentially make a game and we’ll give you a t-shirt’ and ‘Hey investors, come give us some money to potentially make a game. game and we could give you money ‘on the same page. Especially when Homeworld 3’s goal was a token sum of $ 1 to see how much they can raise, not to determine if the gamble has been made or not. I’m okay with crowdfunding and okay with investing, but the two side by side hurt me.

Concept art for a frozen encounter.

I would love to see something from Homeworld 3 on Gearbox’s E3 Showcase stream on Saturday. No idea if they will show it, watch out. Check out our E3 2021 schedule for more on everything. In the meantime, the developers have released illustrations and pieces in updates to Fig.

Homeworld 3 developers Blackbird Interactive also worked on Hardspace: Shipbreaker, a first-person working simulation about cutting up spaceships for scrap metal. That’s great, even in Early Access. Sin (RPS at Peace) celebrated the little details, and Alex Wiltshire also spoke with the design developers behind the cut.



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The fictional fabric of Frans van Mieris https://binggallery.com/the-fictional-fabric-of-frans-van-mieris/ Tue, 08 Jun 2021 20:23:21 +0000 https://binggallery.com/the-fictional-fabric-of-frans-van-mieris/ Artist Zeuxis painted grapes so realistic that birds pecked at them. This was according to a popular Roman account of a legendary painting competition from ancient Greece. To overtake Zeuxis’ work, artist Parrhasius painted an even more realistic curtain, and when Zeuxis saw it, he tried to push it aside. Zeuxis yielded that Parrhasius’ skill […]]]>


Artist Zeuxis painted grapes so realistic that birds pecked at them.

This was according to a popular Roman account of a legendary painting competition from ancient Greece. To overtake Zeuxis’ work, artist Parrhasius painted an even more realistic curtain, and when Zeuxis saw it, he tried to push it aside. Zeuxis yielded that Parrhasius’ skill was superior: Zeuxis only fooled birds, but Parrhasius was fooling a human – and an artist besides.

The competition of artistic traditions inspired two Dutch artists, but they added a fascinating touch of the 17th century. In a rare collaboration, Adriaen van der Spelt, specializing in still life flower paintings, and Frans van Mieris, famous for his exceptional depictions of fabric in scenes from everyday life, demonstrated their skills on a panel.

Adriaen van der Spelled and Frans van Mieris

The first time I saw Trompe l’Oeil Still life with flower garland and curtain at the Art Institute, I was drawn to the curtain: the sheen and texture of the fabric deeply appealed to my sense of touch, as if I could grip the cool, soft folds between my thumb and forefinger (although I have not tried). Upon closer inspection, I was dazzled by the flat layers of paint that my mind turned into silk fabric. The curtain seemed so obviously present.

Nicolas Maes. Harold Samuel Collection, Mansion House, Guildhall Art Gallery, City of London, 3737

Van Mieris’ illusionist curtain is a motif that also appears in Earphone by Nicholaes Maes, the pupil of Rembrandt van Rijn, and simulates the scale and fabric of curtains used to protect prized paintings from 17th century collections. In these two trompe-l’oeil paintings (a term which literally means “to deceive the eye”), the artists demonstrated their skill to their peers while competing for the attention of collectors and patrons.

Unlike Maes’ interior scene of everyday life, the perspective of which recedes into a deep illusory space, almost like looking through a window, the subject of Jan Davidsz de Heem Fruit and Flower Garland seems to extend into the viewer’s space, beyond the shallow stone arch which is flush with the plane of the image. Van der Spelt’s garland extends the same way in our space, but the Van Mieris curtain interrupts the illusion.

The combination of a still life flower garland and an illusionistic curtain was rare. To compete with the seemingly real appearance of Van der Spelt’s garland, Van Mieris needed a thorough understanding of the qualities of fabric and the dexterity to mimic those qualities in painting on a two-dimensional surface. In Foundations of the Noble and Free Art of Painting (1604), the first treatise on the ideals of art in the Netherlands, Karel van Mander devotes a chapter to drapery and fabric. Van Mander encourages the study of the movements, folds and folds of life so that “as the branches grow from a tree … the folds develop from each other” in an artist’s work.

In addition, for “sparkling” fabrics such as silk, the color of the reflections must match the neighboring colors. To represent convincing draperies and differentiating textures such as fur, velvet and silk, as Van Mieris does in Young woman feeding a parrot was considered a difficult test of artistic ability due to the different ways in which these fabrics reflect light.

Frans van Mieris. Image courtesy of The Leiden Collection, New York

Silk fibers are highly reflective and when woven together the effect is like millions of tiny mirrors that create diffuse reflections in the folds and folds of the fabric. To recreate the look of a three-dimensional silk curtain, Van Mieris used a fine brush and a wide range of color tones to create a dramatic contrast between the brightest highlights and the medium blue tone. The contrast is sharp in the vertical folds of the curtain and in the fine details of the three crisp horizontal folds.

Adriaen van der Spell

Use our zoom feature to examine the details, including the folds between the gold threads of the embroidered edge.

What is clear is that Van Mieris was invested in the sensual material and artistic qualities of the silk fabric, and this investment reinforced the successful illusionism of his work. More than 360 years after being painted, the curtain could still fool this expert viewer. And that’s a good thing too, because my fascination with her kept me from trying to lean closer to smell the flowers.

—Sandra Racek, Chicago Objects Initiative Fellow Andrew W. Mellon 2020-2021

The subjects

  • Collection
  • Artists
  • Perspectives



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Meeting the demand for cannabis: it’s all about licensing https://binggallery.com/meeting-the-demand-for-cannabis-its-all-about-licensing/ Mon, 07 Jun 2021 19:48:00 +0000 https://binggallery.com/meeting-the-demand-for-cannabis-its-all-about-licensing/ As cannabis legalization sweeps across the United States, companies in the industry quickly realize they have a major problem; they cannot meet all the demand. One of the main causes of this supply chain problem is the license required to operate every step of the way. Without the proper license, the producer cannot extract their […]]]>


As cannabis legalization sweeps across the United States, companies in the industry quickly realize they have a major problem; they cannot meet all the demand. One of the main causes of this supply chain problem is the license required to operate every step of the way.

Without the proper license, the producer cannot extract their cannabis in concentrated oils to go into vape cartridges, the vape extractor and filler cannot distribute their product to dispensaries, and dispensaries cannot do anything. ‘other than buying cannabis products directly from one of the authorized distributors.

The only way to grow without relying entirely on third-party vendors is to get every licensing element across the entire supply chain. While this is an expensive, difficult, and time consuming process, this is exactly what is needed to survive and thrive in the long term in cannabis, and that is exactly what Vertical Companies have spent the last 5 years. years to go.

Vertical Companies was founded with the belief and understanding that to be successful in cannabis for the long term, you need to be in control of your supply chain. No matter how popular your stores, brands or products are, if you haven’t configured the supply chain to grow with demand, you’re doomed from the start.

If you would like to receive information on investing with vertical companies, please click here.

In 2019, the vertical companies completed their $ 63 million fundraiser, which allowed them to complete construction and start growing from their state-of-the-art 100% indoor growing and manufacturing facility. of technology in Needles, California. Spread over 7 acres with an additional 22 acres zoned and approved for cannabis use, the Vertical’s Needles facility is one of the largest indoor cannabis facilities in California and produces a crop of hundreds of pounds each week.

And since the facility is 100% indoors, the cannabis grown is of the highest quality possible. By growing cannabis completely indoors in a controlled environment, Vertical can fine-tune every aspect of the growing process to be exactly what each plant needs. Hundreds of high-tech sensors monitoring the 34 grow rooms regulate plant nutrients, water and light schedules 24/7 to ensure they are growing to their full potential . A costly initial investment, but something that will allow the business to continue to grow without any bottlenecks coming from the heart of any cannabis business, growth.

As Vertical continues to attract even more demand for its cannabis than it already has, smart and strategic planning when setting up the business will prove to be one of the main separators between them and them. competitors who are struggling to keep pace.

If you would like to receive information on investing with vertical companies, please click here.



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The growth of the art sector in New Zealand, a silver lining of the pandemic https://binggallery.com/the-growth-of-the-art-sector-in-new-zealand-a-silver-lining-of-the-pandemic/ Sun, 06 Jun 2021 17:00:00 +0000 https://binggallery.com/the-growth-of-the-art-sector-in-new-zealand-a-silver-lining-of-the-pandemic/ NOTICE: The past 18 months have shown the value of the arts. With international travel limited, we relied on books, screens, music, theater and galleries to transport us to new places. On the more mercantilist level, where I tend to focus in this column, the arts have also proven to be a convenient way to […]]]>


NOTICE: The past 18 months have shown the value of the arts. With international travel limited, we relied on books, screens, music, theater and galleries to transport us to new places.

On the more mercantilist level, where I tend to focus in this column, the arts have also proven to be a convenient way to store wealth for those who would otherwise have spent money on luxury travel. In New Zealand, galleries and auction houses have reported increased sales; a work by street artist Banksy sold for $ 1.45 million in Auckland in March.

While that seems like a big sum to many New Zealanders, especially those struggling to enter the housing market, it is still peanuts internationally.

Live events have become big business for auction houses in 2020 – and Asia has played a big role in international sales.

READ MORE:
* ‘Disaster Girl’ meme sold as NFT for over $ 650,000
* Art market has skyrocketed since Covid-19 lockdown – experts
* Banksy’s rare art is auctioned off to a New Zealand bidder for $ 1.45 million in a big night for the Auckland gallery
* Paintings rack up $ 3.3 million at Auckland art auction

A triptych by British artist Francis Bacon tops the list of the most expensive works of art, at $ 84.5 million. It was sold by Sotheby’s in a digital streaming auction in June and drew a bidding duel between an online bidder in China and an opponent by telephone in New York, who ultimately won.

Three Chinese works were among the top 10 most expensive works of art sold internationally last year. In October, Poly Auction sold a Ming Dynasty hand scroll by landscape painter Wu Bin in Beijing for around US $ 77 million, taking second place. Another classic scroll fetched $ 41.8 million at a Sotheby’s auction in Hong Kong, and a 1950s work by the late Sino-French modernist painter Sanyu (recently described as a market sensation), sold $ 33.3 million.

For several centuries, wealthy collectors (and museums) in the West have purchased Asian antiques, such as porcelain, fabrics, paintings, and furniture.

Executive Director of the Asia New Zealand Foundation, Simon Draper.

PROVIDED

Executive Director of the Asia New Zealand Foundation, Simon Draper.

But this image is changing rapidly, with Asian buyers playing an increasingly important role in the international market. China has a growing number of billionaires – Forbes had 626 in 2020, up from 388 the year before (equivalent to a new billionaire every 36 hours in China last year). And like their counterparts around the world, the wealthy Chinese love to buy art, which stimulates both the domestic and international art market.

China is also busy building new museums, which will further stimulate demand for art. Chinese media agency Xinhua reported that on average, a new museum was opened every two days in China between 2016 and 2020.

Several Asian cities have actively invested in strategies to become the artistic hubs of Asia. Hong Kong has positioned itself as an entry point to the mainland and has served as a base in Asia for auction houses and international fairs. By reallocating some of the land at the infamous Hong Kong Airport to Kowloon (which closed in 1998), his government has invested nearly HK $ 21.6 billion (NZ $ 4 billion) in the district. culture of West Kowloon. With 17 cultural venues planned, its centerpiece is the giant M + museum, which is scheduled to open at the end of the year. Despite this investment, there is a feeling that Hong Kong has lost some of its international appeal due to concerns about mainland China’s potential to hamper freedom of artistic expression.

The Singapore government has also invested in its arts sector, seeing its status as a hub as a key opportunity for the island nation, both for generating income and for employment. In addition to economic gain, the Singapore government also views the arts as a means of increasing social cohesion and bridging the “inequality” divide.

South Korea recently claimed more of its hub status with the announcement of the launch of Frieze, an international contemporary art fair, in Seoul in 2022, becoming Asia’s first Frieze fair.

So just as countries compete for leadership in technology, infrastructure or many other industries, the arts are a competitive sector in Asia.

Asia also plays an important role in today’s non-fungible token (NFT) market. In March, Christie’s sold a digital artwork by Beeple to Vignesh Sundaresan, aka “Metakovan,” a Singapore-based blockchain entrepreneur for US $ 69.3 million (NZ $ 97 million). He won by outbidding entrepreneur Justin Sun, founder of Chinese cryptocurrency platform TRON, in the last 20 seconds of the auction.

This digital collage from Beeple sold for $ 69.3 million.  An unprecedented sale of a digital artwork that brought in more money than the physical works of many better-known artists.

Beeple / Christie’s via AP

This digital collage from Beeple sold for $ 69.3 million. An unprecedented sale of a digital artwork that brought in more money than the physical works of many better-known artists.

In a statement with his business partner Anand Venkateswaran, Sundaresan said the purchase was intended to be an anti-racist statement: and the Rest, and that the Global South is rising.

For years, the Asia New Foundation has helped New Zealand artists discover Asia, in order to explain and demystify the region to New Zealand audiences. And we have welcomed many artists from Asia, a wide range of countries and creative practices.

The role of the arts in communicating across borders and cultures, and in thinking and leading change in society, will only grow. New Zealand’s creative sectors will increasingly find themselves working in Asia and with Asia.

The New Zealand arts sector has the opportunity to profit from being part of the fastest growing art market in the world. They will help tell New Zealand’s story to Asia and in doing so will benefit not only themselves, but all of New Zealand.

Simon Draper is the Executive Director of the Asia-New Zealand Te Whītau Tūhono Foundation.



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How to choose the best prints for your home https://binggallery.com/how-to-choose-the-best-prints-for-your-home/ Sat, 05 Jun 2021 05:00:25 +0000 https://binggallery.com/how-to-choose-the-best-prints-for-your-home/ I was introduced to printing when I was a student in a part-time job with my old friend, then an art student, now a print artist, studio technician and mentor. Michael Timmins. His first descriptions of printing techniques have since aroused a fascination with the medium. This year, I bought more artwork than before. Have […]]]>


I was introduced to printing when I was a student in a part-time job with my old friend, then an art student, now a print artist, studio technician and mentor. Michael Timmins. His first descriptions of printing techniques have since aroused a fascination with the medium. This year, I bought more artwork than before. Have I spent a fortune? No. Am I an art connoisseur? Far from there.

I think print is an affordable and accessible way to bring personality to your home, whatever your taste or budget, but where do you start? Galleries have started to reopen, but if you can’t access them there are plenty of great places to buy prints online – check out SO Fine Art, Hang Tough Studio, Stoney Road Press, Jam Art Prints and more. others across the country.

Charity events can also be a great place to shop for art, as evidenced by the success of the IDI Grand Prix winner Creatives Against Covid project last year.

The work of Cork-based artist Deirdre Breen is available through SO Fine Art Editions, Atelier Maser and Damn Fine Print. Breen agrees that there are misconceptions surrounding printing.

“There are assumptions that the prints are copies or posters, when most of the time they are in fact separate works made by the artist. They are their own medium, and not always a reproduction of a painting, ”Breen explains.

“There are many forms of printmaking, but all of them essentially involve the transfer of an image from one physical flat surface to another surface such as paper or wood,” Breen explains.

“Once an artist is satisfied with the image and the artwork, he completes an” artist proof “which is a print of a print taken to assess the current print condition of the artist. ‘a plate or screen and a way to verify that the color and quality of the limited edition is what it should be. Often the artist will keep this print for his own records and label it “A / P “.

Engraving techniques

For the uninitiated, the small numbers in the corner of a print represent the number of the work of art in a limited edition. The first work of a limited number of 100 will be marked 1/100, however the quality is the same whether you buy number one or 100 in this edition.

“The artist will sign each individual print to authenticate the artwork as a work,” Deirdre continues. “With open editions a number of prints can be created and the amount sold is unlimited. It is good to check if the artwork is limited or an open edition before purchasing a print, as the limited edition will be more valuable.

Some works charge higher prices than others.

“The price of a print is often based on the engraving technique, the complexity of the way it was made, the quality of the work and the notoriety of the artist,” Breen explains. “Traditional techniques requiring a hands-on approach such as lithographs, monotypes and screen prints can cost more than giclées or digital prints.”

Assemble 1 by Deirdre Breen, available at SO Fine Art Editions, Atelier Maser and Damn Fine Print

Assemble 1 by Deirdre Breen, available at SO Fine Art Editions, Atelier Maser and Damn Fine Print

Peter Brennan is Director of the Graphic Studio Gallery at Temple Bar, Dublin. The gallery has an excellent online store with over 1,000 original works of art by artists such as Jean Bardon, Mark Francis and Kate MacDonagh, organized into categories such as Landscape, Human Form and Animalia.

“While traditional printmaking can be a long and labor-intensive process, the fact that prints are produced in limited collections means that many works are affordable, but there are none. compromise in terms of quality, ”explains Brennan. “As the plates can be inked and reused, a number of images can be produced, each of which is an original work by the artist.”

Brennan says most of the gallery’s clients buy pieces because they love them rather than for their investment potential.

“Most people don’t spend a fortune, so it’s a lot less stressful and more enjoyable. It’s less about buying trophies than buying with the heart, ”he says. “The only statement you make is a statement of taste rather than wealth. That said, the print medium means that it is possible to get an incredible original work of art, by a remarkable artist, for relatively little.

Putting your heart into art was one of the reasons co-founders Rosie Gogan-Keogh, Greg Spring and Russell Simmons created Hen’s Teeth in 2015. Formerly on Fade Street in the capital, Hen’s Teeth has become a destination shrine in Blackpitts, Dublin. 8 for its well edited art, objects, lifestyle and food collection.

“My love of art grew out of the energy of Keith Haring’s work,” says Spring, Creative Director of Hen’s Teeth. “The first piece I commissioned in 2014 was by Denise Nestor, by late hip-hop artist J Dilla. J Dilla’s estate contacted us and then used the image on the cover of an LP posthumously.

Choose the right part

When it comes to choosing a piece of art for your home, Gogan-Keogh recommends buying what makes you happy.

“There’s a good chance your taste will change over time, so a good place to start is’ does this make me smile? “”

While many of us want instant gratification, she cautions against all-in-one purchases.

Hold Face by David Vanadia, at Hen's Teeth

Hold Face by David Vanadia, at Hen’s Teeth

“Your home should reflect who you are, and prints are the perfect way to inject that. Create a collection that’s unique to you and hang pieces that evoke memories while looking great on your wall, ”she says.

“Don’t be afraid to combine styles, genres and types of frames – graphic, illustrative or photographic prints from different eras can look amazing together.”

One of the shop’s patrons, Oliver Cruise, runs the Network Cafe in Dublin and is a co-founder of the visual resume app Pineapple.

“The graphic and colorful style of many of Hen’s Teeth works appeal to me, and Andy Welland’s works added a bit of vibrancy to what was an otherwise drab room during the lockdown,” he says. “I have Jacob Burrill’s Clarity, Opportunity and Imagination prints for inspiration in my home office. I know I can get a really nice framed piece in Hen’s Teeth for around $ 100.

It is this democratic approach to art that appeals to Greg Spring. “I remember listening to Sarah Andelman, founder of Colette in Paris, talk about how her customers ranged from 18 years old buying sneakers to 70 years old buying candles,” he says. “We recently asked three teenagers to buy their first prints with us. They really took a hit. You don’t have to buy an artwork for $ 4,000 – you can buy a print for as little as $ 30.

Collector: Shaun Davin

Although he has no training in art, Shaun Davin has been buying prints since 2005. His collection includes print editions of Damien Hirst, Conor Harrington, James Earley, Mary O’Connor, MASER, Cyclle, Joram Roukes and Kaws. Davin believes printing is an affordable way to start your art collection.

“I first became interested in the art collection after seeing a documentary on Charles Saatchi in the early 1990s. His collection of Damien Hirsts was quite convincing. Against the backdrop of Hirst’s spot and spin paintings, medicine cabinets and monochromes of butterflies, this new era of contemporary art by the Young British Artists caught my eye and I’ve been fascinated by art ever since.

Daisy 11 by Marylou Faure at Hen's Teeth

Daisy 11 by Marylou Faure at Hen’s Teeth

The handmade aspect of fine art prints attracts me: the accumulation of inks, how they sit on the paper and how each can have its own brightness and vibrancy. I love the scope of a print edition. An artist or publisher can place editions in galleries around the world and participate in multiple print exhibitions at one time.

Some of my favorite Irish artists are ACHES, Colm Mac Athlaoich, Shane O’Driscoll, Chloe Early, Aoife Scott, Neil Dunne, Ted Pim and Richard Gorman. I would like to see these artists recognized in a much broader dialogue of contemporary art.

The different types of prints in my collection have been a great topic of conversation over the years. Being able to present an artist or a work to people is an exciting part of collecting art and hopefully inspires others to collect too.

My list of dream pieces is endless, but at the top of that list is Francis Bacon, Study for a Bullfight No. 1. Lithograph (1971). Edition of 150. Published by Musée du Grand Palais, Paris.

graphicstudiodublin.com
hensteethstore.com
Instagram: @shaundavin @deirdrebreen



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Clarke County couple create fine arts foundation | Winchester Star https://binggallery.com/clarke-county-couple-create-fine-arts-foundation-winchester-star/ Sat, 05 Jun 2021 04:00:00 +0000 https://binggallery.com/clarke-county-couple-create-fine-arts-foundation-winchester-star/ MILLWOOD – People have different ways of relaxing. Some read books or watch television. Others take pleasure in looking at beautiful things. John Staelin and his wife, Clarke County jewelry designer Elizabeth Locke, are among the latter group. Because this is a subjective question, it is difficult for Staelin to describe why they enjoy seeing […]]]>


MILLWOOD – People have different ways of relaxing. Some read books or watch television. Others take pleasure in looking at beautiful things.

John Staelin and his wife, Clarke County jewelry designer Elizabeth Locke, are among the latter group. Because this is a subjective question, it is difficult for Staelin to describe why they enjoy seeing decorative items and learning how they are made.

“We just find them visually appealing,” he said. “I can’t explain why.”

To help others share their interest, the couple created a large endowment at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts (VMFA) in Richmond. Staelin declined to specify the amount of the endowment.

The endowment is called Elizabeth Locke, associate curator of the American Decorative Arts Fund. Susan J. Rawles, currently Associate Curator of the Museum of American Painting and Decorative Art, will fill the position.

Staelin and Locke contributed to the Change Capital Campaign, in which the museum implemented its strategic plan, and provided financial support for several exhibitions. In addition, Locke’s jewelry design firm, Elizabeth Locke Jewels, was the presenting sponsor of the exhibition “The Rachel Lambert Mellon Collection of Jean Schlumberger at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts”.

In a press release, Alex Nyerges, director and chief executive of the museum, said the couple have long been a private supporter of the museum, which receives state funding. The endowment was their biggest gift to VMFA to date, Nyerges said, describing it as “a major investment in the museum’s decorative arts department.”

Decorative arts range from furniture, jewelry and clocks to African masks, Faberge eggs and micromosaics, Staelin said.

Micromosaics are small figurative images created from tiny materials similar to enamel or glass fragments called tesserae, websites relating to the art exhibition.

A VMFA staff member for over 25 years, Rawles specializes in material culture from the mid-17th century to the early 19th century. She writes and lectures on topics ranging from colonial artistic portraits to period interiors, according to her biography on the museum’s website.

In 2019, Rawles worked with Locke to organize an exhibition focusing on Locke’s extensive personal collection of micromosaics, titled “A Return to the Grand Tour: Micromosaic Jewels from the Collection of Elizabeth Locke,” as well as an accompanying catalog. .

“I am incredibly grateful to Elizabeth and John for making this gift and honored to assume this new title,” Rawles said in a statement. “They have been strong supporters of VMFA and our mutual appreciation of the decorative arts has strengthened the museum’s historic commitment to the study and demonstration of superior craftsmanship.”

The museum “does a great job around the state,” Staelin said, explaining why he and Locke are supporting him. He mentioned that he provided exhibits for other institutions, including the Shenandoah Valley Museum in Winchester.

“Unfortunately … it’s two hours” from the zone, he said of VMFA. “But it’s worth the detour. “

Staelin served as the Millwood District Representative on the Clarke County Board of Directors for 18 years and is currently the CFO of his wife’s business. Director of the VMFA from 2005 to 2013, he joined the board of directors of the museum’s private foundation in 2014.

Along with the museum, Locke and Staelin are heavily involved in Save Venice, an American nonprofit organization that works to preserve the art and culture of Venice, Italy. In addition, Locke is a member of the board of directors of The Garden Conservancy, a New York State-based organization that promotes gardening and associated traditions across the country.

Staelin encourages people to appreciate the arts – not only to look at works, but also to discover the ideas and techniques that went into creating them – as a hobby.

“You always want to broaden your horizons, to look at the world through different eyes,” he said.



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Kiwis’ love affair with art continues after confinement https://binggallery.com/kiwis-love-affair-with-art-continues-after-confinement/ Fri, 04 Jun 2021 17:00:00 +0000 https://binggallery.com/kiwis-love-affair-with-art-continues-after-confinement/ The Covid-19 has prompted many Kiwis to rediscover the love of art. Sales were strong at Wellington’s NZ Art Show this weekend, and the Auckland Art Fair in February broke sales records. There was “no doubt” that people were showing more interest since the lockdown, said Carla Russell, executive director of the Wellington show. The […]]]>


The Covid-19 has prompted many Kiwis to rediscover the love of art.

Sales were strong at Wellington’s NZ Art Show this weekend, and the Auckland Art Fair in February broke sales records.

There was “no doubt” that people were showing more interest since the lockdown, said Carla Russell, executive director of the Wellington show.

The show’s opening night on Thursday was the most successful in its 18-year history.

READ MORE:
* Covid-19: Increase in art sales as New Zealanders stay at home
* Sharing Your Paintings: Creative Ways to Buy Art on a Budget
* Lockdown blues sparks surge in art sales

“We sold our tickets about two months ago, and we probably could have sold them 10 times as much.”

Stephanie Post, who co-directed the Auckland Art Fair in February, said a record $ 10 million worth of artwork has been sold. Revenue has grown every year since reaching $ 5 million in 2015.

THE DETAIL / RNZ

Some of the projects that received the grant have been criticized a bit for their unusual proposals, the Detail is for the artists who received the grant and Creative NZ CEO Stephen Wainwright, who advocates for their approach to supporting the arts. (Video first published in October 2020).

Both events were canceled last year due to Covid-19, and Post said she felt “exceptionally lucky” to host one of the only live art exhibitions in the world since March of l ‘last year.

However, even this year’s Auckland Fair had its moments, with the city returning to Alert Level 3 on the last day of the fair. The number of visitors has increased from 10,000 to 7,000 regulars.

Post said all types of work have proven to be popular, from paintings, photographs and sculptures to an increasing number of video works.

Auckland artist Rachel Rush says the sales have been “amazing”.

Provided

Auckland artist Rachel Rush says the sales have been “amazing”.

The art galleries had also been “largely good”. “People who couldn’t travel spent some of their money on art, but what [artists] miss is the art fair, because when you don’t have an art fair in a year, that’s a big part of your sales.

Auckland resin and graffiti artist Rachel Rush said she thought she was in “big trouble” when most art exhibits went online because her works were better viewed in person.

Even so, the sales had been “incredible”.

Like others, Rush felt there was more than one reason for the insanity, including people spending more time at home and valuing the local culture as well.

“It seems that people appreciate art more… There seem to be a lot of people with more money, and also people a lot more supportive.”

Bern art dealer and gallery owner Dan of Sumer Gallery in Tauranga agreed that artists benefit from people’s lack of ability to travel, but there was also a growing curiosity about art as a ‘investment.

Dan from Bern said that an online art sale he organized in New Zealand was

Provided

Dan from Bern said that an online art sale he organized in New Zealand was “a blind eye”.

The real estate boom and the cost of cheap money made some people feel richer, “and I think that’s a big part of our market.”

But there were also others who were resigned to not owning a home and spending on important assets instead.

“There are so many people who are new to collecting art. Until about a year ago, most of our clients were Baby Boomers, Young Baby Boomers but Baby Boomers or Older Gen Xers.

“Now we’re seeing millennials coming in and even Gen Z people buying or thinking about art. And that’s encouraging.

He also had a virtual art sale in New Zealand and Australia and although they involved different artists, “the virtual art fair in New Zealand was a bit more blind” compared to the Australian.

In fact, he believed the market had rarely seen better times since a buying explosion in the early 2000s and its peak in the 1980s before the stock market crash.

Increasingly, however, buyers were starting to talk about art as an investment rather than just for their walls.

“A few years ago, if you had even said those words, people would cringe. I remember people at the art fair, one couple in particular, saying: Is this going to be a good investment? And I would say, by what metric? I think this is a question for you to resolve on your own.

Buying art for love or for investment is an age-old question for the industry.

Post said purchasing a gallery-curated artwork gives an indication of whether a artwork has investment potential.

“But you have to buy art because you like it, not because you want to make money from it. It’s hard to do.



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Global Programmable Stage Lighting Market Industry Trends 2020 – Martin, ACME, Chauvet, Color Kinetics (Philips) – The Courier https://binggallery.com/global-programmable-stage-lighting-market-industry-trends-2020-martin-acme-chauvet-color-kinetics-philips-the-courier/ Thu, 03 Jun 2021 13:18:20 +0000 https://binggallery.com/global-programmable-stage-lighting-market-industry-trends-2020-martin-acme-chauvet-color-kinetics-philips-the-courier/ Global Programmable Stage Lighting Market 2020 by Manufacturers, Type and Application, Forecast to 2025 presented by a leading market research firm MarketsandResearch.biz presents itself as a very reliable source of information and data on the global market. The report is a multipurpose and future-ready analytical survey that contains trend assessment, in-depth assessment of market assessment […]]]>


Global Programmable Stage Lighting Market 2020 by Manufacturers, Type and Application, Forecast to 2025 presented by a leading market research firm MarketsandResearch.biz presents itself as a very reliable source of information and data on the global market. The report is a multipurpose and future-ready analytical survey that contains trend assessment, in-depth assessment of market assessment and income generating trends. The report covers accurate information on current and upcoming trends and developments in the global programmable stage lighting market. It comprehensively reviews several market factors such as vital segments, regional market condition, market dynamics, suitability of investments, and major players operating in the market.

The report then presents a detailed analysis based on in-depth research of the overall market, particularly questions that cover the market size, growth scenario, potential opportunities, operational landscape, trend analysis, and analysis. competitive. The report provides a clear understanding of the current and future status of the Global Programmable Stage Lighting Market based on revenue, volume, production, trends, technology, innovation, and other critical factors. The research sheds light on the latest market information, analysis of the current situation with upcoming trends and the breakdown of products and services.

NOTE: Our report highlights the main issues and dangers that businesses could face as a result of the unprecedented COVID-19 outbreak.

DOWNLOAD A SAMPLE FREE REPORT: https://www.marketsandresearch.biz/sample-request/98844

The forecast market view will be useful for new business, development trends, and investment feasibility analysis. It also studies growth trends, revenue, import-export scenario, production volume and market value. It offers the fundamental outlook on high growth markets, business economics as well as industry variations in business factors. The study provides an in-depth analysis of the overall market structure along with the forecast of the various segments and sub-segments of the global Programmable Stage Lighting Market.

The following main key players are covered:

Martin, ACME, Chauvet, Color Kinetics (Philips), Vari-Lite (Philips), LumenPulse, ADJ, Clay Paky (Osram), ROBE, SGM Lighting, Acclaim Lighting, Golden Sea, Traxon (Osram), Yajiang Photoelectric, GVA lighting , High-end systems, PR Light, Visage, Altman Lighting, GTD Lighting, FINE ART, Robert juliat, Elation

By Product Types, the market is segmented into:

LED, Halogen, Discharge

By Application, the market is segmented into:

Architecture, Entertainment, Concert / Tour, Others

Geographic analysis covered in the market report:

The latest business intelligence report analyzes the global programmable stage lighting market in terms of market scope and consumer bases in key geographies of the market. This section of the report accurately assesses the market presence in major regions. It determines the market share, market size, revenue contribution, sales network and distribution channels of each regional segment.

On the basis of geography, the global programmable stage lighting market can be categorized into:

North America (United States, Canada and Mexico), Europe (Germany, France, United Kingdom, Russia and Italy), Asia-Pacific (China, Japan, Korea, India and Southeast Asia), South America (Brazil, Argentina, etc.), Middle East and Africa (Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Nigeria and South Africa)

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Key questions addressed in the report:

  • What has been the development performance of regional markets in recent years?
  • What are the major characteristics of the products attracting high consumer demand in the global Programmable Stage Lighting Market?
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  • Which application should secure a significant share of the market?
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Various factors that may drive the growth of the Global Programmable Stage Lighting Market under the present scenario, as well as in the coming years, have been discussed in detail. It also analyzes the interaction of demand and supply forces in this market, as well as the factors that affect them. The internal and external factors that affect the market in terms of growth have been investigated by this market research. The study carried out examines the before and after aspects of the market.

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Millennials spend more on art than you might think. Here’s what Chattanooga Millennials buy and how they buy it. https://binggallery.com/millennials-spend-more-on-art-than-you-might-think-heres-what-chattanooga-millennials-buy-and-how-they-buy-it/ Tue, 01 Jun 2021 04:04:38 +0000 https://binggallery.com/millennials-spend-more-on-art-than-you-might-think-heres-what-chattanooga-millennials-buy-and-how-they-buy-it/ Millennials spent more on art in 2020 than any other age group of high net worth investors, according to a survey by UBS and Arts Economics. Thirty percent of millennials – the oldest of whom are 40 this year – have spent more than $ 1 million on artwork, compared to 17% of baby boomers, […]]]>


Millennials spent more on art in 2020 than any other age group of high net worth investors, according to a survey by UBS and Arts Economics. Thirty percent of millennials – the oldest of whom are 40 this year – have spent more than $ 1 million on artwork, compared to 17% of baby boomers, he reports.

As the art market evolves to serve a millennial audience, new trends are taking shape locally and around the world.

A large portion of millennial collectors are women and they seek a job that they connect with as a woman, says local art advisor Elizabeth Ruffner, who helps people find the best value and coins to build their collections through his company, Ruffner Art Advisory. As a result, the works of women have become more popular around the world, as well as the works of Asian and Middle Eastern artists, she says.

Raquel Mullins, owner of Wavelength Space, a new artist-run gallery in Chattanooga, agrees that art for millennials is more “a lifestyle statement.” Thanks to platforms like Patreon, millennials will even support artists in creating work that they feel connected with in the same way they might support an entrepreneur on Kickstarter, without expecting a return on their investment.

Here are some of the other habits in this new demographic that are impacting the art scene.

They are not as interested in the old masters.

Rachel Reese has worked in contemporary art for the past 12 years, first in commercial galleries in New York, Philadelphia and Atlanta and now as director of the Institute of Contemporary Art at the University of Tennessee in Chattanooga.

“Maybe the older generations were collecting art more for investment reasons and thinking about building a portfolio, or they were buying it for personal enjoyment,” she says. “But I think young collectors, young art patrons are less interested in thinking about it as an investment and more simply as something that they can connect to in terms of experience or something that they want to live with in their own life. house, ”Reese said.

In fact, says Ruffner, the millennials who inherit such coins tend to auction them off.

They don’t always spend a lot on a single room.

“I think a lot of people balk when they see the cost of fine art because they don’t always understand the work and time that goes into it,” says Mullins.

So to make art accessible, artists make it more affordable, “like between $ 50 and $ 300,” she says.

Still, Reese, who is a millennial herself, says young art lovers want something original.

“The attitude towards consumerism is a little different among the younger generations, and maybe a little more thoughtful,” she says. “I collect works of art myself and am much more interested in collecting an original work of art than buying something mass produced.”

They discover and buy art on Instagram and other online platforms, and galleries are doing more online commerce to capture these audiences.

According to “UBS and Art Basel Global Art Market Report 2021,” about a third of collectors purchased art through Instagram in 2020. Mullins says most of the artists featured at Wavelength also sell artwork on Instagram.

“Over the last decade there has certainly been a big explosion of different online platforms that have popped up that offer this type of transaction model for buying authentic works of art,” agrees Reese. “I think maybe ten years ago or more there was more reluctance to buy work online because it’s such a physical experience – to be able to see it, to make a decision in person and buy something in person.

The pandemic has accelerated this trend.

“I think galleries are significantly more dependent on online audiences than they were in the past to be viable today, especially last year when you can’t travel that much,” she says. “For galleries to stay afloat, they need to find audiences – virtual audiences and virtual collectors.”

However, the popularity of digital platforms will not mean the end of art fairs and physical gallery spaces, which still drive the market, says Ruffner.

“There’s a reason the art industry was pretty much the last industry to move online, and humanization is still important to millennial shoppers,” she says.

They are interested in different mediums and materials.

Ruffner says fabric is a big part of new artwork, but the variety of popular mediums doesn’t end there.

“In the same way that the field of contemporary art and the many different ways that artists work now have exploded, the type of collection has also grown rapidly,” says Reese. “You can collect video art, and you can do it responsibly and authentically with galleries or with an artist. You can buy an NFT.”

NFT stands for non-fungible token, a generally digital asset whose authenticity is verified using blockchain technology. It is essentially a digital record of transactions that is difficult to edit because it is sent over many networks.

“Thinking about how our world is so digitally connected and guided by digital content, how do you create an original work of art that only exists in the digital realm? How do you say that this image is the original image that all the rest is memorized or That’s sort of what I understand from what the NFT does, that it’s the single, original source image that you can buy, ”says Reese.

“What I think is different about this than buying a painting, for example, is that you understand as a collector that you cannot control its distribution or reproduction online, but that you own it. the original, ”she adds. “With a paint, once you own the paint in your home, you know it is not being distributed anywhere else. The image may be, but the work of art exists in the physical realm.



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